PurposeCity
PurposeCity

Episode · 5 months ago

07: Community, Connection, and Covid.

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The onset of the Covid-19 pandemic has made many of us reevaluate the importance of community and our connection with others. Dan West, president of the Livonia Chamber of Commerce, and Private Wealth Advisor at Executive Wealth Management, Rob Larsen, join Ken McMullen in a thoughtful, entertaining, and inspirational discussion on the importance of community and connection in our lives. 

PurposeCity is presented by Executive Wealth Management and exemplifies our core values of trust, community, and compassion. 

Host: Ken McMullen 

Guests: Dan West, President/CEO, Livonia Chamber of Commerce 

Rob Larsen, Private Wealth Advisor, Executive Wealth Management

Welcome to purpose city. Stories ofhumanity and action sponsored by executive wealth management. Yes, do. Purpose city donot necessarily reflected endorsement of executive wealth management. What is community really?Is it solely the place where we live, in those in our neighborhood or town? Then what is having a sense of community? Having a sense wouldsuggest a feeling. Is Community a human need we all share? If you'rehuman, this is for you and to discuss a community. Today we haveDan West, who is the Livonia Chamber of Converse CEO and President, andwe also have Rob Larson, private wealth advisor with executive wealth management, whosecore values are trust, compassion and community. I guys, ran can, thanksfor having me, thanks for coming out. So start things off,Rob Hey, how you done? Good, sir. Thinking about your past,how do you think you grew up in community? Looking back, whenyou're a kid, you probably weren't thinking, Hey, this is, you know, my community. As an adult, looking back, what's a communities?Community, communities? You grew up in communities, physical locations, highland. Actually start up in commerce when I was very young. moved to highland, went to Milford High School, then with the Central Michigan University for College, came back and still living now, living in commerce. Growing up,I didn't, you know, don't seek community as a kid, but Iwas always involved in sports, so I'd love playing baseball. Baseball was mygame and I was a catcher. I Love I was a catcher. Sonot very many kids wanted to be catcher growing up, so I took thatposition on and all of a sudden you're the one that's coach the most.You're the one taking a lot of flak, kind of guide in the Games,controlling the Infield, really managing the dug out sometimes to keeping people inline. So you kind of are naturally the captain of the of the Infieldwhen you're the catcher because you're taking signals from right things like that. Sokind of naturally fell into that kind of roll where I wanted Camaraderie and that'ssomething that I still strive for today and like trying to be involved in somesort of group or a team or something of that nature. It's just kindof unconsciously something that I look for all the time. I have a Ithink that's a right. I'm not picking your words by here. unconscious.That would be subconscious or unconscious subconscious? Yeah, so if you are unconsciousand yet a community of unconscious people would be pretty dull. Have you weird? Yeah, subconsciously, you know, you you're actively pursuing you know,in all then with people. Yeah, it's whatever it was. So forme I'm just playing sports all the time, being involved like that. So whatabout you? Down grew up in...

Detroit. I was also a baseballplayer, also a catcher. There we go. If you have an unconsciousteam, I played unconsciously at times. But yeah, that. But nowI grew up in Detroit till thirteen, moved to Livonium, Franklin High School, Wayne State University, Journalism Major. And then for me my real introductionof community was my first job out of college. I worked in a weeklynewspaper in santing, this Michigan north of the mackinaw bridge, where the guythey're really contrary to traditional journals and teaching saying to be effective writing about acommunity, to be involved in it. And as a journalist, Joe generallytold this be objective, in neutral. You said it's impossibly be objective,a neutral because we all our own biases and experiences. Or just to befair and honest, is what you do and it's a great education. Butas a journalist, and I learned this later in my chamber of Commerce career, when you're able to connect with people, it is through the community. Itis we care about our neighborhoods or stores or development or schools, areparks, all that stuff. That is a common thing that brings people together. So those listening and let's say South Dakota, north of the macin allbridge would be the upper peninsula of Michigan. It's not Canada. It's not Canada, it's the upper peninsula. So if you're working at a newspaper inthe upper peninsula, was it like the Moose Gazette or like? What kindof town was it up there? It was a town of three thousand people. Bull our tourism is huge because they have a fairy line to mack andisland. Macno a leading tourist attraction in a state of Michigan. snowmobilings bigthe in the s when I was working there they were really proliferating the Indiancasinos and that as an entertainment they were having shows. I saw George Carlinin one of the sue tribe venues up there at the time, but it'stourism, but it's very much small town life and the high school sports arehuge there and really every fish fry, no matter what the cost for achurch, for a family need, was always a big draw for the conser. For the advice to be to be involved in your community to be successful. That would suggest that there's more to community than just living by people.So meaning you live in a neighborhood, you may not even know your neighborsright, but you could have be involved in many communities outside of your community. So community really means connection. So your your boss is giving you advicethat you need to connect with people. They're going to do business with peoplethey trust, as opposed to just proximity. So I have a couple definitions herethat I pulled off of, like you know, the reliable Internet hereof community. See if you think about this. So here is one definition. A community is a social unit with commonality such as norms, religion,values, customs or identity. I've got...

...one other one for you. Thedefinition of community is all the people living in an area or group or groupsof people who share common interests. An example of community which they seem randomto me is a group of Buddhists who meet and chant together, instead ofsaying faith community. That was a pretty specific there right, a group ofpeople living together or in the same locality or who share interests or a senseof identity. So thinking about that definition and rob you hit it when youstart saying you know, you are involved in a team, in the commaraderie, but think more back then, if you take it back to the samequestion I started with, if this was more of a social identity than atown or location, what would be some community that you grew up in?Does that is at a different question. Now it's far like social identity.Yeah, what did I want to connect with or what did you just bybirth? You're born into a family. Wouldn't that be like our first community? Right, let me you probably have heard this before, but it's reallymaybe this will help the conversation a little bit. So a professor of biologythat a study in the past and the insights of nature and of the needfor human interaction. He cited cases where babies were fed, clothed and cleaned, but that's it, other than the minimal human contact that resulted during thesenecessary activities to address their physical needs. The babies were left unattended. Imean, who would do this for the first place, but they did.The result many of them died and the ones that didn't had serious and debilitatingdevelopmental issues. Even though they were all given the quote necessary sustain sustenance tosurvive via food and shelter, the lack of human contact literally killed many ofthem and their study after study of when it gets more into adulthood, youcan survive yourself, but it's depression, anxiety, all of these things.So there seems to be, even by science, a need for humans tohave social community, a place to belong, but a connection with people. SoI had, you know, we all had covid and we didn't allhave covid nineteen. We all lived through a world having the cove advise wherewe were isolated it and I lost work during that time and pretty much livingalone in a condo for a year brutal. It's pretty brutal. So I wouldliterally at times kind of go crazy and go to a mall just togo shopping because there's people there and that...

...felt worse. So there's community ofall these people you couldn't during covid. So I guess that's right. Butas soon as I could get out, I'm out around people, or I'deven go to a movie, whatever. But when you're by yourself, youdon't have that social connection. It feels the same, if not worse,and I didn't realize it I was reading these studies, but it was moresatisfying to watch movies because of your participating, although fictional, in other people's interactionsthen going out around people and not having any yeah. Well, Kenum, if you look at the last eighteen months, a lot of people werefor to follow orders and for what they thought was her safety and stuff likethat, had to stay home and stepped with their family, and I thinkthat's the one lesson we all learned. We are interdependent. Our happiness dependon other people. Are Primal instincts say that I'll keep to myself, protectmyself, stay away from conflict and stuff like that, but at the endof the day, thinking outside of ourselves what truly makes happiness. It's whatyou connect with people, and we were talking about various firms of community.It's like I have, you know, I have two teenage daughters. Soother families that are going through the same stage in life you have that bondas a community. They play travel sports, they go to the same school,same church, you know, hang out the same restaurant, do thesame things within Lavonia and my particular town. Those are all prospects to connect ascommunity and it's about having something in common with somebody but also able togiven share, an offer to the conversation. That's where connection happens and having thattaken away for really so long. And I think one of the problemsgoing forward, when you look up about mental health and people's other struggles goingforward, is that how do I get back to that, because we're outof practice, we haven't really done that consistently, and then I'll be thestruggle going forward. Yeah, and that was my experience to I mean doingwhat I do, managing client assets and doing all that stuff. Obviously covidwasn't fun for the market, but things recovered pretty quickly, relatively, andyou're still locked on at home and I was, you know, by myselfin an office basement trying to stay busy. But when you're when I wasn't connectingwith other colleagues regularly and like we do in the office, kind ofright. And then the things we do with our clients and it was justall web based stuff, but not having that office setting where I could bounceideas off of other other advisors or go to clients places a business to havemeetings with them. You started getting in your head a little bit too much. Yeah, you know, and those days are kind of wishywashy. SoI was really excited to get back. Now, if the second you could, I was there just trying to get back to normal. And, youknow, the clubs and stuff I'm involved with her still holding back where theywanted to meet facetoface. So I wanted to trickle back in as fast asI can. But yeah, it's the hard part. I lost one ofthe memberships and, you know, striving to find finding the next one aswe're kind of back to normal here.

So yeah, it was an interestingtime being in your own mind. Why that lockdown all day, wondering what'sgoing on out there? However, how's everybody handling all this? Am Idoing the right thing right now? I doing okay, everything was fine,but it was it buzz play with you when you have a little bit toomuch solidarity. Right. Well, to add that what rob was saying whenyou're able to collaborate in person with people. There's a sense of community there.You have a shared value of what's the best for the company, bestfor the customer. Get affirmation you're doing the good things. That works,that doesn't work. I have an idea, you have another one to make itbetter, and that's what makes the product. But also coming together tothe team is more gratifying as well. Yeah, so the collaboration the team, and you know, I don't. You can do zoom meetings, eachother's facial expressions. The bottom line is a with the zoom meeting and stufflike that, people aren't paying as close attention right when your facetoface there's actuallythere's actually hormones that are triggered that actually had like you to connect. Whenyou're able to talk face to face, shake hands, hog that type ofdeal, it makes a huge difference and feeling valued and connecting the people,and this is all part of that sense of value and I think all thesense of community we're talking about here works. Yeah, I'm not a scientist,but in the study I read it's Oxytonin for like the hug, theaffection, the closeness of people that gets triggered in a brain, especially inthe infant developmental stage, that bonds you with people. That's that's a needin your psyching and as adult we need it and it's found through it couldbe sound through good family relationships, you know, spouse relationship, and Ithink to me it kind of says to look and appreciate those maybe that wetake for granted, that we need them and they need us to be affectionate, kind people that feel safe to be around, because that nurture is amental need for us to feel at peace. Yeah, I'll tell you. Helpingclients transition into retirement. Is the worded retirement is ambiguous in my mind, because it is you make it what it is. But oftentimes you seepeople that don't have activities or goals or anything to do after retirements. Theyfind themselves depressed or lose their sense of self. CEOS or CEOS and howthey respected in their community at work, and then they go retire and noone cares anymore. Right, you don't have a sense of belonging anymore.So you have to you have to find those those clubs, those activities onthe effence, bowling or golf, Leagus or whatever. It is, orstaying in some capacity in your career, consulting or whatever that happens to be. But being not busy and not having anything to do is completely depressing andunfulfilling. Some people can say I'm very comfortable sitting around relaxing doing nothing's nottrue. You're looking forward to taking care of your house or cutting the grassor feeling the I did something today that was productive and that that's always mademe feel good, as having something to...

...do every day and doing that.But I think a thing to reflect on is this week, maybe this aday like today, in my schedule of things to do with the community aroundme, that maybe like just this general conversation on community. For people maybeenlightened, like okay, that means social community and that it's a human need. So who is it? Well, it's my family, it's it couldbe your faith community, could be whatever's in your sphere. But are youjust doing busy stuff and all of those, or do you take if I can, I, even in my twenty four hour day, take one hourwhere I have no plans, I'm not building or doing anything or working ona huge project, and just enjoy that company. You know I mean we'redoing a podcast. It's got different reasons for it, but we could justsit for thirty minutes and just kind of enjoy having a conversation outside of everythingelse, and that fil fills a human need. I think we literally willfeel better in our day then if we're just going through the motions, andsame with our family. Go home and go through the motions of this role, that role, clean the garage and do this for that, but justto sit down and I guess that's the old fashioned thing about you know theWalton's. I just dated myself, but sitting around a family dinner is thatone hour a day very important to look at other humans and and social interact. Well, just in a few minutes. I've got no rob here this morning. I've identified we find value and connecting with people in person, thesense to build trust with that and business without hard selling people, but byfocusing on the relationship. And we both have the baseball bond. So rightout of there I know we'll always have something to talk about and something tobond over. For a gentleman I just met. Yeah, I've known youprobably fifteen years. I've no bonding with you. I don't know what totalk about and no communications background, nothing to do with Lavonia, nothing you. Yeah, let's talk about Lavonia just one second. I wanted to soI don't forget. We're talking about, like you mentioned, Rob Socialization atwork. I have a code here from an article is reading on community andhas creating the conditions for community should be a goal of any organization. Ithink that's really important. If you just go in and your work drones,there isn't job satisfaction, there isn't personal satisfaction. At the end of theday, I don't think you have a better outcome or product. is afinancial planner, you know, building the relationships with your client hands that youcare about them and they're not just a number right in the office. Ithink our place is pretty good. On the summer, every other Friday wayof grill Friday. We had the CEOO two weeks ago grilling us all chicken, fried TRIMP and taking time just to stop working. And we're humans.Yeah, talk about it. Doesn't matter if your support staff, if you'rean intern, if you're the CEO. Let's just stop a minute and justsocialize a little bit. Yeah, the little things of just celebrating birthdays orbeing social. Well, I've I've always...

...advocated to our members of the yearsto always take a genuine interest in somebody than ourselves. Okay, every humanbeing likes to talk about themselves and, you know, think about themselves,but I think where you connect is if you take it. Tell me aboutyour situation at home, how the kids do in house, work, trainwhat are you learning at your job this day? Because we can always,even in business networking, we can always learn from somebody else's industry. Surethere's always something to be gained from that and apply it to what you're doingin your industry. So we've always tried to get people to do that andit's more gratifying and it builds the connections. Because here's the deal is that ifyou're going to go sell insurance one day, I mean I need youtoday, but if I make a relationship with the other time in six,seven months, you know I mean want to shop around, I mean wantto do something. I have somebody's looking for something, then you become thatguy or that lady that you can refer to to one of your friends orfamily that's looking for something at that moment. Yeah, that's really where business flourishes. Yeah, I learned that very early in my career, hearing rebuttlesfrom clients when I was a banker like Oh, I have a guy.Okay, everybody has a guy, I guess. Well, now I getto be that guy. But just like you said, it's not the hardcell, it's getting to know the person, if uncovering the real need, right, because everybody has the needs and I they know what we're going todo as far as managing money and stuff of that nature. But I haveto build real connections and that, yeah, not come off and you know,try to hard sell our firm. I don't need to do that.That's proven by you a lot of clients, referrals or whatever it is anyway.But if you come to me and say I should I do business withyou, I'm not going to rattle off ten reasons why we're amazing. Yeah, that's in the rollodecks. I can talk about that for sure, butI'm going to take a step back and say, well, maybe we aren'tgoing to work together. I need to find out more about you. Don'tsee how it you fit our our our firms outlook on what clients look likeand what we want our firm base to look like and maybe we do havea connection where it makes sense, where we do work together. We takea lot of time to do the financial plan first, with no obligation todo a business and stuff like that, so that that's really loose. Soin sales practice no one wants to hear the guy that's like use car sealed. Know this game is you know, it's twentyzero miles, only one previousowner. It's beautiful colors or whatever. It's a terrible example, but youdon't you're you see them get in at it's it's just having a conversation firstand get to know the person. Yeah, it's the a theory of Halot andBurns. Your first impression with somebody's very, very powerful attends and ifyou jumped, if you jump them right away, it's a bad impression atbut if you took the time to get to know hey, I like this, I like that, my family this, this, you do this, youdo that, that as a powerful first impression that will last with people. But if you have a negative first impression, that takes a long timeto break and you can be forever that person branded perceptive. That reality exactly. So that first inception, you first connection with somebody. You have tobe strategic about it. Absolutely so Livonia, Michigan. I have been associated withLavonia, as you know, and...

...work form and volunteer form, notlately so much, but I don't know, over sixteen years, even before that, before you know now I was working at a church there like fiveyears a total. I haven't lived there, but I've actually been a part ofthat community and some far number there twenty years. And what I havefound is the people that are there are you, meaning you went to schoolthere, you grew up there, you may have went to the up andyou know, for job purposes and learning whatever, but then you're back.I found there's a sense of community there that overall, people live there andthey don't like to leave. So why do you think what's different about Lavoniaor how does a town like that that? Because, honestly, to be honest, it doesn't have like a really great historic downtown where it's cute likenorth pill or Milford and you get the mingle around or whatever, but yetthere's a staying power of the social community. What is that or what's in thattown? You think? We've always talked about our community spirit at lengthin Livonia and if you look at it, it started with families. When familywhen Livoni you really started taking off in the S, building homes,build neighborhoods. They strategically built church, school and Park and just about everynew neighborhood throughout the fifties and s. The school population took off and allthat stuff. And at the end of the day you have a lot ofpeople that went through Livoni public schools, the CLERSVILLE school district, even theCatholic schools within that town. And you know your schools always a sense ofyour identity in your bond. So you have a lot of families through that. But through the years you have a lot of older people that bought homesthat stayed there until health what let them live anymore. You have a lotof three, four and five generation families. I'm a three generation family in Livoniaright now. My parents, my brother and I and our kids alllive in livonium and I just think when you look at the schools, whenyou look at the churches, look at all the youth activities, a lotof youth sports, a lot of arts programming, all that stuff, andyou did it all in that town. That just fosters and strengthens a senseto that community and the Livoni spree through the years. That's like the allclass reunion for everything to do with Livonia for many, many years. Youhave people that see each other once a year at that thing, but theyget back and they talk about all them are in school, we played thatgame, we played at that show, went to that, we work together, what have you. All that comes back and you know are you knowour youth years are very foundational and very formative to our wellbeing and you're ableto relive those when you're in a community that has so much to offer likethis. Yeah, and one of the social communities there that is really prevalentis their faith community. There's a church you could throw Frisbee and always hada church is there right in every neighborhood has one within walking distance, rightand it happened, and I know that...

...it happens, to have one ofthe longest prayer breakfasts and most successful in Michigan other than a couple that arecorporate sponsored and they keep going and that speaks a lot for and it's communityvolunteer let completely grassroots. No one gets paid for doing it as a passionfor the people involved in that community and they put together a great programming andwe sell out five to six hundred people every year. Can you're very instrumentaldoing that for many, many years. you're getting at here. You alwayshave someone else pet your back, right, but no. But in all seriousness, when you talk in five, six hundred people of all faiths ofChristian, Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, I mean everyone coming together. Andpeople think Lavonia is not a diverse place, but we do come together in avery, very diverse unifighting God and community for that two hours with song, with scripture, with inspirational words and with, you know, seeing people, hugs and you know, all the stuff that brings community together really isproliferated in many, many levels at that. But it's the attendance of it's aroundsix under, six under a year, which is pretty good. So thebusiness community you know about. Tell us a little bit about the businesscommunity there. What's really you talk about Lavonia being about? You have alot of people in Livonia. You know, your perfect example this. Can peoplethat maybe didn't grow up there don't live there but have a bond withthat place and you have a lot of people that maybe grew up there andstarted a business then may moved out of town, but all their community volunteerstuff is in is in Livonia. They support the Symphony Orchestra, they supportlocal schools, charitable causes, of Sports Team would have you. Their senseof community is still in the town where they work more than necessary where theylive, even though their kids may go to school another town. And I'llgive you an example. A lot of new homes are being built Lavonia rightnow in a real stage and told me that seventy percent of the people thatare buying these new homes in Livonia, either currently or formerly lived in Livonia. They're coming back to town. So there is a draw to this placeand I do think it is a tight sense of community and honestly, myfavorite part of Livonia is I am an expert. I mean an expert notin many things in life, but on blizzards and flurries, specific the EMINEMones, all right, I'm listening, and the Dairy Barn. I evenon my instagram I only take photos of like my travels and great things inthe world and I have a picture of the dairy barn on my instagram.Well, it's so good. And then I'll go to art beach and eatsand real oak and love a picture of Baits at night and so sort ofinteresting crafted fashion as sold art, you know. So it's like these littlethings come on on Livonia. That's right. So to to wrap this up,I mean it's an interesting conversation. What I got out of just kindof prethinking about this and just kind of prepping for this conversation is community.When you think of the word community, the TV show could pop in yourhead, like the not funny TV show. Look it up. That's what that'sso cops up to. It's not...

...that funny. My kids into thatnow, streaming community, or it's generally well, my community where I live. But when you think about it, unless you're really an extravert, notmany people their own community is there. But you think about social interaction andwell, my community is, you know, the modern word is tribe. Youknow who's your tribe? It's the the people that are in your worldthat fill that social need and you're doing the same for others. Our lastguest was Chris Elias. He's the CEO of execute, who he helps companiesfind core values. Used to be the the president of allies brothers or abig boy restaurants, and we talked about core values in a company, butwe got on a conversation about we didn't use the word community, but itkind of goes with this, as the people who end up in your socialcommunity ends up being people you share values. It was in one of these definitionsyour core values with you kind of just connect with those people. gravitateor you gravitate. You can have a conversations with people you know. You'rein the room, Dan's in the room and you guys connect and you leaveme over here. That's fine, I don't have baseball stories, but you'vegot some kind of shared experience and value that. Now there's a connection thatI may or may not make, but it's those values, it's who weare and we have a need to connect with those people and I think youknow that happens are through our whole lives. Yeah, and I that just remindedme of randomly, when I was in college. You meet several people, right, there's not many people are still stay in touch with from college. Maybe three or four from outside my original circle from actually went to Milford. A lot of kids what's central with me. So you kind of naturallyhang out those people from your community because you're comfortable with that, and thenyou meet other groups. When I met one particular particular guy there, Iknew immediately I had to know it him for a long time. It isvery driven, business oriented, entrepreneur. Rule just really had his head onhis shoulders and I could see that he would would be going places, youknow what I mean. So it's I myself kind of having that same typeof personality. We gravitated towards each other and bounce ideas of each other overthe last year and a half during covid kind of lost a little bit ofconnection with them a little bit, but I know he's doing great and I'mdoing fine too, and it's one of those things where I, when Iwanted for saw like that's the guy knows what he's talking about. He's notfull of it right. Yeah, he's going to be going places and Iwant to know him outside of college. So that was yeah, you justnaturally gravitate to what your personality drives. Yeah, during the isolation time Iwas telling you about not only covid but loss of work covid which is totallyisolating. I mean I got to the point I take a six mile walksevery day. I time for that, sadly, and it did a lotof good to think things through, but I got I was so deprived ofsocialist I was looking forward to see things.

This chicken that was always like threemiles into my walk and I felt pretty lonely if I didn't see thatchicken that day. And of course I dank chicken M I mean, Iknow you're making light of it can but there's a lot of people still todaythat are still afraid to leave their house or afraid to go out and about. They're going to remain anxious for a while. And really the best suggestionI give to anybody try to invite somebody to something that's right, you know, a chamber event, your church, out to dinner, out to thehigh school football game. Invite them, remind them there's people out there forthem to connect with. HMM, and they may say no, but thatgesture, I think, will be much appreciated to give them the chance toreengage with society. And if you don't know what to joint create something yourself. So the best thing I did was, okay, I've got to do something, I got to get my mind in good place. What do Ihave to offer other people? And I started. There's some things I amknowledgeable about, and I started having a zoom Saturday morning guys thing where Ilead a study. I've been doing that almost a year now and that's becomethat helped me during that time. I looked forward to those Saturdays and Ispent the week studying for it. It gave me something a little mentally.Every day these people end up being there inviting other people. So they're acrossthe state. There's a guy in Pennsylvania. They're all over and then they're invitingsomebody else. There a group of all these people I never would havemet and our study topic is going to be over next Saturday and I'm prettyupset about it because I've gotten to know these people. They've become part ofmy social community. But it helped me in that time. I had somethingto look forward to. I knew social interaction was coming up and you foundyourself a sense of purpose looking for I found a sense of purpose. Itell my friends, parents, clients this. To you have to have something lookforward to, like it's a vacation come up or whatever it is.You put something out there on the calendar that so that today you're going tomake decisions to lead to that goal or lead to that excite meant you know, so you're not just going through the mundane parts of life. So I'dsay anyone listening, if you are lonely, depressed, think of what you canoffer people. Start Your own little community. Look around and find themor look at the community. May Have not realize it. We're out thefamily and friends. It's it's a literally lifesaving yeah, and any last thoughts, Dan. No, really, community comes out of thinking out of yourself. I mean using what you have and thinking, i'side yourself to connect withothers and always try to find how you can take a genuine interested other people. I think that's how you connect with people. And like even with roband I right now, we can talk baseball and start yet a guy justmats, baby catchers. Yeah, always getting yell that. Always had hadthe biggest mouth right out there. So you did, yeah, you did, for everybody had to hear you. I can really and if the playand if a cut was missed. You're the one I get yelled at.So you know I got the D voice too, so if I can goup another decimal, everybody in this whole room hear me, or building,you know. So it's I can yell...

...and my kids to this day stillthink of a big mouth, I'm too loud. All Right, thank you, rob. Thank you for Dan. This is a great conversation and thispodcasts is always sponsored by Executive Wealth Management, which rob is a private wealth advisorat, and wearing closest program out with seeing a little bit more aboutwhat rob does at executive wealth management. Oh we are are we okay?My name is Robert Larson, private wealth advisor with the executive wealth management andI wanted to get into financial services right out of college. I graduated rightbefore the recession and when that hit I was brand new into the Corporate Americaworking at a big bank and I saw it. I saw the impact ithad on many businesses, many families, my own family, and I realizedI want to be in the know and my my industry. I want toknow what's going on the markets and why things react the way they do,and I believe the key to any type of success is to have a plan. Many families, young professionals, kids out of college, many business ownersas well. Everybody has different goals. We're here to help create peace ofmind. Whatever your goals happened to be, whatever phase of life you're in.It's more than our fiedishe responsibility. It's who we are. Build,defend, advance. If this aligns with what you believe and you're interested tohear more, give me a call.

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