PurposeCity
PurposeCity

Episode · 3 months ago

08: Living Your Glory Days Today

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Your best days are not behind you! Learn to appreciate past achievements while enjoying new challenges and successes today with guest Kurt A. David. 

Kurt is the executive producer of numerous TV shows, including creator and host of the Emmy Award-Winning TV Show and acclaimed book, "From Glory Days," which interviews Hall of Fame and World Champion former professional athletes about their successful transition into life AFTER pro sports. www.kurtdavid.com  

PurposeCity Podcast is presented by Executive Wealth Management and exemplifies our core values of community, compassion, and trust. www.ewmadvisors.com/purposecity 

 

Welcome to public city stories ofhumanity in action sponsored by executive wealth management. Yes, TomPurpose city do not necessarily reflect an endorsement of executive wealthmanagement, hurt when you're, six foot, nine andyour siblings. What you've had several, as you know, well aware, they're allabove the average six foot, what are their six? Seven, six, six, six onesister, a five eleven sister we did have one run to the litter right. Shewas only five six. She was our track runner. All six of US ran athleticscholarship and two of US played professionally and I jut imagine thathousehold growing up. I don't even know what the stats with that I mean for oneperson to make it. The professional sports is phenomenally small in thestat world right to have to H, and then you add, they all have scholarships. Sowhat the height question is- and this is an honest question- I'm thinking-because it's not just you're kind of tall, but if that's what you grew up inyour siblings and that's normal everyone. So when you live the life andGod in the world, do you feel tall or to just the world scene short? Well,I'm. First of all, I always tell people, I'm four foot and thirty three inches.I don't tell right off the bat they got to earn it right to get as so oftenthat it's four foot and thirty three inches if they failed math. I tell him,you know I'm six foot, nine, but yeah. You know. For me it was a normalsee. There was a certain normalcy growing up, first of all, being arounda family of that size and we were it always that size. You know to be honest:mice, bur you weren't, born that I was not born at side. I would feel for mymother if that was the case, but my biggest spirit was. I was five elevenat the beginning of my seventh grade year and six five by the end of myeighth Grade Year: Oh Wow, so I grew up six inches between the start of myseventh grade and and he my eighth grade very painful. I was very active,and so it was very painful. Every joint, my boy growing pains are real, it'svery real yeah and the good news was. I was Dunking, a basketball in eighthgrade right. That was a good news. Bad News is, I H to pay for it, but youknow probably the biggest adjustment for me not to skip ahead, but when Iwas done playing was being back a normal population right you're, so usedto being around people of my stature that it was. That was the norm rightand all of a sudden. When I came back to the real world again, it was likewow. This is you know, probably my first real understanding of that was. Iwas planning in a national tournament in Kansas City when I was in collegeand we were ranked eighth in a nation. This other team we played against wasout of California. They were ranked pretty high and in the scouting reportwe had heard about this other team, particularly they had a guide that wasseven foot, eight wow literally he was seven foot eight in this team. Now doyou feel short in that situation? Well, here's the rest of my story. The histeam was staying at the same hotel. We...

...were downtown Kansas City and I'm inthe elevator and this guy comes walking in and I'm literally looking up at himthinking. Oh my goodness, this is what everybody else has to do with me. I wasmy first experience of really understanding that and he's stuck inthe elevator, but it was really my first experience and understand whatnormal sized people are dealing with with me. So that was a Othoman for me,yeah, interesting, so so six. So it's obvious what sportyou played well, not necessarily Horse Jack, yet didn't quite work out for me,but the cliges weren't too fast, but you know basketball. I mentioned by sixin the family. There was eight of us in a household and six kids and five of usplayed basketball and the one was a track runner. She was really good. Sheran at Central, Michigan University and you know basketball just became oursport. I ran track into some other sports as well, but when I playedbaseball, the strikes one was just way too big right and I hated having a ballthrown at me all the time and first base. So I'm like this is not my sport,so it wasn't your first love it just kind of no, I just kind of came into.It unfortunately had some older, siblings and I saw the success theywere having and always played with older kids, and so, even though I wasbigger, I was still young and playing with older kids, which helped but yeah.You know, I think, when I first realized that basketball was going tobe, my ticket was probably my freshman or sophomore year in high school, whenwe start doing very well as a team, and I started seeing success in numberswere starting to come as far as personally and as a team, and that'swhen I started realizing. Oh okay. This could take me somewhere, even if youhave a physical lean towards a certain sportlike height for basketball. Yes, that does mean you have the agility, as Inot so. I know a lot of tall guys that wellthat's what I'm saying is there kind of even with taller larger guys than youof these small basketball players that are just all at it and they have allthis speed and Agilita? Is that maybe a negative that tallerpeople don't have that you got to work a little harder, a yeah? You know it'sa it's. A great question: Can I think part of it is. You know there is acertain height of the hope. It's ten feet, a right, and so, as a result, Ipractice dismissions pre dispositions towards haller people, because you'recloser to that hoop right and if you're, strong and an agile and can jump evenmore. So it is more difficult for somebody of a different stature, lowerstature, shorter stature to excel because of that and that that there'snot other parts of the game. But you know it's a big man, sport, yeah rightyeah, I mean I middle school, tackle football. Theyput me as left guard, which is usually the huge people right yeah. Ah, butthey didn't have a lot of agility and I was small and used to being kind ofactually bullied. So I was tough yeah and around just get around him right,go right, an get around him, your faster, maybe a little meaner and yeah.That was my thing. I didn't fit the Elia form at all another I mentionedabout the seven foot. Ah Another AHA moment. In fact I was probably nineteen.Twenty years old...

...in college, we had a gentleman thatcame from Japan. His company from Japan sent them over to get American degree,and this guy literally was four foot eleven and he would hang out with thisbasketball players, which is kind of comical in itself. Right. You see thisfour foot eleven guy hanging out with these six ten, six, nine, six, sevenpeople and one night. He and I were screwing around. We had a couple ofPOPs, and so he and I were just kind of screwing around and you know punchingeach other and kicking each other and just messing around right- I'm justgoing to push it on it. Well, all of a sudden. This four foot, eleven guy snap, something happened. You know Idid something and he he could have literally threw me through a play classwhen it's the first time my life, that I felt like I had zero control on mybody. I had no control in my body. He could have done anything. He wanted tome at four foot eleven right and here I'm in one of the best shapes of mylife and and this guy. Just he had his way with me. I mean he could have doneanything he wanted and after after we calm down a Lebani says well, I saidyou know, I'm sorry, I didn't mean to get you up cent or anything. I saidwhat was that all about? He goes on with double black belt, and that was myAha moment at nineteen twenty years old to realize you know, size is importantright. If you know what to do it was. It was great for me to learn that andthat capacity versus some other way than I when it turned out so fortunateright. So you saw basketball as career yeah, I became a ticket, a became. Youknow it's what I did right. I think one of the biggest challenges for athletesis, is it who you are or is it what you do, because I think that helps withthat transition, which again I have to get too far ahead. But you know it'swhat I did. I love basketball. It provided a lot for me as far as ascholarship as far as playing you know professionally, but it's just what Idid it. It wasn't who I was, and it ended why I literally was having a blast over inEurope. I played I was playing over in Europe and I came back. I had a freeagent. Try out out in San Francisco. There was eighteen of us by invite.Only all I saw was a gym in a hotel for three days straight. It was tough asbasketball. I've ever experienced O for three days. I wanted for Nee Sergeyfollowing that. Try Out and found out it was time to get a real job. Thedoctor, when he went inside the orthopedic said You know what you cankeep playing basketball and that walk by the time you're forty or you cangive it up, and here I was, I think I was twenty- seven, twenty six, twentyseven twenty eight years old and literally limping like an old man allthe time- and I knew there was something wrong. I didn't think it wasthat bad. So you know faced with that decision, it's like hey, you can keepplaying or you can give it up, but I had opportunity to play, but you know Iknew that I wanted to walk, but I was forty and so it was one of thosechoices I had to make. So how did you feel at that time? I mean it's easyjust to talk about Rocabey skin past it yeah a kind of emotional impact yeah. Iknow it's a great question. I was angry. I was very angry. I remember laying atmy parents couch just laying there just being angry like how could this endthis way right? You know here I'm having the time of my life enjoying theworld and just traveling and getting paid, and it's over it's all over, andI remember sitting there just being angry and after a bit of time Irealized you know what I was tired of...

...being angry and I got tired of feelingthat way and at some point I I took a year off just to kind of regroup andfigure out what I wanted to do and partway through that year. I got sotired of being angry and so tired of just sitting around. I said you know, Ineed to do something productive and I decided to start working at a masters,went and got a master agree and counseling, and so that helped mydirection to get the new direction and are sense of purpose. So even so, counseling is great, a middleschool right yeah I did in my previous professional life. I was a middleschool council yeah, but in like the deepest part of you did you always feellike? I should have been a basketball player. I should have went farther.This is pretty good. This is just how life goes so that you know you haveyour book from Glory Days. You've interviewed, I think, about fiftyformer athletes. Professional athletes about their former glory days. Did youfeel, like you had glory days and now you're just making a living yeah? No,it's! I think one of the biggest things is understanding who I am right,because I think that's the difference. I think alluded to it earlier that whoI am was different than what I did. I played basketball right. That's what Idid it's not who I am to back up a little bit to get to who I am. I haveto go back to my foundation, which was growing up with eight of us in a housewith one bathroom wow. Do Y? U H one tooth pressure, I hope not Ki. Don'tremember. I think I would remember that I have been dramatized, but not thatmuch but yeah, and so it was very difficult. You you realize early anAlife that life is not about you. You know when you live in with eight of youin one bathroom. My mother was a teacher at a local private school. MyDad was the director of social services, so I was doomed. I was doomed from thestart to be in one of those industries where you just give back, you thinkabout others right, because that's what my parents did right. So what led youfrom the Middle School Counsellor, which is noble back into doingsomething with professional sports having producing television, showswriting books a other professional glory. Well, it was the four o'clock inthe morning. It was three or four o'clock in the morning. It was one ofthose Aha moments. Literally literally, I woke up middle o the night, and itwas crystal clear. I had the thought and an like. I tell kids or anybodyevery every good movie, every good TV show every book starts with one thingand that's an idea and at three o'clock in the morning. I had this idea thatwouldn't it be neat to sit down with other former professional athletes andhere about their transition, after pro sports and, more importantly, how theyrecreated her success and that's pawn the idea of my book from Glory Days, and so I interviewed twenty formerDetroit Pistons Tigers, Red Wings and lines being here in Detroit. I thought.Okay, let's start here in Detroit, I interviewed these twenty different, allof famers, everybody from Dave, Bang to Alan Houston, to Lem Barney to JimNorthrop. You Know Tatling, I could go through the whole list, and so I satdown with them and talked about not just the glory days. We talked aboutthat transition from sports, which is very real.Hundred percent of professional athletes, ultimately lose your jobright, right, undeniable fact, kind of percent right and so a hundred percentof people listening or viewing this...

...watch podcast there you go listen, Iwould hope so it's so it's a good stay to know, but they, when they get donewith their sports. You know how do they recreate their success, so those arethe target of who interviewed for the book. The book end up doing well becamea regional bestseller. My agent and I at that time said boy. This is biggerthan a book. Let's create a TV show, so we literally created a TV show based onthe accounts. Up of the book did nine interviews and season, one where weinterviewed former professional athletes about their life afterprosport til, they re created a success and it just continued from there. We'vedone four seasons when a Mban season for from interview with Rocky Blye andPittsburg, and we continue to scale him. So what I appreciate about what you dois it's not just going back and reminiscing about the good old sportsdays in the home runs that were hitting allthis. It encourages people in their personalize businesses and that not tolive in your glory days, give some more stats about you. Oh it's about whatit's like. After a professional athlete, we see their glory days, but we don'tsee what happens after their glory yeah, I'm so glad you asked that. Can becauseyou know we, you know my production company glories productions looks toinspire others to the stories of highly successful people that live a life assignificance right. That's our mission and when you talk about pro sportshundred percent of professional athletes, ultimately lose er job.Twenty five percent of NFL players our bankrupt within the first year outtwenty five percent. Seventy eight percent of NFL players are broke withintwo years. Sixty percent of NBA players within five years are broke and ters upto an eighty percent divorce rate right from job loss to disaster. That is thereality for these pro athletes, and so we, with with the show from glory days,talk about not only their glory days, but we talk about that. Gory transitionright and some of them, like one of the guys we had the show, was darn McCartydaren had a very public and ugly transition out of Pro Sports. Good newsis he's been sober, he's recreating success, and so we had him on the showto talk about that. How did that happen? What did you do and every athlete wehave in the show? Not that they don't go through that very serious transition,but they found a way to recreate their success again right. So not a lot of uscan relate to being a professional athlete correct and making tens ofmillions of dollars and what not we can relate to a career change. We canrelate to a failed relationship, absolutely can relate to disasters andthis or that- and we don't really hear those after stats that you just gave.Yes, that is actually worse a lot of times in most of ournormal lives and we only see their glory days. So so it's not just about their glory days.Then it's not just about pointing out like hey, feel better buck. Yeah feelbetter about yourself, because their lives, you know, go in the toilet.Afterwards, it has to lead somewhere and then youbeing a counsellor, shows compassion and caring for the human yeah a person. So what does the next?How do people come back and have what I...

...like to say a new glory day wherethey're not living in the past? You can appreciate the past, but have a new fulfilling satisfyinglife. Looking forward yeah, no that it's you know it's so important,because we all deal with transitions will deal with change, we'll deal withadversity right all of us in our lives, whatever it might be personallyprofessionally. Part of it is understanding that thisis a phase right. This is just a temporary phase. In other words, youknow one of the things that I learned from my research with the athletes forthe book and then the interview on the TV show and in my council degree, isthat I realized there was a commonality of success rite that these athletes asthey went through this transition. There was a commonality for those thatfound success again and in being the simple mind that I am, I created anAcron to remember what those five things were and as rules are you lesand each letter stands for something. Each letter means something, and Icould do a you know a ninety minute presentation just on at alone rightwhat those rules are how's. It apply and I'm getting more and more requestto speak to military and more more request to speak through organizationsand corporations that are going through transition and change because theyapply not just to professional athletes in that transition. They apply to allof us right in life as a result, so you actually have spent time withprofessional athletes going through counseling them. Through these fivesteps, yeah with their transition, absolutely yeah, you don't have toreveal the magic five steps. Are the five steps revealed in your book? Youknow the book is all interviews. It's interview, each each chapter, hisinterview with a different athlete, lambare or Ted Lindsay, and it talksabout their glory days. It talks about their transition, but also talks abouthow they regretted o success and what they're doing, though, so the gist ofyour of your five? Yes, what would that be in an a synopsis, Yeah Yeah in aECRIN version? The first irs of the first letter Iris stands for refocus.What, if one, is that any athlete or any company or any vidual he orefuseand the best way to refocus, is to look at your current goals and establish newgoals we so not to interupt. I think that's so important when you just said,because it's not trying to refocus to get back correct to wet you lost yeah.It's actually refocusing on where you're at now, where your life is atnow, where you like to be and where you'd like to be a because in part ofdoing that, it recreates that passion and purpose again right as athleteswere extremely passionate people extremely passion over the top,passionate right, and so that passion is an important part of establishing anew life and a new phase of finding that you know, there's nothing! That'sgoing to replace professional sport, nothing! You know there. You can say:Oh Yeah, I'm doing this and it's not going to replace it. It's not going tobe the same, certainly might have the same level of passion or same level ofexcitement, but finding that that new passion of purpose, that's so importantto redeveloping that fire again in theirgut. Do you think it's equally as hard or maybe more difficultwhen you see whether s professional athletesor on our more personal basis, a level of our career are different. Thingswere involved in where you need to refocus while you're in it and not stayin it too long yeah. That's it that get...

...to the third one which I'll get to awhich is the L. actually is what you're talking about so the iris refocusedthat you was using network. What I found is that you know as an athleteyou have a vast network of people around you and using and tacking that Icontacted you on my Linton, absolutely yeah, absolutely tapping into thatnetwork of people, and I always tell people I'm not talking about using andabusing people, but once you have your refocused, you know what direction youwant to go. It's tapping in your network to say, Hey, listen! This iswhere I'm heading: How do we create an win, win between us sure, right and sotamping? That network is very important again. I could go ninety minutes onjust alone. The L is letting go which barn on is the most difficult forprofessional athletes and for a lot of us actually right and that's what youwere just alluding to was that letting go by? When do you know that boy? Ishould start letting go of something and everybody's different everybody'spattern. Everybody's I mean I've talked to some professional athletes atfifteen years later still feel like they could still play right right. Theydidn't let it go and they hurt themselves and I've talked to othersthat a week after they got cut, you know I sat down with the form DetroitTiger picture that got released after spring training and a week after he andI sat down, he was done. I mean he let go. He moved on he's doing very welland so everybody's different, but it's such an important part of movingforward, whether it be from sports or whatever it is letting go right, and sothat's the l. The e stands for execute. In other words, what I've discovered isthat this process of transition and change isn't a want and done. You gotto continue to execute and again I can go a lot deeper into that. A greatexample of that as a gentleman that I interviewed, that was a hollow famerout of Washington DC basketball player when in a syracuse became a hall ofFamer in college, wanted to be a number one. Drastic by the Detroit Pistonswent on to become an NBA hall of Famer, went on the bill of five hundredmillion dollar a year business you want to end to then become mere Detroit andthey've been continued to execute over and over and over again. So it's not aone and done I just don't transition once I continue to execute. I andthat's so important and the ask the last letter in the academic rulesstands for someone. What I've discovered as having a mentor sort ospeak a person that helps you get to where you want to be once you have thatrefocus and go through those other steps, understanding, there's oneperson in particular that can be like a mentor to you. Have you had mentorsI've had lots of mentors and different phases of my life right, depending onwhat Phase I was involved with. I have producers right now that are mymentors from the TV production side of it. One of the guys is a formerproducer of the movie Rudi. You know the movie right he's an Orange County,California and he and ice connect, and I consider him one of my mentors tolearn from and help me connect. I mean he's in his is now and has nothing toprove, as he says, other than hoping others and so he'd be one of mineprofessionally. So I have here actually looked it up. I loved. I heard youinterview your talking about the all glorious fleeting story forhistory. Share that I love history. You know not just sports history, buthistory in general, and so one of the analogies that I'd like to use is fromthe Roman Empire Right for anybody that...

...studies at the Roman Empire, when ofthese generals, came home from their conquering lands right. These generalswould come home back to Rome and have their their plunder and everything thatthey got from these kind of green lands. They always had something called acampaign. I was a big parade. It was basically like the Super Bowl parade oftoday. In other words, they would come back to their home in Rome and it was abig parade they be on their chariot. It was such a big deal that even theirkids were dressed in white and be another chariots behind them, but oneof the things you can read about in history, it's just true that, as thesegenerals are going through the streets of Rome, getting all these acalanesabout all these big triumphs that they had. They have somebody whispering andchirping in their ear the whole time all glory is fleeting yeah, that'scrazy, all glory. So, in other words great, you did this what's next rightand that's just an attitude to have, and I love that story. I love that partof history and I think it's applicable very much so today still it definitelyis I'd like that. I was looking up to see if I could find another one. Ican't out do that one, but I found one and if you want my own O, read it yea,let it go ef. This isn't just hey, Google. I found this on different websites state at differenttimes. Former secretary of state, James Baker, m member James Baker is one said.Someone asked me what was the most important thing I had learned sincebeing in Washington, I replied that it was a fact that temporal power isfleeting and here's his little quick back story on that Baker went on toobserve that once driving through the White House Gates, he saw a man walkingalone on Pennsylvania Avenue and he recognized him as having been thesecretary of state in a previous administration there. He was alone noreporters, no security, no adoring public, no trappings of power. Just onesolitary man alone, with his thoughts in that mental picture, continuallyserves to remind me of the impermanence of power and the impermanence of place,a hundred percent yeah hundred percent. It's one of the biggest challenges forathletes that I hear as they say it gets so quiet right. The phone stopsringing, Yep and and the one of the Red Wings in the view a he was funny aboutit. He says why is it when I'm making all this money? Everybody gives me freefood, free cars, free suits, but now, when I'm not making all this money, Ihave to pay for everything right and it's kind of that attitude and all of asudden. It's like wow, you know it's reality right. It's I call it. Realityis what it is yeah. So I'm not trying to sum up your career and all this, butI just love the whole theme of it's fun, especially for sportsfanatics to her see their stars to hear their stories. But frankly, you can getthat in other venues, absolutely yeah, but then to hear their struggles yes and to be able to relate to their struggleyeah humanizes them a bi, Omani yeah, that's the goal, an audience watchesour shows and they look at it and say wow. I didn't know he went through thatand I can relate right. Yeah. Probably...

...one of the most impact I mean I've hada lot of impactful stories. One of his guy by the name of Charlie BatchCharlie batch was a quarterback in the NFL. He was at eastern he's fromPittsburgh. Originally he was at Eastern Michigan University. It wasfunny story how we ended up there. He's like. I never even knew where Hipsleywas right, but they were the only one to offer me a scholarship. Basically,so I went to eastern is Charlie. Batch is junior year at eastern Michigan. Hegot a phone call from his mom back in Pittsburgh and his mom said: Hey,listen. You got to come back home and he's like well mom, I'm riting, thmiddle o school football work out, she's like no. You need to come homenow and he's like well man what's going on and she finally opened up on thephone and said your seventeen year old sister was jus murdered by a gang beingrelated shooting grab by shooting. So Charlie talked to the coaches thathe's to making universities said, you know I got to go home, help burying mysister help, my mom, I don't know if I'm going to be back, I'm man not beback, so he went home buried. His sister MOM's, like Nope, go back toeastern finish. Your degree finish: Your career broke every recordquarterback record at eastern Michigan after that got drafted by the Lions andtraded to Pittsburgh on two super bowls with Pittsburgh, and this is where thestory goes, and this is why I bring it up. Is that Charlie, to this day nowhas a foundation where he has inner city kids involved with sports andeducation to get him off the street right, and he said if I can save onelife and honor my sister. This is worth it. What I'm doing here, and so thoseare the kind of stories we want to get out there, that people don't know about,and it also helps people understand yeah. I can recreate turned tragedy.The triumph I mean ARY Kipples, another great example right at very public,very ugly transition because of his own personal situations and then his son,and he turned that try of the tragedy and turned into a triumph now andtravels all over talking about depression and helping people andadvocating right. You know I going to go back to one ofthe statistics you said at. Was it eight e eighty percent divorce rate?Yes, divorce right, so this can't just be that they were gold diggers or theyjust wanted to be the sitting in the stands, and now their season ticketsare gone because of what's going on there yeah well the divorce rate. Youknow people say they're out cheating in their wives. You know yeah there's someof them. Are you know, but imagine this you know like I tell people, I don'tcare, how much money you make if you go and take a ninety F. Five percent paycut while you're all of a sudden, not on the road. I mean these guys are onthe road six months out of the year, so you go from that being on the roadanymore, to total, to with your spouse, with a ninety, five percent pay cut right. What marriage would survive thatyeah and that's the reality right? They take a ninety five percent pay cut.They go from Bein a road every day at all of Udder Tototo, with this big paycut, and it's that's why? That's probably the mainreason why there such a high divorce rate. As a result, that's crazy. Soyou'd announced big news. Lately, Yeah Yeah, we just publicly went with thefact that I'm no longer hosting the show we've been four seasons. I've beenthe host and executive producer, but we ah just tired, Doug fluty his bantrophy winner in sports, broadcast or dug flood he's going to be a new hostwhich is great drugs. A Class Act he's a lot of fun and he's going to add allno level of what we're doing with the show. When I first read your and how'spen on that social media, if I first...

...rat not hosting the Sim like Oh andthen you definitely think well that really make a to me. That would be like you know, Ken, not hosting this podcastanymore. Well. Why? But then, because you know this is about compassion andcommunity- a Mother Teresa coming in exactly who I was going to say, butMother Teresa is going to host the show and Everist, oh, that that there's nobrainer that makes sense, yeah and so yeah, and so we're excited about andI've sed from the start, when I first created a show that if somebody withbetter cheek bones, help sell this show better, I have no ego right, I'm allfor that, because it's still my baby and I'll will be involved in a day today with it. So give a little more just worth, throwing out his name, but Imean he's: Some of the teams he's played on Yeah Doug Doug was in Boston,obviously had the hill Mary Famous Hall Mary Pace when he was play at BostonCollege. He went on to play with the Buffalo Bills, went on to play in NewEngland played in the C fl on a couple championships in the C fl and sincehe's been a broadcaster Bin, a sports broadcast with NBC sports and like thisis, is nine hirten season now with them, and so we've been talking to him for awhile, and you know during the pandemic, we its pause button for a while, butnow we're resurrecting that and really excited about getting things rollingout again and he's he dug is bringing her whole list of different level ofguest, all his friends so called friends, so to speak, which is veryexciting. Good and purpose. Point yes, what's that about yeah three years ago,Devin Savon and I were in an event called C twelve. It's a Christianbusiness owner organization, a national organization, and he- and I were atthis and those are like executives yeah, it's CEO or business owners right andso we're at this meeting and afterwards he came up to me and he says: Hey, youknow I have this idea and be one o. You know run I've been want to do this fora while and and he and I were looking at- and I said, yeah- let's, let's dothis, and so that's how it spawned. It's started with Avon's idea he's thefounder and he's also our co purpose point it's a leadership organization inAlesi Development Organization, which were our focuses to help individualsand organizations reconnect with their purpose. In other words, often we seeorganizations that start with a purpose and as they continue to scale and grow,they have to add more people, and when you had more people, you have to hadmore processes and we have to had more prefaces processes. You have tocontinue to look at the bottom line to say boy. We have to continue to besustainable, but they've lost original site of that that original purpose, andso our goal is not that we don't talk about people or don't talk aboutprocesses or don't talk about profits, because you have to have all those tobe sustainable and continue to scale but reconnecting the purpose throughoutall that yeah, and so that's what we do with purpose point. So you basicallyget them ready, focused a initial core valley, yeah absolutely, and we do itthrough different ways. We've keen on speakers. We have coaching. We actuallyhave purpose summit that we do annually our next one's very exciting, we'regoing to be down at the university in order. Dame is where we're going tohost it at this next year in two thousand and twenty two. So it's goingto be a big deal and yeah, it's really exciting to see people. What wakes me up every day and gets meout to leave my family is to go and see...

...other people excited about their livesand helping people develop their lives right. One last topic: This was so vague on social media. Idon't remember if it was a picture or a video clip, but it was entitledbirthday, cakes for homeless, kids, yes, yeah and I don't get choked up thateasy, but I got to say just the thought of that and you're walking into a roomwith kids and yet a birthday, cakes yeah. Who does that or what is that?Well, many years ago I read something very important to me. It said to thosethat have been given much much will be demanded right, right, I'd, read that,and it really resonated with me, because I felt at that point in my lifeI was in high school at that time when they first read that and realized boy.I've been given a lot right. I've been given a lot and continue to be given alot, and so much will be demanded and so giving back has always been at thecore of my values, and so I've always looked at ways o. How do I get back? Idon't I get back and I've been an ambassador to treat rescue mission andDetroit. They have fourteen different homeless facilities and I've alwaystalked to the CEO and a marketing director down there and he said well. Iwant to find a way to get back and you know we were looking at differentoptions and he said well, you know the kids get overlooked here that are inour shelters on their birthdays. They, you know it's not another special dayfor him, and so that's fun. The idea of doing birthday, cakes- and I started itabout two years ago- two and a half years ago, and I would literally godeliver these birthday cakes anywhere from three to thirteen a month down nowand just you know, walk in with the cake and the neat thing is, you know wedon't have a sponsorship with with Casco, but I would love to because theyhave these nice sheet cakes right great. Then they feed like forty people, andso when I walk in with one of these everybody's excited, because the otherkids are like everyone's getting some yeah everybody's get it's not just hisbirthday, we're getting cake today right, and so we did that, and it wasjust a great way to give back to see the excitement of the kids to know thatthey were honored in their special day, and you know: Er everybody from oneyear old, kids to fifteen sixteen year old, kids. Ever in this homelessshelter we had to stop, unfortunately, because of the pandemic, but we'relooking to resurrect tad again and get going again with that because it wasyou know it's to me. It was special to be able to give back and just say thankyou for what I've been given, yeah or important to me now. That's awesome.Thank you. I think of your being here my pleasure, and if people want toreach out, if they want to copy of your book, if they want to watch yourprograms if they want to learn about there so much purpose point if theywant to company's book you as a speaker how many times I know there was ovidbut the year before, how many speaking engagements yeah I did in two thousandand nineteen I did on over a hundred and forty speaking engagements wow lastyear during the pandemic at it seven. So I was painful, it was very painfulstarting to get more and more now in the topic of my presentations is suddenchange. In other words, I speak about facing change about leading change andcommunicating change, which is a pretty important topic right now. All right,we'll put all those links yeah the in the show now yeah, you know, Kurt DavidCom is easiest because that connects to all the others as well Gotcha all right.Thanks again, current yeah, my pleasure...

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