PurposeCity
PurposeCity

Episode · 2 months ago

10: Podcasts and Goldfish

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

We are told this sound-bite generation has less of an attention span than goldfish, then what explains the explosion of long-form media such as podcasts?

How are non-profits, businesses, and local citizens benefiting from podcasts? What is the future of podcasting?

Learn the answers to these questions and more from guest Rob Johnson, Founder of Wayne Media & Speakeasy Podcast Network.

www.speakeasynetwork.com 

PurposeCity is presented by Executive Wealth Management and exemplifies our core values of trust, community, and compassion.

PurposeCity can be found at ewmadvisors.com and all major podcast platforms.

Welcome to purpose city stories ofhumanity in action sponsored by executive wealth management. Yes, onpurpose city, do not necessarily reflect an endorsement of ExecutiveWealth Management, rob what's happening. What does podcastand Goldfish mean to you yeah? So I think a lot of people have apresumption that, because podcasting is such a long form mediumand we live in a very snack size, media society that they're not compatibleright, but I think for us, podcasting is a way to go deeper andlonger on a particular topic that people might not have the opportunityto do in a new setting or in a social media comment section, which is alwaysa hell of a good time. Right I mean even it's frustrated me that even Ilike so my news for the day, is I scrolllike my phone with Yahoo, headlines, yeah and I'll pick. What I want, sothose are little sound bites, so I kind of like a soundby world, but then you want to hear the story so I'll, listen to on the radioon the way and just hear what's going on in the world, serious X M and allnews channel- and I still don't get it because in seven minutes, they're justrepeating sound bites for twenty four hours, so the gold fish referenceobviously is. I don't think we actually know the tension span of a gold fishright and honestly. If it is five seconds eight seconds or ten seconds,you know good for the Goldfish. Do they really need a long attentions?Pan, I think, is the question of the day right. So this is nothing against Goldfish atall. Right yeah. This is comparing to the average person supposedly havingshort attention spans and even if we narrow it down. Besides, all of us havebecause we're used to sound bite media and what not, but it's even a knock onmillennials and younger generations that they almost, I think, unspoken.It's an insult that maybe that's all they can handle yeah. Yet they're theones just skyrocketing this long for media of podcasting. How does that? How does that equal outer make sense?Or is there another conclusion we can come to about like the youngergeneration? No, I think, I think, when you look at the younger generation andagain this is pining with a broad brush, but a lot of younger individuals wantdepth on the topics that matter to them right, it's kind of like you can be areally good generalist or you can be a specialist, and I feel, like a lot ofyounger people are in the specialist category where they want to be a partof things that matter to them that they feel like they have a part in and withpodcasting. Specifically, this really...

...started, I would say, as a movement in the twothousand and thirteen era, when cereal was released, which was a show from this Americanlife, and it really captivated people and being invested in a long form storythat they felt like they could be a part of, and that was an investigativedocumentary style leave you waiting for the next episode, unraveling the serial killer case right yeah. So itwas the case of a non SIA D was a case in Baltimore Maryland. That was tried,bet, one thousand nine hundred and ninety nine two thousand and one andbasically, what they did was they put together? What I call and any time Ihave like a new engineer or someone that's coming into the company- Iinvite them to listen to that podcast, because it was a master class inediting the whole thing. The way it's done, the just it's beautiful thecontent of side. The way that they put it together is just phenomenal, whichis why I want so many awards, but basically it's an. They did somethingdifferent. They released all twelve episodes at once. They didn't, theydidn't make people wait and they just released it as a season, and then itwas the most downloaded podcast that year it was just incredible how theydid it so that that brings in the undemanded yeah that you don't get withother forms of media. It's going that way, so the streaming of you know theHolos and the Netflix or whatever, but that people are being accustomed to notwaiting at someone else's whim of when to hear something what they're going tohear or view. But you can pick and choose when and what you want on demandand that's I I compare this to a little bit. I had a dead that was a barber andI called them old school barbers, where they're kind of dying out likedinosaurs, the barber shops, have turned into Unisex shops that have turned intofancy hair salons in barber shops are just some left over old guys at the endof town, and it smells a little weird and but then you get the same, hair cutat all of them and I it's a very masculine experience, but it's a dyingbreed, but in fact it has come back, but in a different way and going to a barber shop is become a coolthing. Yeah they do all the cool beer trimmingsthey do all. This is real hip, modern comeback of the barber shop and I thinkof that and radio I used to be in radio years ago, and I think well, that's amedium going out. Television is replaced, it streamings, replacingtelevision and who wants radio anymore yeah and there's still a place for radio. But this is just a to me. It's like thebarber shop thing, it's a new recreation of how to do it. Yeah!That's a really good analogy. I think I think what people are finding is thatthere are ways to be more invested in industry with being narrow, rather thanfeeling like they're being broad yeah and even podcasters that we have comeon and they yeah they say. What's the quickest way to ten to fifteen thousanddownloads, and it's like well, it's not...

...necessarily about the number ofdownloads. It's about the it's about the engagement of the listeners thatyou have like for my show. I'd much rather have a hundred dedicatedlisteners than a hundred thousand listeners that don't do anything rightand that's the that's. The community experience that podcasting gives peopleand that's what a lot of people miss is. You are building a community of peoplethat want to be attached to what you're doing yeah, so it in mainstream media they're, trying toappease everybody in their programming they're cramming in let's cook somefood. How do you give a recipe? Then they go into what's happening in theMiddle East and in Third World Countries and with terrors, then theytry to mix in a little bit of sports for those people and who's concernedabout the weather and it just it's got to be fast short, quick and it's alittle bit for everybody, and then what you're saying is like this isn't trying to get everybody happy.It's like what, if you're, just into whether yeah, what if you're in ameteorology? What, if your storm Chaser, then there's a podcast for stormchasers and you don't go mile wide inch deep, you go inch wide, a mile, deep,yeah, exactly exactly and podcasting is given people the platform to do that.To go deep, to have long form conversations, we call it pirate radio!You can really do pretty much anything that you want and talk about anythingthat you want host anywhere, that you want have whatever guests that you want.There's no there's, no top level media restrictions that are stopping you fromdoing that. Right and at least at most levels, there isn't the concern for wegot ops our sponsors. Is it it kind of a backward trend where, if you are successful enough in the niche andwhat you decide to talk about, sponsors will want to be on that, but you're notat mercy too exactly exactly. It's switched the power playyeah and that's it's really interesting bill. Bur was one of the first,probably well known, podcasters hat started in the two thousand and six twothousand seven time frame and he's still going so it's fourteen yearslater he treats sponsors very poorly and it's awesome becauseand they expect that they want that. So he is very much shifted. The way thatsponsors relate to podcasts and a lot of shows have done that where they havean audience, they have a culture and it's the sponsors job to fit into thatpodcasters community, not the other way around, and it's pretty really unique.There's, of course you always have you know the corporate. You know anyone,that's listen to a podcast understands, Casper, mattresses or whatever. It isaround every podcast right. So those people do have demands, and but it's,but for the people that are doing it and building a community from theground up. They don't have to play by those rules that typical radio showshave to right. How many podcasts on average, you think are out there.Today I was millions so there's so. Basically the way it works is that themajority of podcast don't make it past...

...episode, Fifteen. So with that there'sover a million podcast in circulation, but I would say the the number ofpodcast that are listened to frequently, that are past. The fifteen episode mark,probably below a quarter million, so they would dump out because the lack oflisteners, Ip okay, you just landing or people. I can't really want this coolpodcast. I have this idea and or kind of like yeah. I think I think it's thatI also think it's kind of like that diet, mentality of, like you know, I'mgoing to go to the store and get all this I'm on to get everything ready andthen, when it's time to Exeo you're like all right. I can't do this right.You know funny ones are good, so I that's what I think that's what a lotof people do is I get really excited, but they don't have a plan to be a longterm in consistence. So the millions were, if you say, there's a millionright now, that's a fluctuating number. They come and go, but that's about.What's out there yeah yeah, you can find about a million any of the podcastlistings. But when you talk about consistency, it's less than a quartermillion and I then is it. I would assume this, but I don't know isthe majority of that, because I think why would I start a podcast? Well, Idid, but why would a star podcast when there's a million out there, but besides some leaving? Is that mean thata lot of them is there just this majority of like hardly anybody'slistening and then successful ones in a small percentage? Yeah, it's veryspread out. So when you talk about success, you have to talk about whatcategory are they in and how do they define their success? So he took mynational shows talk by Adam Corolla, Joe Rogan, anything the NPR puts out. There is freakonomics, so those areshows that have national success because they have a national audience.They've been established for a decade or more. When you talk about micropodcasting, when businesses are starting when small, you know withsmall shops, are starting, you look at, you know they hit a thousand downloads,that's successful, because the they're not trying to be national they'retrying to be local right. So I would say that the bulk of podcastthat I see the successful or ones that have consistent plan. They have overfifteen episodes and they are doing things actively, whether it's throughsocial media or email, to ensure that they are tapping into their audience,they're listening to their needs and they're, putting out frequent content.That is good right. This is a little flash back to the gold fish thing, butthe younger generation I mean there podcast right. So you mentioned NPR sofifteen year old, on the average or not listening to Empor podcast is, I hopenot, but yet the younger ones are themajority. Aren't they that are pushing these out yeah and they're? Justtalking, sir, I mean if I was fifteen again, I think about it. Youknow when I was young, I do know if you did, but you we had tape, recorders andthere's a thing called cassettes and would record ourselves and play it backand then in tenth grade. I think I was a first one of any of my friends thatour family had a home video camera, so...

...we're making many movies and and ifthere was a platform that you could just we had the dining were Osmondmicrophone because you could broadcast your own radio am station in your house.You know I had a little pull, it was white and you pull out antenna, but ifthat could go out to people, oh for sure would be doing it. Yeah and I wouldn't be thinking about not asponsor in a brand, but I would be one of those millions right. I just starteda podcast in my house, I'm a kid, and I'm talking about, I probably wouldhave been talked about video games yeah on my pc with a green vg, monitor yeah yeah. It's it's interesting to see howthe platforms have evolved over time and what I'm seeing right now in themarket. If people are getting, I will use the phrase burnt out on consumerdriven podcast, because there's a lot of choice. So what you're, seeing nowis more and more people are listening to podcast every year, so over ninetymillion, just in the states that have listenedto a podcast in the last year. So it's a very familiar media and what we'reseeing is the quality of shows. The demand for quality is moving up. One ofthe reasons why I started the podcasting before I even had you knowspeak es. He was. I listened to a lot of shows that I liked the content wasgood, but the audio sucked and I was like well. If you can't get the audioright, you can be saying the most profound thing in the world, but no onewants to listen to it, because your audio is not clear. It's got to be abetter way to make podcast that are streamline efficient and have goodsounding audio and consumers are not tapping into that,and they want that quality. Conversely, when you look at businesses, businessmarketing or business podcasting is ten years behind where consumers were sothat's one of the most interesting things is seeing how businesses aregetting into podcasting and they're, not looking for a national awareness,they're looking for podcast that are either internal, so a CEO that has athousand employees that wants to have a vocal recognition to their employees tohelp with retention updates, make people feel like they're, more part ofa big company or a small business. That's bringing in their partnersnetworking individuals to help them understand more about what they do toestablish more credibility, they're, not looking for thousands of downloadsthey're, just looking for a credibility check, yeah, so we're recording. Now it you're the owner of a speakes podcastright in Michigan. You have one in Louisville Kentucky. What are themajority of the podcasts that are on your in Your Business? Yes, a lot ofthe podcast are network are small, the MIN level businesses we have a coupleof hobbyist shows that are running. We have some lifestyle shows some wellnessshows, but the majority or business owners that are looking to establish adeeper network bring on partners, establish more credibility and also useit as a medium to produce more social media content to help them just producemore content in general yeah. So this is Your Second First Louisville Kentucky your. What else are you expanding to?You were telling so sterling heights, so sterling heights is online as ofnext week.

So that's really exciting. So a podcaststudio on the east side. They have two studios out there, just because it's amuch bigger populace I'd, say and then we're planning out Ann Arbor, next yeah,so you're a business and it's growing fast and expanding primarily business,as you said, primarily Y. Ah, AH, do you see this continuing? Is it a fadthing? Why did you start it as a business or what were you doing before?Is it just a model for you or do you? Is there more of a mission behind itand getting people's voice out there yeah? So one of the reasons that Istarted it- and this is you know one one main component of our company isjust full transparency and one of the hardest things about us is as when Istarted Wang Media, which is our marketing company. Small businesses are tired of talkingto marketing companies. It's a you know. Let me get you the top page of Google.Let me you know, and just there's so much noise. I love podcasting. I'vebeen in it since two thousand and thirteen, and I think podcasting is amedium that offers some pretty attractive things to businesses, namely you can get five to six pieces ofcontent off of one show. Video audio transcript photos, guest networking,there's just a lot of things that you can make from it. So when I had, theidea for speaking, is yea. I wanted something that could be an attachmentto our marketing company to help businesses create that content in interms of it being a fat. I think audio podcasts over time will always have aplace because they're so nice for for when you're in transit, when you're onthe go. It's really nice not to have to watch a screen to to consume content.That's why audio books are so popular. Video podcast are going to keep Rarising in popularity because it's offering a medium for people to see theindividuals that they've connected with through the audio platform right. So Ithink over time it's going to be just more developed. I think you're going tosee a lot more S. I think you're going to see like facebooks adopting what Club House did so club house wasan audio only application. They didn't save anything. There was no way toreplay recordings. Mark Zuckerberg, sat on the Board for a club house, and hetook the club house idea and started facebook audio rooms. So then, you'regoing to see a lot more social media applications diving into the podcastingfield and trying to you know, make their own little mark on it. Butpodcasting is a medium, whether it's video audio, I think it's here to stayyeah. I listen to podcasts, but I like when they have video, even though Idon't watch them, I kind of like to see it to get it going like who are thesepeople were doing and then I don't look at it and I just listen to do my workout or I go for my walk or whatever I'm doing and well. You can then play the video ofwhat you saw while they're talking back and forth in your hat. It's I do thesame thing. My watch like Rogan I'll watch the first. You know ten fifteenminutes and then once they're talking...

...like I can, I can do the screen cuts inmy head. Yeah there's nothing else to see. You know what they look like. Youknow the setting now you're just listening to their voice, yeah and asfar as listening so isn't that there's an intimacy in a closeness thatpodcasts bring that makes even the audience development different than Ithink any medium before it yeah. Well, it's on cut, I mean for the most part Imean you can obviously ed it podcast and you know, take out. You know blipsand Cheer Creeks and knocks on the table and what not, but we keep all ofour knocks in yes, if anyone's notice, we keep all the chair- creeks, yes,very important, so so full test Johnny. So when we, when we have a medium like this, it'suncut, it's unfiltered, it's a lot more personal. I think that's why peopleresponded to this platform. More is because it's not highly produced inthat it's a television program with you, hundreds of thousands of dollars inproduction budget. I it's a very real look and that's why I think businesspodcast are going to keep growing a popularity, because it's a very reallook at business that we haven't done before. There's really no way to see a businessfrom the back end transparently. Now, with podcasting and video podcasting.There is it's a real look and it seems more intimate, especially when you'relistening, because this medium is mainly listened to through headphonesyeah or when you're alone. This isn't something you usually share with peoplelike listening, the podcast is a very personal thing and I think you'retalking about audiences, maybe not being big but small, because it's atargeted, maybe interest, but I think you end up drawing a relationship quicker with thehost or the program, because it's just feels, I think more one on onesomebody's right in your ear: Oh yeah, talking to you and giving theiropinions or whatever it is, and information- and I mean it's not one onone, but I compared to him. This could beI'm just weird but like if I'm by myself at home or whatever. I almostprefer to have a live program on like the news in the background, what I'mcleaning, because I feel like I'm not alone right, because it's live, eventhough it's the same as if I was watching it on demand Netflix sure, butthat feels lonelier does that make I've never thought ofthat, but yeah that does make sense. It does make sense and, like I love thehistory channel but they're all recorded, but if I'm feeling like kindof a loan- and I don't want to be- I put on like a live news- even thoughnot watching it- and I think even if podcast are mainly recorded and whatnot,but there's that feeling of it's not companionship. But it's. You is a feeling, a community. There isa feeling of community when, when you have that for sure, and that's one ofthe one of the biggest podcast networks in terms of volume, is I'm not familiarwith Kevin Smith. He do like the movie,...

Clara Call Hits and what not. He as apodcast network, called Spoda t and he put on a lot of shows in one of theshows on that network I really enjoy and- and they comment all the time thattheir listeners when they go and do meetups so they do live, shows they've,gotten pretty big. Now people feel like as if they already know them right,like I've known you for ten years, but it's awkward because I don't know youlisten complete stranger, you know, but it's but that's. That's speaks to theintimacy of because you're revealing very personal things. It's almost likea weekly update of Your Life Deben on how you do the show right and thatmakes people feel very attached which for branding and marketing, is aperfect thing to keep consumers at the ready in terms of just the best media forbrands. There's a I don't know. If you'd call in a negative, it seems likethere's a maybe a positive in then a I don't know. If it's a struggle or apotential struggle and where podcasting is freedom, you have theequipment you hook up. You can say and talk about what you want, yeah, which that's not the culture we live atright. I gonna go to political, but do you know if that's already a situation?Well, it is with social media's not living on their platforms right. But doyou see like regulations coming in where it's not going to be so free?Because we don't want to hear or others don't want to hear all those freethoughts and opinions? I think I think with podcasting specifically becauseit's always been marketed as pirate radio, even like when Steve Jobs back.I think it was two thousand and six when he was premiering one of the ipods.He showed how easy it was to create a podcast and garage band and apple hasalways had a very, I will say, open door in terms ofprivacy because they want things to be. They have that pirate radio mentalityas a business. Now I don't know if you remember or not- and I do want to gotoo much into the politics of this, but Alex Jones was struck from a ton ofdifferent podcast networks, almost all of them because of some comments thathe had made, I think revolving or the sandy hook thing, but the the biggest thing that I'veseen is that podcasting is never going to be a medium. That's going to havethose restrictions because it's so easy to set up hubs elsewhere to do it sothe first hint like that was a big thing for networks to take someone offof their platform, because it makes people feel that way. It makes peoplefeel like they're, going to be in a position where someone's going to takeaway all the media that they've created, and I think because of how it wasinitially set up- that's a line. I don't think they're going to want tocross because someone else can go and duplicate the same process right. Soit's interesting yeah. So, in your experience having hosted podcast, youhave a business, letting other people host podcast, several of them. I know if there's specific stories, ifyou have or a specific podcast, but I see a value in this and even what we'retrying to do here is highlight people...

...what they're doing in communities. Itopens up a whole connection to highlight things that aren't what media covered is not front pagestuff nobody's, shooting anybody and doing you know you can talk aboutsomebody helping somebody yeah. You can talk about just a neighbor, helping aneighbor in a community and put it out to the world to listen to or whatbusinesses do and they're not putting it in their PR plan, they're justhelping their community. Do you? Do you see that, as like personalrewarding, to give a platform for that? I think so. I think like it's to me.It's really nice to see the creativity of business owners. I feel like whenyou're, when you're starting a business or when you, when you're kind of in thethroes of it right you get into this position where your you're kind of in the day to day andpodcasting has given people even when you- and I were talking about your show,a opportunity to be different. Think outside the box and you've done areally good job of that and being able to highlight different people. It'sit's very encouraging to see one that people want to do that and to that there's a media platform intwo thousand and twenty one that allows for that that it's not so much tiedinto you, know Roi or just the business oryou know just sound bites, it's more a long form. It's more personal andpeople want that, and that's encouraging to me when you, you said you've been doingpodcasting a long time. Is that personally, you liked it as a hobby oryou were in college and it just kind of be a mere thing. Or so I startedlistening to podcast right about twenty eleven. It was when Kevin Smith stoodup his network. They were like got my attention. Two Thousand and thirteenSyria came out, and then I had started doing some writing and in two thousandand thirteen I was invited on a podcast talk about an article I had written andin two thousand and fourteen I was like I'm just going to do, go off and startmy own, so I started a show that was got pretty popular and then over time.I moved into the financial space, did a show on that at about eighty episodesand then, as I was wrapping up my Mba, I was like all right. I want to takethis idea commercial and side into this marketing business that I want to startand it just keeps kind of history from there. So it's so, I think I've I thinklike on the dock. I think I've done about six hundred episodes. So it'sit's been. It's been a very much a labor of love, so I, where do you see where you hoping likeYour Business, goes or even the future of podcasting like now we're at it's,not new? It's kind of new in the explosion of it. Yeah right and is it going to O, you think, continueto grow with like startups or kids in...

...their bedroom and stuff, or do youthink, there's gonna be a point where it levels off and there's like acertain level of professionalism. That's expected that follows a crowd oryeah. I think what you're going to see over time is, I think, you're going tosee startups starting a business alongside of a podcast. That's for tworeasons: one. It gives them a long form opportunity to tell people their message and mission in an audioformam. That's someone happened to read it and to it gives them credibilitygives them a voice. It gives them a face to the business which just helps so many different ways. I think thatfor speak, easy, my goal from the beginning has been very one road. I want to be the biggestpodcast network in the country. I think that's a network. I think that is aservice that's been widely under utilized. I don't think a lot of peopleare doing it well, so, even in Michigan, when I saw acouple shops that were doing it and the results are the things that wereoffering like there was just some common sense things that I thoughtcould be injected on the business side. That would help so that's always been. My mission is tojust keep starting serving people well and then, just over time, we're goingto keep growing organically, just because I think of how it's structuredand how well we treat people. That's that's. My biggest thing is theemployees that are here like. If we don't have good service, we don't havea business. I can't I can't even work with you as a client right. If I don'thave good people that are working with me, it's not going to work yeah and youwant to keep us because I'm going to be your biggest podcast, O ye, soabsolutely yeah yeah, and I think I think it's it's a testament to growthrough wellness and it's not a matter of you know total world domination, oryou know it's just. We want to keep serving people well and having a biggernetwork to serve, and that involves growth yeah. You know like to wrap thisconversation up, going back to kind of the theme, podcast and Goldfishbeing that podcast long form audio. But yet welive in a soundbite generation, and you know these whipper snappers can't payattention for more than five seconds at a time and they're all distracted. Doyou agree with? I think I think kind of the opposite. I just think it shows adifferent way. We've been taught to think and that there's so muchinformation yeah we and the younger generation especially has a gift oflike a computer that can process a whole bunch of data and get to that.One document that they're looking for yeah that that the shortage, what wecall a short attention span is a sifting process. I'm not interested,I'm not interested, I'm not interested, but I'm not any less smarter than ageneration before me. But I want to know and understand these few thingsand I'm going deep where the opposite might be a lesser. Intelligent personwould want to stay at a shallow level yeah and be a Goldfish yeah, sorryGoldfish, but they do stay shallow. I think I don't think they're in the deepyeah now the fish ball hes t n the fish.

Well, I think I think to that point Ithink millennials are the most widely criticized generation, largely becausethey've been the generation that has grown up in the area of social mediaand because of that they've gotten such a negative rab, because you knoweveryone wants to paint with a broad brush and it's like well look old manyou're on facebook, criticizing someone for not working while you're, notworking like pickolet. I need people to just be specific. Likedon't know broad brush like there's, you will find good and bad in every agegroup demographic you can find it and you can also takeone person, try and make an example of an entire generation which is prettyfoolish. So I think it's a, I think, specifically for the people in my agerange, which I'm thirty one. I know where thatclassifies. I think that's still millennial for now, but I think in thatrange people just want specificity. They want they want connectioncommunity. I am not particularly interested in fast food, sound bitesand headlines Right. It's just not an interest to me because I want I want toknow what I'm talking about and just not know about. You know two sentencesof the USA Today article so I've been waiting. This wholepodcast to say this, but I think we both can agree that every one having an attention span nowof gold fish as a bunch of carp. Yes, I like that nice all right and that notdead joke of the week all right. So how can people find youin your business if they're interested in a starting up a podcast yeah so forthe podcast? It speak es ye network, all the pricing rates. We even havevirtual services. So, if you're, not in or near one of our studios, we havevirtual packages and kits that we can send out and help you get rolling remotely sospeakes he network and all the details are there speak easy comes along withplenty of Whiskey, absolutely all right, thanks for that's old forester, butthat's good. It is good all right and wherever your favorite podcast platformis please subscribe and to like and share with others. So we can help thisgrow. This has been purpose. I he's brought you by exact wealth managementand we will close out learning a little more about what they do thanks. We are in a period of time of intensein continuous change. People who want to build wealth need to know that aninvestment philosophy and process is critical to any long term investmentstrategy, so clients when they're, looking at their portfolios and they're,seeing to markets move in a very negative fashion or even in a positivefashion, and we want to make sure that we're taking advantage of what themarket of doing so we're, building we're defending and were advancing thatstrategy through compassionate growth. We build defend in advance, that is thefounding principle of our investment philosophy, client, knowing that theycan be up at one level of risk and very...

...gradually reduced. They on a nonemotional analysis is mathematically driving. It is based on of the systemthat is built for a very large community. Our team is built up of notjust a couple advisers with their assistance like you'll see in a lot ofoffices, we have our investment team here, an investment policy committee.We have our operations department here we have our compliance department. Herewe have a technology department here which allows our advisors to have moredirect access which allows them to not as to jump through as many hoops whenthat just leads to a more efficient clint experience. I wanted to be partof a company that had and fostered that team work that had regular meetingslike the case studies, the collaboration, the practice management-I saw a ton of value in that being part of a team is crucial for me. I camefrom almost twenty years in the banking channel. Thinking about why I came herewas specifically to do with the way that they treat the employees as family.We have a great culture here. That's one of the things that I really takepride in. It is about chemistry. You need people to want to be here. Thefact that we're treated so well allows me to focus and other things for ourclients and how I can help them, and what I really found special about thisplace was that the emphasis I'm building relationships- and that issomething that I've carried into my practice as an advisor. I want to buildthat plan and then obviously allow us to defend it, but ultimately is thatpeace of mind that we're in Helim advance going forward, I'm the partnerto the investor. With inside the firm, I really enjoy answering clients,questions a lot of our clients like to read thoroughly through our disclosuredocuments, and they have a lot of excellent questions, and part of my jobis to ensure that the client is informed and has access to thatinformation. So, if there's ever a time where a client has a question and ifthey just want to give me a call, they are always welcome to do that. Wecommunicate with our clients. We are following up with clients when they askquestions, we want to make sure we're proactive and doing that, and that'spart of our strategy of building and defending an advancing or ourrelationship. I've been working for executive boff management for over tenyears. I love the people that I work with with great clients, our clientstrust us. We care about our clients, building report folio and yourretirement, defending it when it needs to be defended in difficult times andadvancing it. When things turn build, defend, advance schedule, anappointment to day and meet with an executive wealth management adviser tolearn how we can build defend in advance. You are investment future. I.

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