PurposeCity
PurposeCity

Episode · 2 months ago

15: Come Together

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

PurposeCity's 'Come Together' episode was recorded at the Brighton Walk to End Alzheimer's! Chuck Gaidica (broadcasting personality), Jennifer Lepard (President / CEO of Alzheimer's Association Michigan), and Nicole Colley (Development Manager of Brighton Alzheimer's Association) discuss the importance of communities putting their hearts, mind, and time together for a worthy cause.

Partaking in this year's walk was Team Suzy, whose website you can find at https://www.teamsuzy.org/ Part of Team Suzy is our very own advisor, Jimmie Plaskey. Also at this event were EWM's Butch Herzog, Colleen Barnes, Lisa McCormick, and Alissa Earl.

Executive Wealth Management is proud to be an annual sponsor of the Brighton Walk to End Alzheimer's and present Chuck Gaidica as the emcee.

This is purpose city. Stories ofhumanity and action presented by Executive Wealth Management guests on purpose city do not necessarilyreflected endorsement of executive wealth management. All right, welcome to the purpose city, if it sounds a little different. Today we're outside for the first timeon the streets of downtown Brighton and we're calling this one come together. There'sa lot communities can do when they kind of put their minds together, theirhearts together, their time together. A little Saturday morning here. It's abeautiful day and we've had all sorts of the community and downtown Brighton come togetherand a few people have come together with me and I'm actually going to handthis over because his professionalism outweighs mine and he's a and and he's an expert, unfortunately, on this topic, as it's at him personally, which isthis is an altimer's walk. I walked...

...into all timers and he knows thepeople at the table even a little better than and I do. So checkADICA. Well, it's good to see you again. Yeah, thanks forbeing back on a beautiful morning. You're right, I took a piece ofyour candy and I'm trying to go through that, but what a great morningfor a walk right and it's just something that is near and dear to myheart. So I was fortunate to be part of the walk at the DetroitZoo and that's coming back again this month. And here we are in this timeof a pandemic, and yet isn't it nice to be near people seepeople being able to healthfully do something, especially outside? But Alzheimer's is ais a cause that's dear to our heart because my father in law, John, suffered from dementia before he passed and my mom, Jerry, had Alzheimer'sand passed a little over two and a half years ago. So we actuallylost my mom and dad within four and a half months of each other fortwo different issues, with each with brain disease, and it's a it's somethingthat makes you take pause. For my mom's journey, it was about sevenyears not quite and didn't see it coming.

Didn't really think that happened. Butinterestingly enough, when my dad passed, and he passed first, it wasa bit of Brokenheart Syndrome. Even with her in the full throes ofAlzheimer's, she knew the day he passed and nobody told her. Wow,and so the power of the human spirit that we can feel when we're atevents like this one this morning in Brighton, and the power of the human spirit. What's the provision that somehow he could touch her on the way out? Is Astounding to have lived through that. And so, as sad as itis and as challenging as it was many times, they're still great hopewhen you see the people that were here this morning, right, Jennifer,oh, definitely this this walk is amazing when you look around and who you'vegot here. You've got businesses, you've got high school students, you've gotjust people from the community and you know, every time I'm at a walk I'malways thanking people for coming and so many times they look at me andsay thank you to me because it's such a sense of community for them.But this, this Brighton is just kick...

...and Butt, if I'm allowed tosay that on a podcast. They are the number one team in the stateright now in terms of reaching their goals and that awesome. It's amazing andit honestly doesn't feel like covid hit this town at all. So congrats toNicole who led this great event, and it's terrific. And Nicole, fromyour perspective, boots on the ground, because I know I saw the spreadsheet. Your Day starts way earlier than you know US sitting here this morning whileeverybody's out. But you've got to feel really good about where this has goneand how it's succeeded in beyond. Yeah, it's I you know, I inheriteda really great community when I started this walk. I was a volunteerbefore I joined on his staff and it's it's been really amazing to see itcontinue to grow and take new shape and take on new things, and wejust added a lot of aspects this year that are really cool. So bothNicole and Jennifer are the bosses of me today. You know, they getto tell me where to go and what to do and it's it's been areally joyful experience to be part of all...

...timers of Michigan. And we shouldpoint out a Lz dotorg right, because there's so many different ways to giveback. Some people can't walk, but I say that and yet there arekids and strollers and I've seen people in wheelchairs. Right, so there arebut there are ways to give, there are ways to continue to give andto look for a local walk whenever that comes up in your community, orstart one and move the ball along when it comes to fundraising, because we'veheard in the news this year about drug trials and things right. So Imean moving this along is what we're all here for. Yeah, this yeareducate a mat was approved by the FTA. It's the first drug that has everbeen approved to treat the underlying biology of Alzheimer's disease. So it's ahuge first step and we know it's not perfect. It it really is fora very small subset of people that have Alzheimer's disease. But we know thatwhen the first draw comes out there's drugs right behind it and there's an opportunityto kind of tweak that. So we're expecting really good things down the pipeand it's thanks to all the volunteers who...

...come out less raise money, butnot only raise money, you know, because, like you said, everyonecan't walk and maybe raising money isn't for everyone. But we have lots ofopportunities to join us when to do education programs in the community, run supportgroups. We I just talked to one of our volunteers who advocates and whois at the front door of her state legislature often to remind her of whatshe needs to vote for. And we are so excited that we just gotpast legislation that funds the first dementia unit, which means there's going to be anoffice in state government that pays attention to dementia for the first time ever. So we are super excited about that and that's because of all the volunteerswho made sure their Congress people and alighted officials knew what to vote are.And how awesome is it is to hear you say that there's the first everunit, but it took a minute, right, and a number of years, yes, and here we are with what a hundred ninety thousand people inthe State of Michigan that have alzheimers that we know of, right, andyet the numbers are bound to grow. If you just look at the metrics. I mean you know, is we're...

...all aging. We're kind of aginginto a demographic but I tried to point this out from the stage. WhenI look out and I see a see of young people, I'm looking ata dad holding a baby. Right now, it hits me that we're doing thisfor not only people among us who maybe in the midst and the throesof Alzheimer's, but for ourselves and our kids and their kids, right,because we're all kind of moving through life together. Well, chucking the othergood point, you know, it's it's you're my father was diagnosed with milcopyof ampairment last summer. It doesn't just affect my father, it affects meand my sister, my brother, my kids, because there's caregiving to bedone, there's smoke detector batteries that need to be changed that when you goover there you're thinking, how long has eve Ben Listen? It is thebasic sometime, isn't it? And I think you know to realize, youknow, when we talk about hundred ninety thousand people, we also talk abouthalf a million people in the state that are affected. It's caregivers and,like you said, it's unpaid. People have jobs. There's amazing statistics onthe number of people that are forced to reduce their time in the workforce oreven leave the workforce because they need to...

...care for someone, and that's abig financial impact on families as well. So so we've had a marching band, at least one. We've had the cheerleader as I saw the dance team. I was waiting for my big dance number and I didn't come up.I think we ran too long on time. But Nicole, what you were walkingaround a lot because that was what you had to do today. Whatdid you see? Some great stories people you saw, because even dogs arein purple this morning, you know, yeah, I saw quite a fewdogs dressed up in purple. I mean, for me, I there's a lotof people that I talked to like on the phone or maybe via emailthroughout the season and that I just don't have a face for. So it'salways really neat to meet somebody for the first time facetoface and like kind ofknow who they are already, but meet them and see how their families havebeen impacted. But just I think the first time that you see somebody comein and it's like their first walk, right, that look on their faceand that feeling that they have that they've never been here before, but it'sjust incredible to be here. And I just saw so many of those peopletoday and I just love that. And a lot of purple hair, nickeland coded. That's right, that's right. And you know, when it comesto my friendship with can and executive...

...wealth management and then team Susi,who I've got to know family members. You realize that there's the profound natureof how this affects your own personal family and then how the circles do radiateout to even when you mention it, even casually to somebody and someone says, yeah, my mom is in the midst of it, you realize howdramatic this is for so many people. For sure, Nicole, you speakat a quite a few places. Probably, is that right? If, whenyou're in a room or when you address people, do you ask fora race of hands? I do. That's usually one of my openers.So I'll introduce myself and kind of say, you know, I I like peopleto know that I live locally and I'm a local representatives so they don'tthink I'm just from wherever and I don't know anybody. But usually one ofmy first questions is, you know, show up hands. How many ofyou either have somebody in your family or know somebody, maybe it's a neighboror a friend, that's affected by this disease? And Nine Times out often that almost the entire room has their hands raising right. I think it'sa good visual to like when you're giving that presentation, for people to seelike wow, this really is something big and this really is affecting a lotof people. Yeah, if you don't...

...know all the stats, I thinktoo that would really stick with you. Are I know if that's exact number, but it's probably about ninety percent or a nine out of ten people havesomebody affected. Would that be about right? I mean you're seeing that in aroom anyway on the average. And Zero people survive all timers. Yeah, and and really, you know, that's one of the things that wereally try hard to educate people and I've had many people tell me my husbanddoesn't have all shimmers, he just has dementia. There are other forms ofdementia, but none of them have a good outcome. They are all fataldiseases and you know, that's why we really try to encourage people to makesure they get to the doctor, get us us, because the other thingis there are other things that can cause symptoms that look like all shimmers thatare not dementia, and those, some of those, are fixable. Sowe want people, you know, we don't want people to just say ohwell, this is what happens. We want them to go and get assessand see if there's something else that maybe can be treated. But if it'sit, if it is dementia, really start to think through plans and reallyhow they're going to move forward. And is it a cool we're living ina time of technology, you where your...

...watch can tell you, honey,I fallen and I can't get up. I mean, you know there areall kinds of things we can do now that even during my mom's illness,those things were not quite available in terms of assisting her. We had toput grab bars in the bathtub and you know. So we started to dothings to get ahead of that. To your point, and that's a stressfulthing all by itself, are admitting that you need to do that and theneven being the person who sort of knows what's happening at that point and realizing, wow, I'm at this point where I need that kind of assistance.It is stressful on the caregiver's side to definitely so. If people were involvedin this event and there's listening to this, how could they be involved in nextyear, whether this specific one somewhere in the state of Michigan or they'reliving outside of Michigan, how do they find out about the press that up, because even in Michigan we have twenty four walks. Well, we haveseven just going on this weekend. So if you say I'm not that closeto bright and trust me, we can find a walk that is near andsee. Yeah, we have committees for all of those walks led by greatstaff like Nicole. So you can just go to one eye. You cango on Alz dotorg Michigan at list all...

...the walks. It'll connect you.We're happy to connect you with the staff leadership and we'd love to have youjoined the committee. We'd love to have you think about starting a team.If you're not really sure you're ready for that, we'd love to come outto your business maybe do a presentation. You know, one thing we knowabout all the things that we've talked about is how much this impacts workplaces aswell. We're places are impacted when they're employees have to take time off orour late because their caregiving. So we'd like to help educate workplaces as welland if and if walk isn't for you, support groups, education programs, advocacy. We have tons of ways to volunteer. So just go to alztorgand we will connect you. Great all right. I want to thank allthree of you. You have a last word? Check. No, justuse the resources of the Alzheimer's Association and they're important. And when you're onthe other side dealing with a mom or dad or loved one, reaching outand Alzheimer's Association of Michigan gives back so much as well. I have tosay that it helped. I can't tell you how many times I call thetoll free number for help. So they're...

...here to help us. It's notjust please help them, they're here to help us to great all right.Thanks again. And purpose. City is a presentation of the executive wealth managementand it exemplifies our core values of trust, community and compassion.

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