PurposeCity
PurposeCity

Episode · 5 months ago

02: Saving and Enhancing Lives in the Community

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Discover how lives are literally being saved and enriched by two amazing organizations, Work Skills, and Fund-a-Life. 

Fund a life is an organization that was founded by Mark Howell, a (then) 30-year-old Stage 4 Melanoma Cancer survivor who was once given only weeks to live. Mark's life was "funded" by his community who raised hundreds of thousands of dollars as he and his young family desperately sought out options for survival. Today, Mark leads this organization dedicated to "funding lives" through all kinds of major life-altering circumstances. 

WSC, headquartered in Brighton, MI, has provided services focused on helping individuals identify, secure, and retain employment for more than four decades. WSC exists to serve people with disabilities and other employment barriers by offering progressive educational and vocational development opportunities based on a person-centered approach. Corporately, WSC focuses on an individual’s abilities rather than his or her disabilities. 

Purposecity is presented by Executive Wealth Management and exemplifies our core values of trust, community, and compassion. www.ewmadvisors.com  

Host: Host Ken McMullen 

Co-Host: Mike Lay, Executive Wealth Management 

Guest: Mark Howell, Fund-a-Life 

Guest: Julie Smith. Work Skills

 

 

Welcome to purpose city stories ofhumanity in action sponsored by executive wealth management. Yes, tompurpose city do not necessarily reflect an endorsement of executive wealthmanagement, welcome the purpose, city stories ofhumanity in action and today's pretty exciting we have a couple: we have aroom full of people, two different organizations, three, includingexecutive wealth management, and we have a big cheese here from a executivewealth management. The chief operating officer, like lay, if you took outoperating chief officers, so i, like you, have a badge and a side side pieyeah. I even he knows me knows: that's not my not my personality, so yeahthanks can you know we we're excited to be doing this podcast and executiveelth management we've been serving our clients for over thirty five years,both locally and nationally, and just trying to help them reach their versionof financial success right, and i think one thing that's been a driver for usover the years. That's helped us have staying power is, is our focus oncommunity know? Our pillars are trust, community and compassion, and we try tolive that out every day and the people we hire and the people we work with andthe partnerships we make in the community and and part of that. Acouple years ago we started doing something where, instead of just havinga couple organizations, maybe that the ownership likes to support, we startedputting a survey out to our employees. We wanted everybody bought into theorganizations we were supporting right. So we put a survey out and we saidanyone that applies we're going to support that organization. If it'simportant to our people and it's important to us and as that evolved, westarted to take surveys and and kind of decide, okay, how we're going toallocate resources based on where the demand was among our team members, andso today we have two of the organizations here that have have risento the top, just because the great work you guys have both been doing like- andyou know worse to excite here- to talk about that race. Him awareness andlearn a little bit learn a little bit about what you guys have going on, andyou know hear your stories, because this is stories of humanity and actionright. So we have. We have julie smith from work skills and we have marchalfrom fun to life. Thank you. Thanks for having us on a yeah, absolutely no workside, o heavy here, so we've been long standing partners with both you guys.Both your organizations, we've done a lot of great work together and i'm justgoing to open up and start and we're going to start with mark so mark. Whydon't you just give us the who is fun to life? Why is fun to life and tell usa little about yourself? Yeah thanks mike. My name is mark howell, i'm the founderof fun to life and really fun. O life was started in two thousand and twelve.I was diagnosed with stage for melanoma, and the doctors gave me about six weeksto live and insurance was limiting my ability to get treatment and seek outoptions at outside of our regional hospital and the community got intothat and really started about an eighteen month campaign to raise abouttwo hundred thousand dollars and it literally funded my life and traveledthe country over the next three and a half years seeking out differenttreatments, different surgeries, each one kind of you know really prolongingmy life to get to the next step and wouldn't have been able to do that.Otherwise, and so what's kind of made it to or of a safe place. I guess in myhealth journey really just thoughts. You know wow what a gift living in thiscommunity has been, and so many people are not afforded that same opportunity,and so much of it just goes back to their financial restraints. And maybe ihave a unique network of people that can support us that i can tap into tohelp pay it forward and help other people facing similar circumstances. Soyou know...

...really started kind of doing theresearch on hey do other, like organizations like this really exists,and you know there's a lot of great organizations that do very specificthings for people in crisis moments, but really not one kind of catch. Allthat somebody could go to in that financial crunch- and you know maybe avoid to go on me- maybe avoid something elsewhere. It really just relies ontheir network alone, and can they tap into that resource of that organizationthat this is what they specialize in and that's really what the idea offundales was born around as hey give me fun raise your round so that we havethis big pot of money, essentially so that people facing crisis situationscan apply for help. They can come to us and we can vet it out the application,and, if we're able to do so, we can get behind it and you know help them getthrough it and not even just financially but really deliver themhope in some of their darkest moments, and that's really a catch phrase thatwe've really taken a like into a shining light. In the darkest moments-and we use that you know in our kind of our daily- you know journey and dailymessaging, and that's really what we learned to do. So you know really we'vebeen around for about the last four years and you know: we've helped a lotof people just this year alone in two thousand and twenty one, we've alreadyawarded fifteen grants totalling about seventy thousand dollars- and you knowin times like this, where a lot of people are hurting. A lot of peopleneed hope and they need a lot of help and we're able to be flexible duringthat time and help in a lot of different ways. Oh last sum, it soundsincredible. You know it started with your story and i want to spend a littlemore time on that. But then it's created so many other stories right,which is exciting, and i want to hear about a few of those too right. O imean talk to us, maybe just a little bit more you're, going through somechallenging times, and i remember talking to you back then and then oneday you came in and said you had a two or three year old son at the time- andyou said my wife's pregnant with twins yeah right so right in the middle ofall that chaos, you know you're still going on and you know building yourfamily. I just talk about some of the emotions and some of the things thatyour family went through during that time, because that's that's the funnypart about life right. It doesn't wait for us, it just kind of happens, andyou know when i was first diagnose to was two weeks after our first born sonwas born gabriel. He was two weeks old and then i was diagnosed with stagefort cancer and they thought you know: hey you'll live maybe six weeks i waslike whoa. Now, that's a big month. That's a big month right there. Youknow- and i remember going through all those emotions with my wife and justtry trying to juggle it all, and you know we were just lost and thiscommunity really r them rallying behind us, really got us through that time.You know they supported us. They got us through it emotionally financially.Everything else was it no individuals through a fund of life, just the kindof spread viral yeah. It was really. It was really just community membersfrom from our lives in counter community. You know, specifically,there are two families that really got behind it and i'll name drop them andit's barb binkle and don at sandy cortez. You know both from the brightand howl communities. They have local businesses as well and they're kind oflike family to us, and they just said like hey, you know we gotta, we got todo it ever we came to help save his life and they just rallied all sorts ofevents. Big and small. You know to help fund raise as much aspossible, and so you had a six week: diagnosis, m and eighteen months of hospitals andrecovery. So yeah it was, it was like a three and a half year journey of upsand downs through the cancer you know journey in general, so it was surgeries.Treatments failed, fail treatments, you know, travel in the country, doingdifferent things and each one just kind of prolonged my life long enough to getto that next step. But how much total came in about two hundred thousanddollars they raised and it was gone in about two years and it was all gone andwe used it all for traveling to those different places. Staying up in theexpensive hotels to you know, get treatment there, all the medical bills, all the stuffthat you don't even think about. You know, and it's just never. It was nevereven a worry for us. We had our own...

...like just a count. That was the canceraccount, as he called marks cancer account and we just were able to justpay things as they came in and you know we downsized our house. We did.You know some of the normal responsible things. I think you should. You shoulddo or could do. We did those things, but you know we weren't a wealthyfamily by you know nature. We didn't have all that money to do things, and iwas basically out of work for almost two years, so we were able to do allthat and never worry about the financial aspect and just focus onhealing because of the community, so it was. It was crazy and then yeah-and i, like you, said mike and somewhere a down line. Of course mywife was always focused on growing the family throughout he's, like a he'sgonna make it he's gonna make it i'm like. How are you thinking about morekids than i horour dying like what is going on is like it now, but she hadfaith so was good and yeah. You know once we were like two and a half yearsout, we decide to like. Okay, like one isreally going to be the perfect time i mean i could go outside tomorrow andget hit by a bus. So, let's just be faithful when we were strong in faiththroughout that process and we're so we tried to extend our family and ban.Were hit with twins, and so that was an interesting dynamic at play, and butnow you know we're in the clear of that in january i celebrated five years:cancer free, so so yeah milestone. We never thought we we'd make it to andfun o life is thriving because of you know, honestly, because of greatpartners like wm here in the community yeah. It's such an amazing story, justaffer. Every time it gets in yours, like it just puts everything inperspective. Doesn't it who's the first one that you helpedthrough fun, o life? So we did in twenty seventeen. We had a round of twofamilies that we helped initially and both six thousand dollar grants, andthose were our first two and you know we had this little pot of basicallytwelve thousand dollars and we gave it away and it was such a cool thing.Unfortunately, one of the one of the family members lost their battle tobreast cancer last year and a the other family that we helped had experienced aloss in their family and it was a father who ran a small asphalt business.It was on his own and he quickly declined health wise. They didn't youjust kind of came out of nowhere and so the family's income. Everything was allreliant on him. He didn't have you know he didn't have life insurance,he didn't have the things to kind of secure the family. If somethinghappened to him and he unexpectable passed away and the family was left in,you know now the bills not only from his funeral but also like how are wegoing to stay in our house? How are we going to keep our car? How are we goingto have an income, and so we were able to give them that grant of six thousanddollars was able to just bridge the gap, so they were able to at least take astep back and figure out what their next steps were. It didn't fix alltheir problems, but it gave them the relief needed to be able to get jes soso fun to life isn't necessarily pain for hospital bills. It could be, itcould be, but if worst case happens, it's helping take a double tragedy outwhere the family's hurting financially after after absolute dating a yeah, imean. Unfortunately, a lot of our common applicants are cancer and healthrelated diagnoses, that's unfortunately just so common in today's world andpeople. You know they go bankrupt from that stuff. They know it changes theirwhole directory of their lives. So we do see a lot of that, but we also seewe see house fires, we see a loss of a loved one. Like you mentioned, we see.Maybe job loss may be abuse in the family of some kind that they need somekind of a gift to be able to get to the next step. So it really can be. Ourmission is even written in such a general way that we can help in almostany cret. You could have a family with special needs absolutely and they ihappen to know that you get a modified vehicle, simple astro van. I don't knowif they make those any more. It's like sixty sandolas yeah. How does? How does the family do that?No well an oddly enough to use that example. We explain the life yeah right,we want our biggest grant to date was...

...with kind of a local superhero. If youwill his name's larry prout junior and this young man he's, he just hasnineteenth birthday he is. He has had over a hundred and eight surgeriessince birth and he's from the pinkney area. He's almost like anybody in thecommunity. Just knows him he's an awesome human being he's in pain everyday of his life he's in an other hospital literally every week and blesshis family. They have a huge family and he's the one. You know that kind ofkeeps that family going. He has a smile on his face, twenty four seven and he was trying to get some moreindependence. He has a lot of equipment that he has to bring around with himall the time to go to school, to go to the movies, to do anything that all ofus take for granted and we were able to gift him a van of about sixty thousanddollars so that he could have some more independence. He could have the life ofa teenager, more normal, quote, unquote and carry on his equipment and and havea little bit more of a life and he's to this day. He just inspires. You know.Thousands of people he's got a huge relationship at university of michiganand with a lot of guys in the nfl. It's just he's such a cool kid he's somebodythat really puts life from perspective on a daily. So is this your full timething it is. It is i i quit my my six figure normal. Youknow cushy job in july of twenty nineteen to basically go all in fun tolife and and see it through, as it was just something that i just felt acalling to do and a passion to do, and it didn't make any sense financiallyfor us to even try to do that, but we were able to do it and my wife- and ihave just been faithfully following that lead ever since and were able toimpact a lot of life because of it. Yeah i mean. What's amazing is there'sextreme examples like what you went through so then you have extreme lifechange and you're, helping other people full time, which is amazing and otherpeople in the back of their mind, whether it's organizations like execu,both management or fesis. Personally, you know we've got business to do. Wegot lives, the live. We don't have. That's really noble for you, but noteverybody can do that. But if companies help you do your missionand i can help personally, then you know then we're all doing our partwe're doing what we can we're helping people like you help those peopleabsolutely and yeah. We have we've established. Essentially we call itmission partners and we have a few select mission partners that really getbehind our mission in a huge way. That really helps us, run the business andoperate and look forward and plan, because a lot of our fundraising andthings are dependent on events and people showing up to donate, and youknow, as we know, i mean the world can change, and people's income and change,and all of that happens and wm has been a mission partner of arsfor now three years and every year they commit every year. They you know, giveus that that large check frankly and it's it's huge, because it's it'ssomething that we always know is coming in. We can rely on it and our missionwould not exist without partners like exact both management right. So how oldare your kids? They are my old ones. Eight and the twins are four boy girl,twins, lilian luke, and they are twin tornadoes yeah. I was just thinking about growing upwith parents like that or in that environment. How your world view wouldbe so unique, no matter what you go into. If you end up going into law,you're going into some kind of finance or you're going to what are you goingto do cosmetic? Whatever, but it seems like good and breed in you just focuson others that not everybody everybody has an appreciation for family, i meanif they learn that you're there and you may not have been right. The nave nevermet you and we try to be. We've raised right, wronger and different. We'veraised my eight year old son, and i have a very special bond. I mean he. Heliterally is like my superari f. He wasn't born those two weeks before mydiagnosis. I know i would not be here today like that all happened by designon purpose, and he gave me the purpose...

...to just fight on and you know notliving was never an option. It just wasn't right, couldn't grow up withouta dad and he's from day one. We have raised him with that transparentmessage of you are the reason dad is here, and this is what he is trying todo with his life, and he has a very unique perspective of an eight year oldfor sure god yeah. That's that's fantastic! Well,let's transition a little bit. We have another guest here today and we went tohear from youtube julie. Can i just go dry, my eyes, likeseriously, that is a tough act to follow and i've known you for years. Ihave watched the journey and i just want to ask you more questions. Well, you wot amazing things too,though julies so don't don't hide back there. As i say cat can said it. Ithink said it best right. Everyone has to do their part in their space, wherethey're called and they're led to do and what work skills does. Is it'spretty incredible to so? Why don't you tell us a little bit about about that,an organization that i i've grown to love and be a part of and tell us about it sure, do you want toknow who i am ukase. I am julie smith, i'm the development director for thework, skills foundation and the foundation basically supports thecorporation, and we help people with disabilities and other barriers becomesuccessful. That's in a nut, shell really, and heseriously so many things that you said, especially at the end like everythinghe said right when you have people who are committed to you and wecall them vision, partners at the skulls, but the same thing to know thatyou can count on that money because an profit work is awesome, but budgetingcan be kind of tricky because you don't know, what's going to happen right yeah.So how did you get involved? I wor skills. I went on a tour of work skills in onethousand nine hundred and ninety five. When i was on the leadership livingstonprogram and i saw the clients there, they were cutting fum, i think oozedand shipping, and i said i want to work here when i grow up and i have not yet grown up. However, i havebeen at work skills for eight years and i love it, but it's just it's such agreat place to work and you know mark you talked about larry and other peoplewho are your superheroes? That's what makes it so easy for me todo what i do. I don't even like to call at my job right so when i see someonewith a disability or a barrier and they're excited because they get to goto work like i know, nobody in this room has ever said. Oh, i have to worktoday right. Nobody right sure, yeah right both that yeah i but like theyhave such a different perspective right. It's all about perspective, and i saw iso many stories so darrell. One of my buddies has been there for, i think,nine years now i lose track and he has the goals always to get someoneemployed competitively in the community, but if they want to be at work skills,if they would rather be working at work skills, we want them there. So he hastried a couple jobs in the community and really felt more comfortable atwork skills. It's not a sheltered work, space right, it's a supportiveenvironment, and i remember a couple years ago his family travels a lot andthey were going to poland and his mom's all excited and darrell said well yeah.But that means i can't go to work for two weeks. Like really how many of usfeel like that right right perspective for sure yeah, it's funny, because i myso i part owner of executive wealthmanagement. My wife was a special ed teacher and we she stopped to stay home with thekids. We fast forward a couple years later and then julie asked me to be onthe foundation board. So i sit on the foundation board. T for you know anorganization that helps people,...

...disabilities and my wife runs aministry out of our church. That's focused on businesses, so i don't knowhow that happened. But, yes, you do right, we, but were i'm pointing it outthere. It's all about him right, wait. This is not video, but i am pointingupwards right so mark you and christina, and your face got you through right,you and carrie. It's your face me and you know what twenty years i don't knowyou're the numbers, people math. How long was that from ninety five to twothousand and thirteen like faith that some day the time would be right and iwould call work skills, my home yeah. You know it's cool and you're rightabout that. Certainly, is you anyone that knows. Julie knows you do a greatjob of getting people in for a tour, and i don't think there's any way tounderstand what work skills does except going and seeing it at its for sure ididn't. I didn't. I heard about work skills a couple several years ago, andso that sounds like a great organization, that's cool and she waslike. You should come for a tour okay, tour of what you know. I don't knowit's just your office or and then to see the facilities, and just all theenergy in those buildings is pretty incredible. To talk about that. Maybetry to paint that picture for people so that they get a little bit of an ideaof what work skills is because in your head, you think: well they what theyhave low office somewhere. They have a it's a it's a. I was just there likekepis. I was impressed yeah. The offices are as nice as any businessoffice would be right. Big conference re, high tech things, then i'm answering the question for.Thank you. I appreciate i i'm giving a new person's perspective yeah. Then, ifyou want, i guess you call it factory, i don't know, but then right adjacent.You walk through the factory area. That's like a kind of like if you'vebeen in to wear industrial factory, maybe like a car plant or somethingright and then all the workers are there and it's like the happiest placeon earth hayman it is, and so it is difficult and thank you. Thank you.Thank you for coming. Have you been there? I have not that's what i wasthing i was like man. I've just never been invited, so i guess that goes toshow ride. Okay, up we'll check in after this podcast, so work cos hasbeen around for almost fifty years. Looking around the room, i can see. Oneof us was around fifty years ago, so well name names, but we start ahead. Ididn't you, like i laughed when i said,executive well's been around for thirty five years. I'm like you weren't evenborn i was he was born. I just leave it i was for. I was less for i seem to have lost my train of thought,which happens, which is why people don't come for a tour anyway. So thewhole idea is to get people prepared to be successful at work right, whetherit's a physical or mental disability or maybe you're just under employed. Ithink didn't we talk about the ewer, you showed a slide. They had all thesedifferent erres barriers and i noticed one in there. That was how did determine under employed underemployed. I ask what that was, and just people that may not have a disabilitybut heaving a hard time adjusting to work place, envirements just gettinggetting like finding or keeping a job right. So we all have soft skills andworker traits that you need to be successful and there are some peoplewho don't do that really well right, so they can come and get supported andthey understand. Yes, when we say eight to four thirtyevery day. That means eight to four thirty every day, and this is how youcould speak to a supervisor, and this is how to interact with your co work,so it or cool. I thank you, but i had no idea that that part existed a rightand that's for anybody right. So people come and they get the skills they needto be successful so that where we were that's the production floor is what wecall it where they do: assembly work...

...and some packaging things, and but we have seven other divisions. I really shouldhave brot notes right, so we have that's our employment services, whichis at the house the heart of everything wedo right. Our mission is to optimize potential and that's what we do right.So production is a big part of it. We have a home health care division. Wehave residential. You may have seen we're building our second residentialhall right right now we have behavioral services, we have action associateswhich is a staffing division. We have a school in epsilon, w cacademy, which is a charter high school. Look at mark he's like wow no kidding.I'm learning i'm learning a lot kidding and i've forgotten something. So idon't know what i forgot. Oh wait, artists and corner studio was rightright, so i explain that i was so i've seen that building from where we're at.I see it all the time, but i have no idea it was connected to you. I thinkyour artisans are actually part of your program. Yes, and in fact so that's youknow. Another way to become successful is to be paid for being an artist right.I mean how cool is that we actually were recognized by michigan works acouple years ago for in innovative work, force development, because these folkscome to work and they do art and i'm telling you they do really nice art, sothey painting ceramics, jewelry, fiber arts a little bit of everything andwhen their items sell, guess what they got a paycheck. That's super cool yeah,yeah, nice yeah. So so, when you particulars, you couldtell us people that have come in you're. Looking at me as a a no no orwe oh, no, i fusion so that maybe evenjust to be specific. Well, i don't know you don't have to be specific with thenames- i guess, but people they come in that maybe just having a hard time withemployment. They get the coaching and the. How is that process work, or maybe howlong does that usually take? No, that's a re question yeah! No, soeverybody some people who come to us are referred right so or the forservice, so entities like michigan rehabilitation, service, os communitymental health, lesa contract with us to provide services. Okay for people. There is no typical stay and like i'm,not this in you but like there isn't. Everybody has an individualized planwith vocational goals and that's kind of how that works. But i'll tell you alittle story about one of our artists, ans and i happen to have known himsince he was little because i knew his family from church. Of course right and when he came to us, he had astack of note books with drawings of my little pony right. Remember my low ponyand was not real verbal, real interactive. He kindof did his own thing and he started in the art program and he would come andhe would do his drawings and then he would use markers and michele who runs.Artists on corner could see that he he was growing, and so she started withpaint markers. So then he has a canvas he's using paint markers. Well then, because michelle is superawesome at bringing out the best in people and he did not want to paintright, it was a textural thing. He couldn't be around the paint well oneday as turquoise i don't know til, i might have made that up his paintmarker ran out right and paint. Markers are very expensive, so michelle sayswell look, there's a little cup of that color of paint right over here. So hegot a paint brush and literally would stand like two feet away from whateverhe was painting on, because he didn't want to get close to it anyway, we'llfast forward, because this is like a...

...three hour show right, yeah anyway.Since then, garrett now has painted everything he paid in a hugemural in the will at work scales. He panted our cabinet. He has taught otherartisans how to do things like that and help himfinish the projects and he will talk to anybody like he has his on facebookpage his own art stuff, and i literally we cry a lot at work goes like happytears for the most part, i'm sure you never cry over any of you never isright lir, so i was doing it to her one day and i walked in and he was sittingchris cross apple sauce on the floor, painting the cabinet- and i lost itbecause that's what i do so one of our one of our fundraising entities as well,which is the women of work skills right. So we meet twice a year. We always havea participant, speak and garrett and his mom came a couple years ago. He wasour featured speaker and he was up there and again i've known him for everand he did his presentation and had some of his art work after he finishedspeaking. He went to every woman in the room there- probably thirty, thirtyfive women with his business card. Hey i'm garrett, here's my card, we you,like my facebook page like he has his own side gig at home. He has a studioand he sells stuff this a question yeah. Well all that from that untapepotential that i have never been yep aped right, how cool? So? What's themaze? What's the scope about? How many are you serving now baby staff size? Sopeople have a gauge staff size. I think we're right around eighty employees,but then that doesn't include other people we place for customers throughaction associates. We serve between fifteen hundred andtwo thousand people a year. Well as an organization,so you do the math and like i'm not going to do the math, but, like tens ofthousands of people have really completed their journey or like gottenon their way like you can go in the community and see somebody, oh my gosh,that person used to be at work skills, and here they are. You know the signingme in at the salon or something yeah. It's super a cool, so where does thework come from? I mean you talk about these seven different lines of businessand this factory in the studing e. Where are you? Where is the work comingfrom? What kind of work is being done by and the production? Oh, okay, thankyou it could you write that down for me, so people, that's the cool thing. Thankyou right, so they're being paid real money for doing real jobs for realcustomers right, so typically it's companies that would maybe subcontractout. So if they come to us- and we quote it, it's going to be a fair price.It's going to be high quality because we have done work with the automotiveand not otomo ive. For decades again, we have a huge general motors engine racket, recertification program that we run so there's going to be quality, it's goingto be competitively priced and you get the feel good right because you'rehelping people that might otherwise struggle to find a job yeah. Well, iwas one of the coolest things that i learned that i did not know until i gottill i did a tour and i remember, being in the factory seeing this. You knowyou got a production line. You feel like you're in one of the automotivefactories at wow. Didn't even know that was happening just down the street here,i'm brighton well in in thank you for coming like seriously. It is so challenging to connect the debts ofeverything that work skills does so when people actually take the time,make the time to come and visit and see for themselves and meet the cool kidsas i like to caught them like it. Just kind of everything makes sense. Itthere's no such thing as an elevator speech with work skills right. So wheni was there, they were their big bins...

...of metal brackets that hold lighting,trussels or fixtures up or something like pipes, yep infrastructure- i don'tknow quite what they were doing with them, but did you say you'll get like aan order of a million at a time yeah, it's kind of crazy. The amounts differand that's i'm kind of out of that specific lop, but there were times whenwe like the demand was for, like one point, two million of these pieces amonth yeah and anybody can do it right and everybody can do something right,so anybody can do it, that's crazy, yeah and then laura. I think it was was doing somekind of price, sticker labels or bar codes. Is that who it was that iremember that they just take so much pride rightin their work, showing exactly how it's done and right o they're lining it upand so happy doing it. It's a very a very great place to visit thanks. I can,i tell you one more low story and promise i'll be quick. Okay, so bettywho used to be there, the boomster betty boot right, she was awesome andshe would if i were giving a tour, she would come up and one of a lot of a lotof i don't know if it's all, but most of the work that we do in production issafety related. So we do work. We talking with my hands. These differentsized gaskets that go and your gas tank right and we put o rings and differentlittle jabby things on them right and again do thousands of those and how howthey work as they go in your gas tank. So if you get in an accident and youflip over, the gas is not going to flow out, your car is not going to burn upand you're not going to die right so betty, as only betty would come up. Ifi were giving a tour and she would say, hi, i'm betty, i get paid to save lives.What do you do all right, like low fassy, pant ellen issued right? Like inever said hey, you should say this, but it was like. It just makes me happyright because that's what she did, she gets paid to save lives right yeah asgreat a very good. That's awesome! So like what do you do? What your role isa chair person when you guys meet as as a board? What do you discuss? What kindof decisions do you make? Is it decisions? Is it guidance? You know, ithink, i think, and you guys probably both speak to it and you both haveboards for the foundations on you. We get together and just help make surethat the directions clear where it certainly here is a resource in thecommunity to try to connect the dots and connect the people and try to makesure that the things that need to happen continue to happen for theseorganizations. Iled aronimink, both say you're, both done profits, so you'renot selling a thing to make the dollar to do the next thing right, your're,relying on on community support to do great things that, as you said earlier,can we would all love to do and a lot of time. It's a matter of not havingthe time or you know our focus is somewhere else so, and the people whodo have the time couldn't do it without the people who don't have the time. That's really deep, thanks right, isn'tthat right, yeah it takes both. So how could people helpyou it's through the foundation e through the foundation and again right,so the foundation supports work, skills, we're not like fun to life, where wegive money to other worthwhile organizations or individuals. Wespecifically support whatever programs and work skills need the support, so ingeneral to find you what a website i just google julie, smith, google, joesmith, you're, the only one that wikipedia i bet so for real our website is w skills,com and there's a veritable plethora of information. A word about you mark. Howdo they help you or where to find you fun? O life do o work. I can find us inall the social media channels as well at funder and yeah. They can we'realways looking for more people get involved, we're not quite the size ofwork skills t'prairy. Just in my bork,...

...you stand baby, we don't not yet notyet, but no- and i think you know julie waskind of hitting on as well. I think one of the hard parts about being nonprofit is we're not selling a tangible thing. You know we're selling. You knowhope we're selling the ability to get you know somewhere forward, so morepeople more people that come forward to help support us in a lot of differentways, both of us. I think you know it, helps us because we're not always, ithink sometimes people are searching for ways to get involved and they don'tknow that maybe we're looking, but i know that both oranais are alwayslooking for more people to help more people get involved more hands at thetable and it's not it's not always writing a check. It's sometimes it'ssaying you know you're putting on an event this summer and we have a golfouting coming up to raise money and volunteers are always needed. You knowhaving someone to come in and work with the artisans right, yeah just be there.So volunteered time is always needed in organizations like both years as well-and you know you kind of mentioned earlier you're, both really serving asimilar purpose. You're bridging a gap right potentially and some of yoursmight be- you know some of the people you serve might be part of the programlonger term, but either way it's there's a gap in someone's life. That'slimiting an opportunity and you guys both absolutely get to come together tohelp fill that gap, which is which is life changing like, which is awesome.Meeting unmet needs right. Doesn't that what we do absolutely? Okay, so i'mgiving you a shout out because my mice is hat, so i'm no so talked about action, home health careright. So even during remember that what was it a pandemic that was goingon last year right, so our caregivers were still serving clients,twenty four seven right in and out of client homes and businesses andwhatever they needed to do to take care of people. So, of course, we needed alot of personal protective equipment, ppe and we happen to get quite a nicedonation of these masks that say funda life and some other things, and i don'tremember the guy who brought them, but i seriously like thank you and a, but iwill speak for the nonprofit community in livingston county. It's awesome,like i love being a part of this whole community, because we do we providedifferent things, sometimes to the same people, but if we can help each otherout it's what we do like we're, not competitive right. We just we're allproviding support and hope for people absolutely right. No, we were happy todo it. It was it was exciting. I mean we just you know, especially at thattime. We just happened to have a relationship and we were able toacquire a bunch of ppe through some different networks that we had and thewhole goal there was now again like i said we just have our board and one guy.So i was like hey if we can get it in and then we have other worth wileorganizations that need it. Let's filter it out a to find organizationslike yours that could use it, and that was we were blessed to be able to do it.Well, isn't it cool that in a time i mean during the pandemic, when you hadyou know, everything going on business is shutting down. One of the firstthings that hit my came across. My brain was: how are the non profitsgoing to survive, they're primarily supported by individuals and businesses?How are they going to survive? And i know it was. It was probably scarythere for men, but even early on you guys are both out there continuing toserve and continue to help people when so much uncertainty. If you were goingto even have enough money to do the next thing, i mean that's hard right.So with the population we serve right, they already typically feel isolatedright in their homes or wherever they are because they may have a disability,but then, last year, at this time they couldn't go anywhere or do anything, sothey were confined to their homes, twenty four seven and it was reallyreally hard really hard for them. So we, you know, put in some virtual servicesand did you know whatever we could as quickly as we could right, because youcan't do that on a dime right, all that stuff takes money, other crilicbarriers and all of our locations yeah. But we we are here to serve the peoplewe serve. That's why we get up every...

...day, yeah, absolutely yeah. I thinkwhat was what was cool about last year. Is you know the one blessing that i tookaway, and i know both our manatos did? It was when we were faced with that. Iknow a lot of organizations were like well, we we can't ask people for helpnow, because everyone's hurting- and i think we both took the approach of nowas a time where we have to ask for more help, because there are still peopleable to give it, and what we saw last year was the people who were able tohelp helped way more generously than they ever had before, because theyrecognized the need and they came out of the wood work, and because of that,we were able to support more people than we ever had before and in a yearthat made no sense financially to be able to do that, and it was you know,that's one positive, take away from everything that i'll remember that yearforever because of the ability to be flexible and help even more peoplethrough through pandemic yeah, very good, hey. I was a pleasure meeting youmark. Thank you thanks for a talking to yes good to see you again, you am niceto see you we just. I know it at em, we're just so honored to build a partwith both both your organizations and continues for the work you guys aredoing so just thank you and thank you. Thank you. Thank you for your support.A no and i'm liking. I are teaming up on the work skills. Golf outing. Comingup. That's right! I was looking at pictures from last year. Somebody onthat team was not wearing a shirt, but it was nobody recognize it's yeah. Nonames will be named all right. Thanks again, everyone andmike see see you at the office all right and we're going to close outlearning a little more about executive wealth management. We are in a period of time of intenseand continuous change. People who want to build wealth need to know that aninvestment philosophy and process is critical to any long term investmentstrategy, so clients when they're, looking at their portfolios and they're,seeing the markets move in a very negative fashion or even in a positivefashion, and we want to make sure that we're taking advantage of what themarket o doing so we're building we're defending and were advancing thatstrategy through compassionate growth. We build defend in advance. That is thefounding principle of our investment philosophy, clients, knowing that theycan be up at one level of risk and very gradually reduced, as on a nonemotional analysis, is mathematically driving. It is based on the system thatis built for a very large community. Our team is built up, if not just acouple advisers with their assistance like you'll, see in a lot of offices,we have our investment team here in investment policy committee. We haveour operations department. Here we have our compliance department. Here we havea technology department here which allows our advisors to have more directaccess which allows them to not as to jump through. As many hoops when thatjust leads to a mor efficient clint experience, i wanted to be part of acompany that had and fostered that team work that had regular meetings like thecase studies, the collaboration, the practice management- i saw a ton ofvalue in that being part of a team is crucial for me. I came from almosttwenty years in the banking channel. Thinking about why i came here wasspecifically to do with the way that they treat the employees as family. Wehave a great culture here. That's one of the things i really take pride in.It is about chemistry. You need people to want to be here. The fact that we'retreated so well allows me to focus and other things for our clients and how ican help them, and what i really found special about this place was that theemphasis on building relationships- and that is something that i've carriedinto my practice as an adviser. I want to build that plan and then obviouslyallow us to defend it, but ultimately is that peace of mind that we're inhelpin advance going forward, i'm the partner to the investor. With insidethe firm, i really enjoy answering clients, questions a lot of our clientslike to read thoroughly through our...

...disclosure documents, and they have alot of excellent questions and part of my job is to ensure that the client isinformed and has access to that information. So, if there's ever a timewhere a client has a question and if they just want to give me a call, theyare always welcome to do that. We communicate with our clients. We arefollowing up with clients when they ask questions, we want to make sure we'reproactive and doing that, and that's part of our strategy of building anddefending an advancing or our relationship. I've been working forexecutive welth management for over ten years. I love the people that i workwith with great clients, our clients trust us. We care about our clients,building report folio and your retirement, defending it when it needsto be defended in difficult times and advancing it when things turn build,defend, advance schedule, an appointment to day and meet with anexecutive welt management adviser to learn how we can build defend inadvance. You are investment future. I.

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