PurposeCity
PurposeCity

Episode · 3 months ago

05: The Revival RN Story

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Hear the amazing story of how against odds, Erin Jedrusik is living her best life and daily helping others do the same. Erin is the owner of Revival RN featuring cosmetic injectables, anti-aging, and wellness. Also, appearing is spa puppy Coco. 

PurposeCity is presented by Executive Wealth Management and exemplifies our core values of trust, community, and compassion. www.ewmadvisors.com 

Welcome to purpose city stories ofhumanity in action sponsored by executive wealth management, yes to apurpose city, do not necessarily reflect an endorsement of executivewealth management. Welcome the purpose city. Today's topicis the revival, r n story, and i have with me eron jed rusick. You got itthat's right. You got it and with her zog from executive, bothmanagement and we have to introduce. You can introduce who's on the table.Okay, cocoa, which, if you don't know that then you've been hiding in a holeyeah so cocoa yeah. So why would we know that cocoa obviously has a face ofa celebrity? She does have the face in celebrity. Cocoa is our spot copy. Atrevival, arend she's been she's. Two years old, she's been coming to workwith me every day since then, and i'm pretty certain that most people come tomy office to see coco, i'm also fairly certain. That's the only reason youinvited me here today, yeah so we'll get into it, but you doinjectable. That's right. Word right ye the sounded out when i said it a loudso injectable s being face, fill well has magic injectable, but peoplecommonly know bo tax, dermal fillers things like that. Okay and have youdone any of those procedures on coco, not yet she's, only two she's alittle early in the game, but you know then what bribon e e so, but she wasthe runt of the litter, so she's, extraordinarily tiny at three pounds,so they'd be fourteen right when the n not sure yeah, and i always try to especially thebeginning, just turn the conversation towards myself, of course. So this ismy attempt. Is i actually contacted you and asked? How do i get a dog likecocoa at one time? Yes- and i almost did almost but coco's one in a million.However, there's probably about six other out there, since people have metcope right from the same parents, i literally tried to get a fofo like that.So i came close. I use the same. I got the same breederand i totally forgot the breeds name that i had. I don't have the doganymore, but the dog is happy in another home because the dog had, ididn't have time it was a puppy and it did not have the mannerisms like thisone she's very special. This is cannot be replicated. Mine was joy. If youremember, then it was hafer the name. Well, i was asking you about names. Mybras, like, i think, hank. What do you think about hank and then i had joeyyeah. I think i tried whalen. I even did hank three ink three yeah, becausethere's sant lams junior, no, no, no, there's hank, wear and there's hankwilliams junior and then he has a son. He three that does music. I thoughthank three just sounds a little inger. The ink people want to replicate cocoa.It just can't. I literally hit the dog jat pot yeah, because i was a fou, buti can't walk around the dog like that. So i did n't name it. Something like ahank. Three even joey was too cute as kind of leave the dress off and yourgood yeah. I feel, like you can't name a dog after a human name. I just to mewhen i like frank or the ill there's build. I sometimes i think it's cutedepends coco's good name yeah. I got we had a contest to name cocoa. She wasnameless for about a month and a half. I couldn't come up with one, and so iran a contest at worked at a big gina, and then i had thousands of names and ihad to decipher it down, so she was nameless for a while. So i, like you, sometimes is both though, like i namedmy son max, and that was the number one dog name that year almost every yearright, so you can have a human. You didn't tell him that girl. I did. I didn't name him because ofthat, but just have to he have so, which is with executive weathmanagement. What you do there good morning, what do you do and what dothey do? Well? Good morning, everybody. I am aprivate wealth adviser which is kind of a fancy term for a financial adviserover executive wealth management. More or less. We managed the financiallifes and decisions for all of our clients, so we try to make your lifesimpler. Try to be that guide navigate anyfinancial decisions they might have and really in the end we just buildrelationships and and do it for the long term and because you particularly,are the co host. Today i have to ask you a brief history of the company good question yeah, so i've actually been familiar with thecompany ever since i was born, and i was started by my father back in eightyone and some say eighty five still so you'rethe fourth i'm the fourth and he's the third he's. The third and i've beenaround, or at least i've n't seen him...

...operate out of the company for her forthat long. So i i've been kind of keeping tabs, so i came back a couple oyears ago back the time i was in chicago and youhave a dog. I have to what kind of talk one is a new one: birdie she's, a a poodle and a brittany, spaniel, okay,so much energy and the other one is a border collie and husky that i got incollege for free and turned out to be a great dog. That's awesome! I love dogs, cocos trogain, down coco, yeah, coco cd treats can help calm your your hyper line. Okay, so i have in mynotes, if you see, if dogs, with an arrow to c b d, because i saw on yourwebsite, i do my research and i was like well not for my hyper one for myone who gets cards an anxiety yeah, an a help, a absolutely okay we'll takethis off line because i i actually have dog t well, if you playyour cards right, i'm pretty sure my assistants ring up here at the end withthat with some treats for you guys. So, oh good, you coal take some home toyour baby tonight. All right, so yeah tell us about the so. That's partially,besides your dog, being like you're in house, celebrity your social mediacelebrities, she's! No on product yeah, she is now on product, so tree house c,b d is a michigan owned company. They manufacture full spectrum, high qualitycd, which is used for a lot of reasons. I'm sure you guys at least are somewhatfamiliar with it. So a me anxiety, muscular pain, joint stiffness for cocot helps her eat because her appetite she's a little bit of a you know, willnot get so. It's always a problem, a lot of benefits to it for humans and inanimals as well. So we manufacture our own line of cd cream at revile orin. Wealso sell bath bombs. It just is kind of a popular thing pop really like them.They work really good and so for a limited time. They are featuring cocoaon their cd dog trees, which gave me a perfect opportunity to say: let's dosomething really fun and cool at this, which is what i like to do so, theentire month. We turned it into a giant fund raiser for wagon tails, which is alocal animal rescue. So so we get big about coming up in the entire month.Anywhen. That comes in orson by his retreats. We donate all the money, therest ueu and we're not trying to get away some fun things with it too. Sowe're writing cote tails of coco that to help save the save some of thehomeless puppies, this is totally random. But every time i hear see c db,c, b d, i think a cd but didn't hear nowt that culture has to do with music, i'm evenlooking at the peanut gallery behind a its music. You know charlie daniel's band yeah. You know bringing myself backinto it interviewing them once it is outside nashville and in his garage. Hehad like this e s comero or something, and it had a big lightning bolt. Is itcd? Is that the devil went down to georgia? Yeah? Definitely yeah! I got it. I know songs. I don'tknow names we're going to put that on. I hug on down to george be awesome, sothe dog moves hello, coco. She is life. So what? What else do you so revival? Or i yes tell me how you went from a nurse or even what led you to be anurse sir and then to revival rn to expanding to a wellness spy that wholeseries of what motivates you? How does that happen? It happens from. I think, a lot ofdifferent facets right so before i was a nurse believe it. I'vebeen a nurse for seventeen years. I so i've been nursed for seventeen yearsbefore in my previous life before i was acetic injector and specialized in theindustry men now i worked primarily at my children's hospital uf m inpediatric intensive care. I know you're familiar yeah, right, yeah or gas couldhave crossed and didn't. I think that i think that at some point they probablydid, and so i spent a tremendous son timethere. My specialty was pediatrics trauma, nursing and i honestly, when iworked there, i was like i will never leave. I love this job. I'm going to dothis till the day i died. It was both rewarding and heartbreakingright people didn't understand how i could do that. I'd have friends offamily wheres. I don't babies are dying in every day. How do you go to work?How do you do this? These are things people don't see in their entirelifetime. My perspective, i love working in the kids. I've always lovedworking, the kids, everything i've done not now, but everything i've done upuntil this point is pretty much been revolved round working the children and my perspective on that was whetheri'm here or not. These kids are sick. This, because aresick, they're dying. They have these things going on and i'm trained andcapable of taking care of them, and if...

...it was my baby in the su or my teenagerin the pediatric i so i would want someone like me taking care of it, andit's not really about me right, soeur nurse and pediatric ic is so for thosethat aren't familiar with that world and we both are yes from two differentperspective. Absolutely so i knew of nurses in there and got to knowfamilies in there, as i was one of those families at one time, and sopeople get a perspective of what life is out besides outside ofyour own home, as there's families in these icus, that nurses are helpingthat have kids that are growing up, they're of school age and all they'veever known is living in that hospital room, maybe even in a garden bed like almost like an a bubblekind of situation, and i knew one could there. I don't know he's probably tenyears old he's at every birthday there every christmas, so that's been hisfamily's life for ten years, yes and had at plus surgeries in that that'shis whole life. All he knows is living in a hospital in an ice and perfectlyhappy he's. Not if you think of a nice, you kid that's just laying there inthis. No. This is a normal, active kid that has one specific problem that justthey can't quite fix it. They can't quite let him go. He has to recoverfrom something minor. Well, it could be major, but it's a minor surgery, but itjust doesn't take and they redo it and they re do it and the payment familyhas this hope of maybe going home next month and they just never yeah coolsthing about kids. Kids, don't feel sorry for themselves. You throw one ofus in a hospital, but, like i don't feel good, i probably my are kids arelike i'm fine, i'm fine, because they want to play video games. They want toget the hell out of there. They want to go, do something fun right and sothey're, just they're cool kids. So you know so we saved the ton of lives. We lost atime. It was. You know, a double edged sword said, i would say there foreverand then a two kids my own, and that changes things right. So i have nowthey're grown ish, they're still, babies to me, my youngest son isfourteen and my oldest son is sixteen, and my world revolves around these two,these two young men. So when i had them working holidays and weekends atmidnights, probably for the next ten years, because there's not a big turnover in the iu, it's such a specialty right. You know. I chose my kids atsome point in time, and so i always say i sold out, but would i be right insaying- and this is totally a lay person's guest but having been on thefamily side of it? Do you think, did you get trained toextra for putting an ives or do you think you become a more specialty thanother nurses, because special needs? Kids are so difficult to find a vein todo it in a way that doesn't hurt them or scare them. I mean that takes maybe on the job learned to skill. It'san acquired scale. It's something that that comes with time. It's the kind ofskill that the more you do it, the better you get at it, but and in different you know, department,different divisions, differ dynamics, determines kind of how you do that. Soyou know when i worked in emergency medicine, it was unfortunately pittingdown a screaming toddler. Will someone's got his little leg lock, so ican put an ivy in his foot. You do the i s, you know the child might besedated because they're so sick with their uneven a later, so differentdynamics there right in what you do is so serious, because now you havechildren's with problems going under and that causes it whole otherrisk factor of yea waking up properly in the prope. It's a it's a lot. It's a long! It's a lot,and there was this crossover when we work there. So some of these childrengo home right and they still lake care when they go home so and many of them go home andventilators are you know chronic long conditions, premise different thingslike that, so university of michigan had a home care division where there'sseveral different divisions, but one of them was, you know, pediatric care, andso we would provide respite care on the private duty nursing in the home, andthat was a service that you have them provided so a lot of us nurses thatworked in the ic that specialized in this we already were taking care ofthese children. Some of them we had known for three months six monthslonger they spent time with us then would go home. So we would go and do itwas kind of like a like a moonlighting job for us to go to their homes andtake care of these children. So i kind of started doing a little bit of bothand in eventually the department of the home care division offered me aposition as a supervisor for which i quickly said no multipletimes and eventually they talked me into itand in the you know, the nice schedule versus like said the time away from mykids one out, so i got into i got into that field for a short period of time,still working for you of m working as a unpursued nursing supervisor over seenseveral different visions of that, and it was a cool gig and it was somethinggi enjoyed doing, but i'm just not the...

...kind of girl to sit by in a desk. Doyou know i don't roll that way, so i'm very familiar with the ronald mcdonaldhouse over there. Just if you ever feeling sorry for yourself, you know tostop by there just see the the years i spent in the ice. The years i spentworking there, the things that i saw, the things that i experience things iwatch families go through. It changes your perspective andeverything every day of my life. Every minute, i'm awake, you think about that,there's not a day you don't and and all of a sudden, the things that you knowyou're stressed out about it, you're worried about or you think the sky isfalling, really aren't that big of a deal. So i know that you are very philanthropic, this kind of spark you're philanthropic,i guess you're your goals or your philothophy vein toget into that yeah. I think i think i've always kind of had a little bit inme to kind of always want to. You know, help others and do things and in smalland big scales, depending where the opportunities were right. Obviouslyhaving my business now creates a platform creates an opportunity for meto do more. Of that. You know i provide services that are very highly soughtafter can be very expensive, so kind of leveraging. That is a way to raise money and help help those thatneed. It is something that i've been fortunate enough to do. You know doing it back before that. Yes,absolutely, i think i've always even thing. I've always been that way. Thenursing component of that you know that just changes it does. It gives you moreempathy. It gives you a different understanding when you're in there andyou see families going through these things and you realize kind of how badit really can be. It just kind of puts perspective on things yeah forsure effects, arsty for life. So, as you know, so i had a special thesedaughter o care in an out of ieuse on a continual basis. I would spend manyweekends there, but it's hard to say i never felt sorryfor myself, but it was hard to when i would see families that don't ever get out of there or theynever take their kid home. And you know i'd have to go to work all day and thencome home in the evening, not to home, but to n. I see you and i do that onmonday, tuesday wenesday a week and then the wife go home, who's been there forfive days or senn sleep in a bed and then i'd sleep where there's no placeto sleep, and then i see you for a weekend. Basically and that's a toughlife, but for me it'd be spirit, but there's people there that do that allthe time and that stays with you, even though that's not a part of my lifeanymore yeah, and i think that any nurse you talk to no matter where theywork or what kind of nursing they do probably has a story. There's always, ithink i don't know a nurse that doesn't have something that drove them to become a nurse feel don'tusually come nurses because of the pay check, or you know, ragging rights orwhatever it may be. There's usually something some some personal experience.They had whether they were sick or someone they knew was sick or somethingthat they went through. That kind of brought them to that reality that thisis kind of what i want to do. You know for me. I always know any way to helppeople yeah, but in what capacity it nineteen twenty years old, i didn'tknow a right. I you know, i came out, came out of highschool and i had you know, probably like medicallyspeaking or personally speaking, kind of the two biggest experiences that iwent through. That probably was you know not probably it was definitelywhat made me decide that really. This is what i want to do with my life andhow i want to do it is i had when i was in high school. We discovered itscoliosis. So people don't know what that is, but basically he's my spanishcroke it's when you're in a grade school and they make you bend over andtouch your toes and so taee. I farly missed that day. Every day of my lifeuntil i was fifteen years old, so many people along that road drop drop. Theball, don't ask me how, but all of a sudden here i was at fifteen, almostsixteen years old in a doctor's office and they bend over and they're like whoyou know. I mean like i'm like a hunch back an onerantibus, i mean my rouba isso shifted. It just sits like this and we were all clueless and he's like hey.You got to get this girl in well, i was a major athlete. My whole world is is achild and as a teenager in high school involved in sports, i was a figureskater. I was a gymnast. I was a cheerleader, an splited track andswimming, and i mean you name it. If it was a sport, i was playing it and, andthat was my livelihood and it went from zero to hundreth because they missed it.So we went to children's hospital. We went to a lot of places, but we startedthere and it wit from like hey your back little crooked. Let's go get somex rays to the doctor coming in the room and saying this is so severe that we've passed anywindow of doing anything other than surgery, and it is an adult you processthat very differently than you do at fifteen. Sixteen years old right, youknow you too, you get l, you can. What a party of the world is over. So youknow you get, grounded and o it's...

...ending. You might as well just die, andso these at that age, all i could hear you know everything else was whitenoise was you're, never going to play sports again, you're, never going tocompete and skee figure skating again we're going to cut your spine down toyour spinal cord, we're going to wake you up in the middle of that surgery tomake sure you're not paralyzed. You might be paralyzed we're going to puttwelve it rods, o your spine, we're going to drill it together and you maynever walk again and there was a whole lot of more important things said, butthat was all that i heard right so that hit me hard. So i went from straight ay,student and and major athlete to i didn't want to get out of bed right. Idon't want to do anything. My my world was over, so i struggle a lot. Myjunior secca a junior year senior year, you know kind of pushed through, youknow suffered with some depression and issues, and it was just a complete flipflop. So ultimately, i waited until i graduated high school had the surgery.When i was nineteen, it was horrific. It became kind of my passion when iwork in the ic, because that's where children e supposed to surgery go as ican relate to that, but when i was in that hospital for that time and thatexcruciating pain there was these nurses there was, you know there wasgood and there was okay, but there was like extraordinary. There was thosepeople that just got it. They knew how bad it was and they knew that thoseteeny, tiny little things meant everything to me and to this daythere's you know a couple of those nurses that i will never forget, and and so there was that moment, andthen i come out of that, and i don't think it maybe was a year later.My grandma is six. My grandma is all timers and dimension. There was a lot of dynamics in myfamily at the time, but i was, i think i was nineteen, maybe twenty and- andthere was nobody in my family, stepping up to the play to take care of grandma.So that fell on me, so we ended up with nursing homes, and then i tried to takeover at home for a while. Then we got on a nursing home and they abused herand took it and didn't take care of her. So the that whole thing changed, and ifound myself at nineteen years old, trying to navigate probate court andexplain to them that i need to be her legal guardian at nineteen and there'sno family around is just me and and grandma has no money. So i'm not a kidin here trying to get some fadak there's nothing, there's some sweatpants in a locker and that's not it, and so so going through that processand taking care of my granma and watching people that were really. Imean, there's no race that there wasn't really horrible people that didn't takecare of her, and then there were some really great people that did- and ithink after going through both of those situations, my job in automotiveindustry became very unimportant to me very quickly. So it twenty years old ihad a full career. I was an account manager for automotive company at myown house. Most of my friends were still partying and i had a company carof my own house and a whole career, and i literally walked away from all of it.I sold my house, i quit my job. I worked in a bar and i went to nursing school and thatwas that uh well fails forward a little bit too. If youad, i'm glad you hedded the background of your scoliosis, because let's talk a little bit about yourdanjo warrior activity, nobody heard that you just said you hadscoliosis what you do surgery at oyo think we are going to do that on yeah,so, okay, so fast forward. Now to you knowso, so you basically made the career switch for the benefit of being withbeing a mom for chris witchen in from leaving likea pediatrics you to to timately office, and then from therei went into emergency medicine when i started injecting oh so that was kindof the you know, there's this kind of transition period during that, butabout the time that i started reviver en so i started injecting in twothousand and thirteen ages. I started becoming a seton conjectur at that time.Sort of specializing in it there's something being an injector doingcosmetic injectable, some of its medical base, two treatments, some ofits aesthetic, but it's very much an art as it is a science- and i say thisover and over again people hear me say this all the time: it's very much anart as it is a science. So i study facial anatomy instruction and we trainall the time in our industry. It's the kind of profession that changes andit's medicine right, and so so you go through this, and this is continued aslong since two thousand or teen. Since i started but very early on when i startedinjecting like baby baby baby, i realized that i was just really good atthis, like i just had an eye for it and i couldn't really explain it kind of like. I was the salomy of likea kid that can just play the piano and no one taught him right and you're likewell. How? How do you know to do that and he's like? I don't know. I just doright, there's something about facial taddy. There was something about theaesthetics of it that just clicked with me, and so i knew really at early onthat. I was good at it. I loved it. I enjoyed it and that was kind of whatdrove you know the the business in the in the early stages so fast for two thousand and seventeen,where you're getting an inja world.

We i decided to go, go out of my own startreviver and i started small first before we opened our expansion in twothousand and nineteen. At the same time, i i just gone through a divorce, sohere i am with a single mom and two kids, and i just quit my job andstarted in my own business, who the hell does that right, and you know itwas scary, but i think always in my life, i've always had a lot of guts anddrive and like here we go. I never it's got their little like mottos or thingsthat they kind of live by or think- and i always say this- some people ask meabout. It is no matter what, whether it's work or myfamily, or my friends or inja, or anything else that i've done in my life. My kind of criteria is what is theabsolute worst thing that can happen. Right was the absolute worst casescenario here. Can i live with that? If i live with that t, i'm doing it right,and so you know you play that out and i decide yeah worst case nero. I can livewith this right. I can always go back to my cu if things don't work outwhatever so i've often i do that so, but we're struggling right. You hadfamily, got dynamics or changed, and i got two young boys there's a lot goingon trying to start a business, and my boys are like you know. If this aninjuria american injuriam show and they're watching obsessively and i'mnot paying attention and they're like there's a gym and and howling to openit, we got to go and like that sounds kind of crazy, but kind of fun right.So, like you're going to do it out to do it, so we go and be check it out,and it was if you find, if you guys, have seen american joories right. Soyou know the drills exactly how it is on the show and we loved it and itstuck, and so we started going and they have a competition team. They said hewhat you guys are in our competition team and it rolled into two and a halfyears of the coolest time i ever sent with my kids the best shape i was everin in my life we traveled and competed. It was like being the hockey mom thatplayed hockey. You know you go to like these weekend and, like you know, ifriends that did it with me, one of the owners of jim sar and i became greatfriends and we, you know we'd go to canada for a weekend and we'd rollinout of friday, and you know the older, kids and the adults would compete onsaturday. And then you know you can drink the beer at night, because you'redinkered ing all the kids swim in the pool and then the little ones competedon sunday and you came back and i mean it kind of it. Kind of consumes run inthe best possible way. And meanwhile, everybody's, like you, are absolutelyinsane. Your spine is completely fused right. What are you doing like you,can't be swinging from bars and jumping off of buildings and like this isinsane? That's what drove you yeah and i waslike watch me right, i'm that girl. That's like tell me. I can't dosomething you want to give you to some tell me. I can't do it now, you'regoing to really watch me. Do it right and i d do fine different ways aroundit right. Sometimes i do things a little bit differently than somebodyelse, but that was the strongest. My back ever was, and it was a greatexperience, and so we did that, for we did that for a few years and it wasawesome. Well, you know it's. It goes for so many areas of your life.What ould be athletic, whether it be social, be hi, coco coco as a woke nap time is over, but itgoes for so many facets of your life. Stepping out of your comfort, one rightand doak chances and things and embracing change. Right change is good,but most people perceive it as bad because they're afraid her fraina use aus doing it. I'm not preaching anything, but i'm learning constantly learning.Thank you. What kind of a dream do you have on? I don't know, but i'm constantly learning and then infinance too. You know things are going to change and it's how you react to thechange and i just think that's a net such a great story about perseverancechange, taking risks. It's it's prettyinspiring, yeah you! You know, i were no different right. You story, i vstory kind of sit, we've all been through experiences, you know the difference may be dree meand someone else is. I have a big mouth and i talk about it right you made atfor the rest of us right. I have no shame in my game. So i'll tell you allthe dirty and the good. The gott tell all the things like the dumb things idid when i open my own business that i had to learn the hard way you know andget other moto pretty. I you know i couldn't time. I am the other injectorscome to me and say i want to start my own business right. You know you'redoing this you're on awesome job give me advice. I said i will save you. Thetime sit down with me and i will tell you everything i did wrong so that youdon't do it. Let's not reinvent the wheel here, but it's a learning curveright and but all of those things i mean you have a choice right. I hae achoice, you've back surgery, that's a choice and i going to roll over and belike. Oh my bather. I can't do anything. No, i'm going to find a way to do itright. You know. Am i going to be faced with challenges? Absolutely you knowsame with the business because it was scary. Was it risky to go out and dothat and take that leap of faith? Absolutely? But it's kind of back to that. You know.What's the worst case scenario right so who inspires you? Do you have any icons, motivations,personal or just people out there or you know any forms of i have. I mean, for instance, mygrandfather's not around any more, but...

...i still try to live a life where ithink he would be proud of, like i respected his life and i want to liveone similar, oh yeah, absolutely i mean we all have those people in our livesand- and i've been fortunate enough- that i've got. You know a lot offriends and a lot of supporters and i've surrounded myself a lot of reallygreat people that have taught me over the years and motivated me and pushedme and and challenged me and- and i think when you surround yourself,people like that that does help help you grow and mature and do those things.But i think for me: it's you know: i've got of old school like when i was alittle kid. You know most of what i got most of my drive. I think came from mydaddy. You know and my dad is still around and he's awesome, and but youknow when you're a young kid and you'regrowing up what you're told over and over nor getis what you believe right and so there's unfortunately circumstanceswhere kids are told. You know you can't do it you're incapable you're, notsmart enough, you're, not good enough you're ugly, or you know this or whatall of these things and these kids have no self esteem and no self confidence.And it's you know society, and you know all the things out there just make thisworse, that we didn't have when we were kids, but i grew up in this weird bubble:very normal bubble. Weird now, maybe some people, but to me it was verynormal. Where i just came from a very loving family. You know my mom told me:she loved me about a hundred times a day and it was annoying his hell, and itell my kids the same thing so probably a in same thing ackte in trouble, and i turn o. I t andbut you hear it over and over again right. You feel loved and my dad wasthe same way, but my dad was. It was an entrepreneur, my dad don't his ownbusiness, my uncle on his own business. I think it's kind. I was a like kind ofyour blood like you just some people just have that and some people don'tand i'm like. I think it was just always my blood. I always want my ownbusiness. You know before i had an injectable business. I own a securitycompany on a day care, a small businesses, but things that i didbefore they were kind of cool and fun, and but my dad was always like you canyou know you can do anything you want? If you were hard enough find a way,someone tells you, you know figure out how to do it. No one's going to takecare of you. You know, you're, a girl right old school go, find him in tomarry you an to you. No absolutely not you take care of yourself and you workhard. You do the right things doesn't matter if you're working at mcdonald orwhat you're doing you work a hundred percent, and so you kind of get somelike grip from that and you get some. You know some work ethic and i had ahell del kine out how many jobs did you have when you were a kid i may droplike a million, i work a million jobs and nobody made me have one of them. Iwould work two three jobs at one time, because why not right? Why not? What ami in don to play with my friends after work? I'm going to go, go, have a joband do these things, and so i had that kind of instilled in him and it filledin me from him all the time it wasn't like a passing conversation. It was anongoing conversation all the time. The time i was nineteen and i moved out,and they were both absolutely like. No, you were not going and it was soindependent and so stubborn and i have a lot of pride and so you know i wentoff on my own at nineteen and got my own apartment and i ate my raimondnoodles and i drink my coulait, and i ask my parents for a penny because dadtold me not to, and to this day i never have roman roman right in remit. I know iknow it's everybody, let's wrong, o it's gonna s, but i see raymond butroman really should raise their prices. Is a loft topic right, because what dothey cost? They're amazing? I don't know they're like free. They were likethirty three cents. When i was a kid and i don't know how i still know that,but i do right. Well, can you know their target market is orr and for people a scraping. So if they raise theprocess, but but the point of that story was, is that i ate my my raymondnoodles and drank my coulait and i never hadany debt and at nine years old i didn't have a credit card. I paid my bills, ilived with him. My means you'll go through times in your life, where youhave more and you have less right, but but my whole life, i've kind of lived,lived that way and just worked hard took care of myself found a way to getit done and and never never put myself in a situation right.It turn to others for help yeah. I respect that. You know i'm justlistening, i'm like drawing parallels from what you're saying what i'mhearing from clients all the time, because everyone is the story. I eevery background's different. Every current situation is different andthere's some tried and true truths: fundamental truths which is debtmanagement, saving more than you yea, spend or sit spending less than youearn and saving some for yourself and- and i just know it's a it's a hardlesson to learn. If you aren't taught it, i think no you're o. You know, ithink it's a really hard lesson to learn. It's very easy to want thatthing. That's in front of you, whether it's within your means or not.We live in a world of instant gratification, we want it, we want it,we want it so to have that self control to say i do want it and i'll get it oneday, but i'm going to have to keep working really really hard to get thereso question. How did you transition from a nurse toa what's the official title and aestheticinjector nurse injector cosmetic...

...injector as a lot of interchangableterms, but as a ingagane was that a normal pathway, no at a acater has tobe a nurse as i no not at all. So i o sad that one's leaving you or tablei'm taking it chill with me coco. So when i was young, i mean i'm a i'mold now you are young, come on, i'm not going to say all day, and i will i'mforty two. I don't care i'm forty two when i was probably twenty four twentyfive. I started getting botot because i went to my dermatologist and i was likeyou. Twenty four just really pathetic. I was like i feel, like i'm really oldin my face is ugly and you need to make me look pretty again, which isobnoxious, and you know you get the chemical peels and you get this, andbut one day looked at me. Eddie is the cosmic oronto y center of m, because itwas they had payroll deduction which is even worse. You know because you'relike oh, i just take it on my page- a go to see it eh and he's like you knowwhat, if they give you, let me put a little bottatot, because that was veryanimated right before i'm still animated about the four. I just doesn'tmove as much now and he's like. I think if we smoothed out those lines a littlebit and did a couple things you'd feel feel really good. So you know fifteenhundred dollars later i may have ye as a clan, and i'm like this is awesome,so i you know i can't afford to do this. All the time is at that age, but iwould go see him when i could and then i kind of started get intrigued by itand i'm like well. When are you going to give me a job? Why don't you hire me,teach me to do this. It's like yeah right, you're, never going to get inhere. It's never going to happen and will fan like being told. No, so that'snot going to rely with me right, so i won't. When i start doing my researchand i would say, i probably spent about six months doing research on theindustry. What is it is a growing? Is it viable? What does it take to do this?Is it safe? What's the investment into this and all these things- and iremember going to my family- and you know- they'll- probably be it set forme saying this, but it's just the truth and pretty much everybody told me i wasstupid. You know pretty much. That was the consensus and maybe not in thoseexact words, but they were like you just want to have a rankle freeforehead for free and that's a terrible idea. Why would you go start a eryou're not going to to go start a business and make a care out of ityou're a nurse right, but you know i d n. I don't like we told no so watch meright watch me so i went off in and it's not it's kind of a good old boysclub as an injector. It's not fair. You know a few years or ask for from now. Ilove nothing more than to have kind of like a little residency program to helpinjectors get into our industry and really help them build and have theskill set to do it and then help them find job placement, because there's abig gap between those two in our industry right now, but i kind of was going to go out anddo it on my own, i cross past with someone that had already established abusiness. We decided hey, let's not, let's not be each other's competition.Let's work together so i started. I started working there with somebodyelse. I got experience over the next, probably five years and then and then,as i mentioned before, decided to go out of my own and started revive arendand it kind of evolved from there into what i have now. So you mentioned partart, and you found you were good at it. So would that mean so you can train peoplewere to put the needles in the face, an anemen. So does the art come in in thatthey don't come out? Looking like john rivers, may i didn'tsay no, but you know we, it looks natural i mean. Is that the art of ityeah and it's a natural flow to what their face is like a good haircut for acertain face, not the same haircut for everybody kind of thing, exactly right,exactly no two faces are created echo. I have you know a million, i say tools,my tool backs whether it be products i use and injectable than i usetechniques that i use. I train all the time and how i'm going to treat you asgoing to be different than how i'm going to treat you, and there is thescience piece of that two is there's. You know we call the golden ratio orfive proportion, there's balance to our faces, that we want there's a stetimus.We use calipers to do this and to create that. But humans know what thatis, even with all the training be without the training that i have, youcan look at somebody, and you know, let's use an extreme example like avictory secret model right, you know or someone like some dude on the coverageq and you're like that is a very attractive human being. You don'tnecessarily know why, but you were like that is a very attractive human beingwell. We study yeah that violence, that science mint that so there's thatcomponent to it and then there's the train and skills behind i mean what ido people can confuse is like. Oh, it's a spy. You do facials, you do messages.This is a medical practice. This there's very serious complications thatcan come from what we do. The extensive training that i have, and those thatare really prevalent in my industry have is, is far beyond what you couldever imagine to make sure that what we're doing is safe and that we don'tinjure people right than people should always be very conscious of choosingtheir injector. Because of that, it's really interesting because for theuneducated mind in the area e, it's not it's, not justyour typical spot right now...

...i don't know what are the i guess mean services that you guys provide for yourclients in clientelle, just again the anas you get m now, absolutely so. Youknow it's kind of a unique dynamic, the the structure of the business modelthat i have it compared to others in my industry, so a medical spot, what people traditionally think of asyet you have an injector right. You do botot and fillers, and things like that,a lot of em on lasers, i think lasea awesome. I go to all my friends forthem. I just don't want to own them, and it's really medical clinicallybased, and so my business is almost kind of divided it into so. If you evercome by and i invite you to come by and check it out, yea the front end of mybusiness is what i can consider my medical spot. So we do iv vitamintherapy, which is a very popular service. You know, and that can be usedto treat anything from symptom management for clients of ours and ofcancer to a hangover to you know wellness. You know i peloton a regularbasis to keep. You know their writing as a neutres in their body and that proactive wellness and taken good care of themselves, there's obviously ourinjectable practice, which is what i do so that's the the boat tax of germaltors, all the anti aging we do it medically to so. Some people do it formy grains, grinding clenching, brokes m, there's a lot of other things for that.So that's the medical piece, that's where we have a medical director thatoverseas are practice, that's where the safety and all of that comes into playand all of my years of experience as a nurse comes into plac. You have a medical doctor that, like as anoverseer, yeah yeah, so he's not an injector, but he has to dr houses tooversee our practice. So every state is different rules and regulations andthat's ours in michigan, but then what i spun- and i did differently thanother places do is if you walk through my back doors, i have a traditional dayspot o you think about going on vacation with your wife and you're,going to go, get some couples massage or you know nice facial go in the sunand things like that. That's what we're creating there! So there's not a lot ofthat out in our area. There's! Just not! You know your on vacations places. Yes,you know you kind of go east side, you'll find it and in our town, there'sjust not a place where you really can go, and you know spend an afternoon andso we've a beautiful day spot where we provide all of these, these kind ofrelaxing and rejuvenating experiences and services. That's really that is unique again now.I feel, like i know, you're talking about, but i wouldn't know the firstthing about injections. No, i mean yeah, that's my job. You see a lot of guysgoing there. Well, it's e! U, i would trust my asking for a friend i do we do and with the most utmostconfidentiality i will. I will walk in you know, or small town right brains ofstrong community. We all sport, each other. I have more than a few times, walked into a store and seena client of mine and walked right past them like. I have no idea who they are,because i don't know who they're with yeah right. If i go to and i'm like hey,what's up bunch o, i want to lay your wife's going to be like who is she andwhy, and why do you know her? Why haven't you bought me in one of thosepat? I can trust right now. If my family listens, that i've been a clientof of errans, we look great, i ally ninety fo yeah. He is yes, he is so sothat's a structure of our business. I you know, i built my business arounda lot of trust with my clientele, so my business is primarily word of mouth.You know yeah, i social media. I have fun and instar. I goo around you. Wepost pictures of coco here in the studio and we do find things like that,but really at the end of the day, if i'm not going to recommend somethingto my clients and not going to offer something to make mine. Since i reallythink i can not get out of the park- and i do i'm good at what i do, and sothey trust me and i built a reputation around that, and so when i openedreviver, i in two thousand and seventeen and i've been at jack ganson.Two thousand and thirteen my business grew exponentially and very rapidly,and so i went from a small state to a medium space to i got to figure thisout and things happen pretty quick. So i open our full wellness center, whichis in green, o. Kamal green of village play small, it's beautiful, it's abeautiful facility. It was a fun project. I had no idea what i was doing.I've never built a home or anything, but i still have a literally the pieceof paper where i drew out and was like. I want the room here and here and thecool thing is: i would sit these architects and they're like she's, justa dumb girl she's like you, there's. Never that's never going to happen longago, and i like yeah, it is and i'm looking there, i've no other computersand let just move the little line over here and move that little line andthey're just like shaking their heads like. When is she going to go andfinally something clicked with them and they were like? Oh, maybe wait, yeah, maybe so so t the waythe building i got it. It built it from...

...scratch. So it's like a second home tome. I'm really proud of it is almost identical to a little pieces of paper.I first drew way back when the project started frame. Those hmm yeah, it'scool, it's cool. So when i first was sharing the idea of this podcast or you and your shop is really i'veused. Is the example which knows this is true. I use this as the example ofwhat this podcast should be about. I don't know if i use your bit name butrevival, r, n, it's a successful business and the person that owns it isa really authentic, genuine and caring person, and those are kind of peoplewant to talk out about or two and just find out what they're like what their story is.So i appreciate you doing that and i think when it first met you and then isaw subsequent times after that, your charitable nature, but it was a story of a sad story and you turn at i'm talkingabout so i'm to lead up to an tell a little bit about it. Butchas hassomething to share absolutely so you know i'm always looking for you know,opportunities to help, others when i kind of and i don't they just they comeabout. Sometimes right. These things fall into our plates and we were act,and so i left work. One day i was still the newspa was an opening. It was under construction, and so i was working outof a small space and building out the other one, and i leave work one day andi do a lot of instar m social medi and i have a face book account, but i'm notreal active in face book and i leave work and i open my phone and there'slike a begile messages at my face book and i'm like what's going on here andopen it up and i've kind of trying to sort through it. And someone had taggedme on like a group page in town, and it said they were looking for someone todo vitamin iv, vitamin therapy, which i do specifically vitamin c therapy for agirl that had cancer, and so i get home and kind of startin. These messages i'mtrying to start out. Meanwhile, a friend of mine text me and says: hey:do you do vitamin therapy of vitamin c? And i said yeah and she said well, myfriend's daughter is really sick and she's got cancer and she was gettingthe stream as forage. He can't find someone now and they really needsomething to do it. So i was like okay, give me your number, and so i meanliterally, is played out like thirty minutes, and i call her mom debbie andi'm like hey. You know i got got these messages, you know what can i do foryou guys find out she's just a few minutes down the road for me, she'sright in my town and you know, and her daughter's very, very young, newlymarried her husband kyle. Had this beautiful boy, leum little cute, reded,curlier kid, and i said, let me let me come over because as a nurse too, ineed to assess the situation. I didn't know medically. Is it safe for me to dothis right? General sense, i'm treating healthy people in my spouse and nowi've got to get my medical director involved doing assessment, but i've also had you know a friend ofmine that i lost from cancer, and i know how awful that can be and you justfeel like crap and you just want to feel good, and so i stop picked up afew things. We stop by and i have spending the whole evening with themand when i laugh, i just so compelled that i've got him something to helpthem. You know financially they're struggling she's sick. They got allthese things going on and and i'm kind of a ajerk or actually kind of girl.Most of what i do is not calculated at all and so a gin it a space and- andyou know how am i going to do this and it's scrambled around and it kind o wasinvolved a little bit, and so i called my friend that owns thespace, which is a yoga studio in town. I said: listen, i need to have an eventof scrawny to place to do it. Can i use your spice and she said absolutely youcan do whatever you want and then i m like okay. How can i make the mostamount money in the least of my time? We have no time here like we time is ofthe essence. What am i going to do, and so i made up no idea if it was going towork or not this like speed dating for bo tax, where i was going to do as muchbotocan. I could possibly do and a two hour window of time and i was going togive it all the way for free and it was all going to be donations for it forbecky and her family, and i had a tremendous amount of people that cameout of what works to support me, nurses and volunteered to help me make thishappen. I mean i had to be the e the person with the needle, but they tookcare of everything else, and then we did a ton of give aways free, fill orfree bo tax. For anything i could give away game, in wit, that might morerachetic it's more opportunities and- and it just created this frenzy and inabout it i don't know a couple days before, unfortunately, back he passedaway. So so we didn't make it to the event for her,but she left behind a young husband and a young child, and so you know,obviously we were going to move forward with the event and do that, and so, asa result of that, you know we raised. I think it was seventy five hundreddollars in about two hours to his family, which is amazing that theseknow our community is really strong out here, and people are really supportiveand very, very generous, and so we were able to do that for the family and istayed in touch with them and when kind of asked me to come out here, i said if there's something you want tobring out- and i said i love to kind of remember backy and talk about her alittle bit. Her mom is her mom's out of town right now, she's in alaska, so shesent something over for s us and i...

...think much as that i do- and this is anemail from her the mom in to read out louder, quick, prettyinspiring. Honestly, i just there's a consistent theme here. Aran you like toserve people. I feel like a whether it's your time is nurse and i think it's not right just a mi,whether your goals for the future, about trying to set up a consultative station for future a exact, ector's ejectors and then putthem on their own. I just it's it's pretty incredible. So this email we metaaron about a week before becky passed. We were looking for someone who couldcome out to the house and give her a vitamin c treatment. A friend of minegave me aaron's number and from that point on this amazing lady reached outto us in more ways than you can begin, the imagine. First she came over andmet becky and kyle, and when she came, she brought a little gift for becky bit.He was so excited to receive that. I think i recall there was a new pair ofpajamas so that she would feel good and a couple oils and hand, creams andstuff for her aaron stay for probably an hour and a half to two hours atnight. Just talking the day before becky died, we were at the hospital andi called there and asked her a question back. You did not want to come to ourhouse. She knew she was dying. I asked aaronwhat i should do because of all my heart. I wanted to come home. Aaronvery calmly talked me down off the railing. I was on and said you need todo what becky wants you to do. Aaron told me if you want to crawl in bedwith becky, with her hold her whatever you need to do. Do it whatever you need to do as a mama.Do it so becky went on that night to a hospital center with twenty four hoursand she was gone. Two days later, aaron came to our housewith gift cards packages saying that she had gotten from another friend forleam. We were blown away with a generosity the next year. On march twenty fourth,i lost my husband. We were married for four o three years and he died fromovid and just a week later, i tested a positive for covin and myself. I gaveaaron a call and she asked if she would she would mind, come giving kyle and ivitamin c shots. Of course, no hesitation. She was right there. Ibelieve that the vitamin c shots helped me fight covin. She continues to thisday to check it on me to see how i'm doing every now and then, and we only met weeks before becky died.This young lady is an amazing woman, so thankful, god brought her into my life. That is an incredible testimony. Yeah thanks, fuch erin is amazing. Your business isamazing, and i do only trust you with my face ofthat, and i appreciate you being here ye sure, and you know we can. Allpeople are hurting around us, whether it's the rain, falling that hard on people'slives or just a bummer day, and i think you know just every day if wetake a little bit of time just to look at others and that just ourselves, likeall the way back to the icy thing, no matter how bad like my situation was,there's people that had a way worse and i'll. Never forget them, no matter howbad our day is going is probably not as bad as her last couple of years has been, and soi'm appreciative of anyone who takes time to see those people and help them,whether it's with their business or just personally, we can all do it. Youknow a little bit. We all have our own issues to bear it in life and burdens,but it's always nice. If someone comes along and helps you with them, and iappreciate you helping people in the community, i appreciate that you guysare doing this and helping to kind of share these and and help others. Sothat's going to it's going to open that platform and open that door. To do that,i think it's great thank you and thanks for bring a cocoa m very fisty, but you know yeah give what you get get snuggles inlove with her. He was great hilarious. He's like a living stuffedanimal is so how do people find you? We are my web sites, reviver ncomi, myinstar ms a reviver, and face book poefied per located in green, notvillage, place mall over by buffalo wings, and it's over that side of towncan find us there. Coco is always there. If i am her como is there: how do theyfind her social media? Oh, we can find coin at l, cope, fluff, t green rightnow. I think it's up on the screen. Oh yeah, it's sort of the will they justcall on so appointment. Welcome. They can call our text us. So we're, likeyou know, with the new ages, people like to tax as much as we a want aphone conversation. People are busy, so we called her back phone at work. Thebat phones got a best semble on it and it's a a work folwed. So you can callour text us and we can schedule consultations or treatments. Myconsultations are always free. A lot of people are uneasier. Andsure about youknow: injectable, they don't know what...

...it is. They don't know what it cost.They don't know they do they're nervous. So i do really detailed and thoroughconsultations and i offer that service or free to help people put together aplan that they're comfortable with great all right. Great thanks. Savingthanks butch, thank you guy, i okay and we were going to close out by learninga little bit more about what which herzog does at executive wealthmanagement, hello, melburn, herzog, certified financial planner, privatewealth adviser here at executive wealth management. I actually started when iwas young. My father was the founder of exactly wealth management, knowing whati wanted to do allowed me to be a student of this industry from a veryyoung age. After working for two of the major wire houses, i had a few optionsof where i want to work. I chose to work at exactly wealth managementbecause i align myself with their build, defend in advance philosophies, there'sa certain value that you place on each and every relationship that's hard tofind elsewhere. You know, i believe everyone can use a financial advisor. Ibelieve that whether you're just getting started in your career oryou're just ending your career, i believe, there's decisions thateverybody comes across constantly that can have a major effect on your life inyour overall lifestyle. If a discipline approach and compassionate service ofsomething that you are interested in, i welcome the opportunity to meet withyou.

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