PurposeCity
PurposeCity

Episode · 6 months ago

05: The Revival RN Story

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Hear the amazing story of how against odds, Erin Jedrusik is living her best life and daily helping others do the same. Erin is the owner of Revival RN featuring cosmetic injectables, anti-aging, and wellness. Also, appearing is spa puppy Coco. 

PurposeCity is presented by Executive Wealth Management and exemplifies our core values of trust, community, and compassion. www.ewmadvisors.com 

Victim. Welcome to purpose city.Stories of humanity and action sponsored by executive wealth management. Yes, T onpurpose city do not necessarily refluct an endorsement of executive wealth management. Welcome thepurpose city. Today's topic is the revival our n story, and I havewith me Aaron Jed drew sick, you got it. That's right, yougot it, and which her Zog from executive wealth management, and we haveto interduce. You can introduce. Oh, who's on the table? Okay,Cocoa, which, if you don't know that, then you've been hidingin a hole. Yeah, so COCO. Yeah, so why would we knowthat? Coco? Obviously has a face of a celebrity. She doeshave the face of celebrity. Coco is our spot puppy at revival and she'sbeen she's two years old. It's been coming to work me every day sincethen and I'm pretty certain that most people come to my office to see cocoa. I'm also fairly certain that's the only reason you invite me here today.Yeah, so we'll get into it. But you do injectables. That's rightword. Right, Yep, that sounded out when I said it out loud. So injectables being face fill well, has my injectables boat people commonly knowBotox, dermal fillers, things like that. Okay, and have you done anyof those procedures on cocoa? Not yet. She's only two. She'sa little early in the game, but you know in what break you foryoung. She sheep to but she was the runt of the litter. Soshe's extraordinarily tying me at three pounds. So there'd be fourteen right when thecompanies is sure? Yeah, and I always try to, especially the beginning, just turn the conversation towards myself, of course. So this is myattempt. Is I actually contacted you and asked, how do I get adog like Coco at one time. Yes, and I almost did, but almost. But Cocos one in a million. However, there's probably about six othersout there, since people have met Copa Right right from the same parents. I literally tried to get a food dog like that. So I cameclose. I use the same I got the same breeder and I totally forgotthe breeds name that I had. I don't have the dog anymore, butthe dog is happy in another home because the dog had I didn't have time. It was a puppy and it did not have the mannerisms like this one. She's she's very special. This is cannot be replicated. Mine was Joey. If you remember then it was hey for the name. Well, Iwas asking about names my brise like, I think hank. What do youthink about Hank? And then I had joey. Yeah, I think Itried whalen. I even did hank three. Hank three, yeah, because there'sHank Williams Jr. No, no, they're Hank William and there's Hank WilliamsJr and then he has a son, Hank three, that does music.I thought Hank three just sound a little edgier than Hank. We wantto replicate cocoa. It just can't. I literally hit the Dog Jack Pat. Yeah, because one you but I can't walk around the dog like that. So I didn't name it something like a hank three. Even Joey wastoo cute. It's got to leave the dress off and your good. Yeah, I feel like you can't name a dog after human name. I justto me when I like frank or there's built, there's bill. I havesometimes I think it's cute Defense Coco's good name. Yeah, I get.We had a contest to name COCO. She was nameless for about a monthand a half. I couldn't come up with one and so I ran acontest. It worked at a big give way and then I had thousands ofnames and I had to decipher it down. So she was nameless for a while. Sometimes you sometimes it's both, though, like I named my sonMax and that was the number one dog name that year, almost every year, right, so you can't have a human. You didn't tell him that? Yeah, I did. I didn't name a because of that, butjust have. So which is with executive wealth management. What to do there? Good Morning. What do you do and what do they do? Well, good morning everybody. I am a private wealth advisor, which is kindof a fancy term for a financial advisor. Over executed wealth management. More orless we manage the financial life's and decisions for all of our clients.So we try to make their life simpler, try to beat that guide navigate anyfinancial decisions they might have and really, in the end we just build relationshipsand do it for the long term. And because you particularly are the cohosttoday, I have to ask you a brief history of the company?Good question. Yeah, so I've actually been familiar with the company ever sinceI was born and I was started by my father back in eighty one,and some say eighty five. So you're the fourth, I'm the fourth andhe's the third. He's a third and I've been around, or at leastI've been seeing him operate out of the...

...company, for that long. Soright, I've been kind of keeping tabs. So I came back a couple yearsago, back to town. I was in Chicago, and you havea dog. I have to kind of dog. One is a new one, Birdie, she's a shot. Kill me, a poodle and a BrittanySpaniel. Okay, so much energy, and the other one is a bordercollie and a Husky that I got in college for free and turn out tobe great dog. That's awesome. I Love Dogs. Cocoas tree, cocoa, calling down, cocoa. Yeah, Cocos. CBD treats can help calmyour your hyper one. So that I have in my notes. If yousee dogs with an Arrow to sebd, because I saw on your website.I do my research and I was like, well, not for my hyper one, for my one who gets cards ain't anxiety. Yeah, that's whathelp out a how absolutely, how okay, we'll take this off line because Iactually have dogs CBD. Well, if you play your cards right,I'm pretty sure my assistants showing up here at the end was that with sometreats. Are you guys so okay? You could take some home to yourbaby tonight? All right. So, yeah, tell us about that.So that's partially besides your dog being like your inhouse celebrity, your social mediacelebrity. She's now on product. Yeah, she is now on product. Sotreehouse CBD is a Michigan Owned Company. They manufacture full spectrum high quality CBD, which is used for a lot of reasons. I'm sure you guysat least are somewhat familiar with it. So can be anxiety, muscular pain, joint stiffness, for cocode helps her eat, gives our appetite. She'sa little bit of a you know, little nuggets. So it's always aproblem. A lot of benefits to it for humans and in animals as well. So we manufact our own line of CBD cream at revival or end wealso sell bath bombs. It just as kind of a popular thing. Peoplereally like them. You work really good. And so for a limited time theyare featuring cocoa on their CBD dog treats, which gave me a perfectopportunity to say, let's do something really fun and cool at this, whichis what I like to do. So the entire month we turned it intoa giant fundraiser for wagon tails, which is a local animal rescue. Soso we got a big event coming up with the entire month, anyone thatcomes in our spa buys or treats, we donate all the money the rescue, and you're not kind to get ways and fun things with it too.So we're writing coat tails of CO COO to help save the save some ofthe homeless puppies Nice. This is totally random, but every time I hearsee CDB, CBD, I think a CDB. Anybody in here know whatthat culture has to do with music? I'm even looking in the peanut gallerybehind. Isn't eve. It's music. You know, Charlie Daniels Band?Yeah, no, bringing myself back into it. Interviewing them once at hishouse outside Nashville and it is garage he had like this. S Chimaro orsomething and it had a big lightning bolt. CDB. Is that the devil wentdown the Georgia? Yeah, definitely, I got it. Yeah, Igot it. Yeah, I know songs, I don't know names.We're gonna put that on. Huge went down to Georgia. That be awesome. So, Huh, the dog moves, he look go, she is live. So what what else do you so revival are at. Yes,tell me how you went from a nurse, or even what led you to bea nurse, sure, and then to revival RN, to expanding toa wellness spot, that whole series of what motivate you? How does thathappen? And happens from, I think a lot of different facets. Right, so, before I was a nurse. Believe it, I've been a nursefor seventeen years. Okay, so I've been nursed for seventeen years.Be for in my previous life before I was a setic injector and specialize inthe industry. I'man now, I worked primarily at Matt Children's Hospital, atyou of M in pediatric intensive care. I know you're familiar. Yeah,right, yeah, that's could have crossed and didn't know. I think that. I think that at some point. They probably did, and so Ispent a tormenosent time there. My specialty was pediatrics trauma and you're seeing andI honestly, when I work there I was like, I will never leader, I love this job, I'm gonna do this till the day I die. It was both rewarding and heartbreaking. Right people didn't understand how I coulddo that. I'd have friends of family whers. I don't you know babiesare dying in every day. How do you go to work? How doyou do this? These are things people don't see in their entire lifetime.My perspective, what I love working with kids. I've always loved bring thekids. Everything I've done, not now, but everything I've done up until thispoint, is pretty much been revolved around working with children. In myperspective, on that was whether I'm here or not. These kids are sick. Kids are sick, they're dying, they have these things going on andI'm trained in capable of taking care of...

...them. And if it was mybaby in the ice you or my teenager in the pediatric I see you,I would want someone like me taking care of it. And it's not reallyabout me. Right. So through your nurse and pediatric I see use.HMM. So, for those that aren't familiar with that world, and weboth are, yes, from two different perspective, absolutely. So I knewof nurses in there and I'd got to know families in there. Is Iwas one of those families at one time him, and so people get aperspective of what life is out beside, outside of your own home, asthere's families in these icee us that nurses are helping that have kids that aregrowing up there of school age and all they've ever known is living in thathospital room, maybe even in a guarded bed like almost like in a bubblekind of situation, and anyone could there. He's probably ten years old. He'sat every birthday, they're every Christmas. Yeah, so that's been his family'slife for ten years. Yes, and had eight plus surgeries in that. That's his whole life. All he knows is living in a hospital inan I see you and a perfectly happy he's not. If you think ofa nice you kid that's just laying there and it's no, this is anormal, active kid that has one specific problem that just they can't quite fixit. They can't quite let him go. He has to recover from something minor. Well, it could be major, but it's a minor surgery. Butit just doesn't take and they redo it and they redo it and thePam family has this hope of maybe going home next month and they just neveryeah, coolest thing about kids. Kids don't feel sorry for themselves. Youthrow one of us in a hospital, but I god, I don't feelgood. I bolly my arm. Kids are like, I'm fine, I'mfine, because they want to play video games, they want to get thehell out of there, they want to go do something fun, right,and so they're just their cool kids. So, you know. So wesaved a ton of lives. Yeah, we lost a ton. It was, you know, a double edged sword said, I would say, thereforever. And then I two kids my own and and that change of things. Right, so I have now they're grown ISH, they're still babies tome. My youngest son is fourteen and my oldest son is sixteen and myworld revolves around these two, these two young men. So when I hadthem working holidays and weekends at midnight's probably for the next ten years, becausethere's not a big turnover in the ICU. It's such a specialty. You know, I chose my kids at some point in time and so I alwayssay I sold out. But what I be right in saying, and thisis totally a late person's guess, where having been on the family side ofit, that do you think did you get trained extra for putting an Ivy'sor do you think you become a more specialty than other nurses because special needskids are so difficult to find a vein to do it in a way thatdoesn't hurt them or scare them? I mean that takes maybe on the joblearned to skill. It's an acquired skill. It's something that that comes with time. It's the kind of skill that the more you do it, thebetter you get at it right and in different, you know, departments,different divisions, diferent dynamics, determines kind of how you do that. So, you know, when I worked an emergency medicine it was unfortunately, pinningdown a screaming toddler. Will someone's got his little leg lock so I canput an IV in his foot it. Yeah, yeah, I see.You know, the child might be sedated because they're so sick that their aneventilator. So different dynamics. They're right, and what you do is so seriousbecause now you have children's with problems going under and that causes as wholeother risk factor of, yeah, waking up properly and the problem. It'sa it's a lot, it's a lot, it's a lot. And there wasthis crossover when we work there. So some of these children go homeright and they still need care when they go home. So and many ofthem go home and ventilators there, you know, chronic lung conditions, premise, different things like that. So University of Michigan had a home care divisionwhere there's several different divisions, but one of them was, you know,pediatric home care, and so we would provide respite care the private duty nurscenein the home, and that was a service that you have provided. Soa lot of US nurses that worked in the ICU, that specialized in this, we already were taking care of these children. Some of them we hadknown for three months, six months longer than spent time with us them wouldgo home. So we would go and do it was kind of like alike a moonlighting job for us to go to their homes and take care ofthese children. So I kind of started doing a little bit of both andin eventually the department, the Home Care Division, offered me a position,is, a supervisor, for which I quickly said no multiple times and eventuallythey talked to me into it. And and the you know, the niceschedule versus, like said, the time away from my kids one out.So I got into I got into that field for for a short period oftimes. Still working for you, of I'm working as a new pursued nursingsupervisor. Overseen several different visions of that and it was a cool gig andit was something I enjoyed doing, but...

I'm just not the kind of girlto sit by in a desk. Yeah, you know, it's don't roll thatway. So I'm very familiar with the Ronald McDonald House over there.Just if you ever feeling sorry for yourself, you know, to stop by there. Oh Yeah, just just see the the years I spent and theI see the years I spent working there, the things that I saw, thethings that I experience, the things I watch families go through. Itchanged your perspective and everything. Every day of my life, every minute I'mawake, you think about that there's not a day you don't and all ofa sudden the things that you know you're stressed out about it you're worried aboutor you think this guy is falling, really aren't that big of a deal. So I know that you are very philanthropic. This kind of spark yourphilanthropic I guess you're your goals are your philothropic vain. To get into that? Yeah, I think. I think I've always kind of had a littlebit in me to kind of always want to, you know, help othersand do things and and in small and big scales, depending where the opportunitieswere right. Obviously, having my business now creates a platform, creates anopportunity for me to do more of that. You know, I provide services thatare very highly sought after can be very expensive. So kind of leveragingthat as a way to raise money and help help those that need it issomething that I've been fortunate enough to do, you know, doing it back beforethat. Yes, absolutely, I think I've always. I haven't thinkI've always been that way. The nursing component of that, you know,that just changes. It does it gives you more empathy, it gives youa different understanding when you're in there and you see families going through these thingsand you realize kind of how bad it really can be. It just kindof puts perspective on things. Yeah, for sure. Effectually our stree ofyour life. So, as you know, so I had especially these daughter fullcare in and out of I see use on a continual basis. Iwould spend many weekends there, but it's hard to say I never felt sorryfor myself, but it was hard to when I would see families that don'tever get out of there or they never take their kid home. And youknow, I'd have to go to work all day and then come home inthe evening, not to home but to an I see you, and Ido that on Monday Tuesday, when was you all week, and then ledwife go home, who's been there for high days. I can sleep ina bed and then I'd sleep where there's no place to sleep and then Isee you for a weekend basically, and that's a tough life, but forme it bes spurts. Yeah, but there's people there that do that allthe time and that stays with you, even though that's not a part ofmy life anymore. Yeah, and I think that any nurse you talk to, no matter where they work or what kind of nursing they do, probablyhas a story. There's always, I think, I don't know a nursethat doesn't have something that drove them to become a nurse. Build on.Usually come nurses because of the paycheck or, you know, bragging rights or whateverit may be. There's usually something, some some personal experience they had,whether they were sick or someone they knew was sick, or something thatthey went through that kind of brought them to that reality that this is kindof what I want to do. You know, for me, I alwaysknow anyway and help people. Yeah, but in what capacity? At Nineteen, twenty years old, I didn't know. Yeah, right, I you know, I came out a came out of high school and I had,you know, probably like medically speaking or personally speaking, kind of the twobiggest experiences that I went through. The probably was, you know, notprobably, it was definitely what made me decide that really, this is whatI want to do with my life and how I want to do it.Is I had when I was in high school. I did we discovered atscoleosis. So people know what that is, but basically means my spine was crooked. Yeah, it's when you're in great school and they make you bendover and touch your tones and so much. except I apparently missed that day everyday of my life until I was fifteen years old. So many peoplealong that road drop, drop the ball. Don't ask me how, but allof a sudden here I was at fifteen, almost sixteen years old,in a doctor's office and they bend over and they're like Whoa, you know, I mean like I'm like the hunchback and our dame if I bend over. I mean my rib cage is so shifted it just it's like this.We were all clueless and he's like hey, you got to get this girl in. While I was a major athlete. My whole world is it is achild and is a teenager in high school involved around sports. I wasa figure skater, I was a gymnast, I was a cheerleader and middles buyto track and swimming and I mean you name it, if it wasa sport, I was playing it and and that was my livelihood. Andit went from zero to a hundred because they missed it. So we wentto children's hospital. We went through a lot of places, but we startedthere and it went from like hey, your backs little crooked, let's goget some xeries, to the doctor coming in the room and saying this isso severe that we've passed any window of doing anything other than surgery. Andit is an adult. You process that very differently than you do at fifteen, sixteen years old, right. You know, you took your get toldyou can't go to party, of the world is over. So you know, you get grounded and it's ending.

You might as well just die.And so these at that age, all I could hear. You know,everything else is white noise. was you're never going to play sports again,you're never going to compete and skip figure skating again. We're going to cutyour spine down, your spinal board. We're going to wake you up inthe middle of that surgery to make sure you're not paralyzed. You might beparalyzed. We're going to put twelve inch rods your spine, we're going todrill it together and you may never walk again. And there was a wholelot of more important things said, but that was all that I heard,right, so that hit me hard. So I went from straight a studentand in major athlete too. I didn't want to get at a bed rightI didn't want to do anything. My my world was over. So Istruggled a lot my junior, second of junior senior year, you know kindof push through, you know, suffered with some depression and issues and itwas just a complete flip flop. So ultimately it waited until I graduated highschool. Had the surgery when I was nineteen. It was horrific. Itbecame kind of my passion when I work in the ICU, because that's wherechildren have slowly surgery go. I could relate to that. But when Iwas in that hospital for that time and that excruciating pain, there was thesenurses, there was, you know, there was good and there was okay, but there was like extraordinary. There was those people that just got it. They knew how bad it was and they knew that. Those teeny tinylittle things meant everything to me into this day. There's, you know,couple those nurses that I will never forget. And and so there was that momentand then I come out of that and I don't think it maybe wasa year later. My grandma was six and my grandma's Alzheimer's in Duncha.There's a lot of dynamics in my family at the time, but I wasI think I was nineteen, maybe twenty, and and there was nobody in myfamily stepping up to the plate to take care of grandma. So thatfell on me. So we ended up with nursing homes and then I triedto take over at home for a while and we got our nursing home.Then they abused her and took it didn't take care of her. So thenthat whole thing change and I found myself, at nineteen years old, trying tonavigate probate court and explain to them that I need to be her legalguardian at nineteen and there's no family around, is just me and and grandma hasno money. So I'm not a kid in here trying to get somepaycheck. There's nothing. There's some sweatpants at a laccer and that's about it. And so so going through that process and taking here my grandma and watchingpeople that were really I mean there's no other rays. They there's a reallyhorrible people that didn't take care of her and then there were some really greatpeople that did, and I think after going through both of those situations,my job in automotive industry became very unimportant to me very quickly. So ittwenty years old. I had a full career. I was an account managerfor Automotive Company at my own house, most of my friends were still partyingand I had a company car, my own house and a whole career andI literally walked away from all of it right I sold my house, Iquit my job, I worked at a bar and I went to nursing school. That was that. Huh Wow, fails forward a little bit too,if you add. I'm glad you had at the background of your Scoliosa story, because let's talk a little bit about your nn Joe Warrior activity. Ifeverybody heard that you just said you had scoliosis. saw what you do surgeryspot about. Think we are going to dodge that one. Yeah, so, okay. So fast forward now to you know. So. So youbasically made the career switch for the benefit of being with being a mom,for a curse which from leaving like a pediatric yes, I see you,to to acurately office and then from there I went into emergency medicine. WhenI started injecting. Okay, so that was kind of the you know,there's this kind of transition period during that. But about the time that I startedrevival aren so I started injecting in two thousand and thirteen days, Istarted becoming a Seidic conjector at that time, sort of specializing in it. There'ssomething being an injector doing cosmetic injectible, some of its medical base to treatments, some of its esthetic. But it's very much an art as itis a science, and I say this over and over gain people hear mesay this all the time. It's very much an art as it is ascience. So I study facial anatomy, instructural and we train all the timein our industry. It's the kind of profession that changes and it's medicine,right. And so so you go through this and this is continued as longsince two thousand and thirteen, since I started. But very early on whenI started injecting, like baby, baby, baby, I realized that I wasjust really good at this, like I just had an eye for it. I couldn't really explain it, kind of like I was these an alogyof like a kid that can just play the piano and no one taughthamn rightand you're like, well, how do you know to do that? Andhe's like, I don't know, I just do right. There's something aboutfacial natomy. There was something about the esthetics of it that just clicked withme, and so I knew really on early on that I was good atit. I loved it, I enjoyed it and that was kind of whatdrove you know, the business in the in the early stages so fast fortwo thousand and seventeen, where you're getting a Ninja World M we I decidedto go go out on my own start...

...revival and I started small first,before we open our expansion in two thousand and nineteen. At the same timeI had just gone through a divorce. So here I am with a singlemom and two kids and I just quit my job and started in my ownbusiness. Who The hell does that right? And and you know, it wasscary, but I think always in my life I've always had a lotof guts and drive and like here we go. I you never it's gottheir little like mottos or things that they kind of live by or think andI always say this. Some people ask me about it is. No matterwhat, whether it's work or my family or my friends or Ninja or anythingelse that I've done in my life. My kind of criteria is, whatis the absolute worst thing that can happen? Right, where's the absolute worstcase scenariohere? Can I live with that? If I can live with that,I'm doing it right. And so, you know, you play that outnight a side. Yeah, worstcase scenario. I'm I can live withthis, right. I can always go back to my Seu if things don'twork out whatever. So I go off and I do that. So,but we're struggling, right. You have a family, got dynamics are changeand I got two young boys. There's a lot going on and try andstart a business and my boys are like, you know, if this Ninja Warrior, American injin warrior mom show, and they're watching obsessively and I'm notpaying attention and they're like there's a gym and been how will and it openit, we gotta go, and I'm like that sounds kind of crazy butkind of fun, right. So like you're gonna do it, on todo it. So we go and we check it out and it was.If you'd know, you guys have seen American and Je Worrier Snisuo, right, so you know the drills exactly how it is on the show and weloved it and it stuck and so we started going and they have a competitionteam. They said, he you want, you guys are in your competition teamand it rolled into two and a half years of the coolest time Iever spent with my kids, the best shape I was ever in in mylife. We traveled and competed. It was like being the hockey mom thatplayed hockey. You know, you go to like these weekend and, likeyou know, I'd friends that did it with me. One of the ownersof Jim Sarah and I became great friends and we'd you know, we'd goto Canada for a weekend and we'd rolling on a Friday and, you know, the older kids and the adults would compete on Saturday and then you coulddrink the beer at night because you're done competing with the kids, swam inthe pool and then the little ones competed on Sunday and you came back,and I mean it kind of it kind of consumers run in the best possibleway and meanwhile everybody's like, you're absolutely insane. Your spine is completely fused. Right, what are you doing? Like you can't be swinging from barsand jumping off a buildings and like this is insane. That's what drove you. Yeah, and and I was like watch me right, I'm that girlthat's like, tell me I can't do something. You want to give medo something. Tell me I can't do it. Now you're going to reallywatch me do it right. And I had to find different ways around it. Right, sometimes I had to do things a little bit differently than somebodyelse, but that was the strongest my back ever was and it was agreat experience. And and so we did that for we did that for afew years and it was awesome. Well, you know, it's it goes forso many areas of your life, whether be athletic, whether it besocial, behind Coco, COCOCO has a woke up, naptime is over.But it goes for so many facets of your life, stepping out of yourcomfort zone, hmm, right, and take my chances and always and embracingchange. Right, change is good, but most people perceive it as badbecause they're afraid. You're afraid of that used to. What use doing it? I'm not preaching right, think, but I I'm learning, constantly learning. Thank you. What kind of cream do you have on? I don'tknow, but I'm constantly learning. And then in finance too, you knowthings are going to change and it's how you react to the change, andI just think it's a next, such a great story about perseverance, change, taking risks. It's pretty inspiring. Yeah, you you know. Iwere no different, right, you have a story. I have story,kind of sort. We've all been through experiences. You know the difference madebetween me and someone else's. I have a big mouth and I talked aboutit. Right, you may not, for the rest of us, right, I have no shame in my game. So I'll tell you all the dirtyand the good. They got to tell you all the things, likethe dumb things I did when I open my own business that I had learnedthe hard way, you know, and we want to hear about those prettyI think. You know I couldn't tell me. Then the other injectors cometo me and say I want to start my own business. Right, youknow you're doing this. You're doing an awesome job. Give me advice,I said, I will save you the time. Sit Down with me andI will tell you everything I did wrong so that you don't do it.Let's not reinvent the wheel here. But it's a learning curve, right.And but all of those things, I mean, you a choice, right, I've a choice. You've back surgery. That's a choice. Am I goingto roll over and be like, Oh, my back's heart, Ican't do you think now I'm to find a way to do it right,you know. Am I going to be faced with challenges? Absolutely, youknow. Same with the business. Is it was scary. WAS AT riskyto go out and do that and take that leap of faith? Absolutely,but it's kind of back to that. You know, what's the worst casescenario? Right? So who inspires you? You have a any icons motivations,personal or just people out there or, you know, any forms of Ihave made? For instance, my grandfather's not around anymore, but Istill try to live a life where I...

...think he would be proud of like, I respected his life and I want to live one similar. Oh yeah, absolutely. I mean we all have those people in our lives and andI've been fortunate enough that I've got you know a lot of friends and alot of supporters and I've surrounded myself a lot of really great people that havetaught me over the years and motivated me and pushed me and and challenged meand and I think when you surround yourself people like that, that does helphelp you grow and mature and do those things. But I think for meit's you know, I'm kind of old school, like when I was alittle kid, you know, most of what I got, most of mydrive, I think, came from my Daddy. You know, if mydad is still around, and he's awesome and but you know, when you'rea young kid and you're growing up, what you're told over and over overguy, is what you believe right. And so there's unfortunately, circumstances wherekids are told, you know, you can't do it, you're incapable,you're not smart enough, you're not good enough, you're ugly or you knowthis or what, all of these things, and these kids have no self esteemand no selfconfidence and it's, you know, society and you know allthe things out there just make this worset that we didn't have when we werekids. But I grew up in this weird bubble, very normal bubble.Weird now maybe to some people, but to me it was very normal where. I just came from a very loving family. You know, my momtold me she loved me about a hundred times a day and it was annoyingas hell. And I tell my kids the same thing. Say probably okay, the same the same thing good about it that saying I love you backor they are in trouble and I will turn their light on and but youhear it over and over again. Right, you feel loved and and my dadwas the same way. But my dad was it was an entrepreneur.My Dad own his own business. My uncle and his own business. Ithink it's kind of I would say it's likes kind of your blood, likeyou just some people just have that, some people don't. I'm like,I think it was just always my blood. I always want my own business.You know, before I had an injectable business. I own a securitycompany, out to day care, small businesses, but things that I didbefore, they were kind of cool and fun and but my dad was alwayslike you can, you know, you can do anything you want if youwork hard enough, find a way. Someone tells you know, figure outhow to do it. No one's going to take care of you. Youknow, you're a girl right old school. I'll find someone to marry you intonow. Absolutely not. You take care of yourself right and you workhard to do the right things. Doesn't matter if you're working a McDonald's orwhat you're doing. You work a hundred percent, and so you kind ofget some like grip from that and you get some, you know, somework ethic. And I had a he'll tell you now. How many jobsdid you have when you were a kid? How many job? Like a million. I worked a million jobs and nobody made me have one of them. I would work two, three jobs at one time because why not?Right, why not? What am I do? I will play with myfriends after work. I'm going to go, go, have a job and dothese things. And so I had that kind of instilled in him andinstilled in me from him all the time. It wasn't like a passing conversation,it wasn't on going conversation all the time. So the time I wasnineteen and I moved out and they were both absolutely like, you know,you're not going, and it was so independent and so stubborn and I havea lot of pride and so you know, I went off on my own atnineteen and got my own apartment and I ate my Raymon noodles and Idrink my coolaid and I asked my parents for a penny because dad told menot to. And to this day and never have Raymon Romin right, Raman, I know, I know, it's everybody leves Raman. Oh, it'sgetting get the stuff, but I say, Raymond, what Roman really should raisetheir prices. It's a little off topic, right, because what dothey cost? Are Amazing. I don't know. They're like free. Theywere like thirty three cents when I was a kid and I don't know howI still know that, but I do. Right. Well, can you know? Their target market is poorer and poor people scraping, and so ifthey raise the prices. But but the point of that story was is thatI ate my my Raymond noodles and drink my coolaid and I never had anydebt and at nineteen years old they did have a credit card. It paidmy bills. I live with him my means and Y'all go through times inyour life where you have more and you have less, right, but butmy whole life. I've kind of lived lived that way and just worked hard, took care of myself, found a way to get it done and never, never put myself in a situation where to turn to others for help.Yeah, I respect that. You know, I'm just listening. I'm like drawingparallels from what you're saying what I'm hearing from clients all the time,because everyone is a story, right, everyone, every backgrounds different, everycurrent situations different, and there's some tried and true truth. So fundamental truth, which is that management saving more than you you spend, or to spendingless than you earn and saving some for yourself and and just it's a it'sa hard lesson to learn if you aren't taught it, I think. No, you're right, you know, I think it's a really hard lesson tolearn. It's very easy to want that thing that's in front of you,whether it's within your means or not. We live in a world of instantgratification. We want it, we want it, we want it. Soto have that self control to say I do want it and I'll get itone day, but I'm gonna have to keep working really, really hard toget there so question. How did you transition from a nurse to a what'sthe the official title right now? Esthetic...

...injector, nurse injector, cosmetic injectors? A lot of interchangeable terms, but asthetic injector. Is that a normalpathway? No, not at all. Okay, that's not a pretty wreck. You have to be a nurse. Do I know? Not at all. So I sad that runs leaving you. You came out a table. I'mtaking little chill with me, cocoa. So when I was young, Imean I'm a I'm old. Now you are young. Come on,I'm not going to say all dam I will. I'm forty two. Idon't care, I'm for you too. When I was probably twousd four hundredand twenty five, I started getting botox because I went to my dermatologists andI was like, you know, twenty four is really pathetic. I waslike, I feel like I'm really old in my face is ugly and youneed to make me look pretty again, which is obnoxious. And you know, you get the chemical appeals and you get this and but one day lookedat me and he's is the cosmetic dermatology center. You of them because itwas. They had payroll deduction, which is even worse, you know,because you're like, oh, I just take it out of my page,I better to see it, and he's like, you know what, Ithink if you let me put a little botaxing her, because that was veryanimated right before. I'm still animated about the four I just doesn't move asmuch now. And he's like, I think if we see that those linesa little bit and did a couple of things, you'd feel feel really good. So, you know, fifteen hundreds later, I'm happy as a clamand I'm like this is awesome. So I you know, I can't affordto do this all the time, as at that age I would go seehim when I could, and then I kind of start of get intrigued byit and I'm like, well, when are you going to give me ajob? Why don't you hire me teach me how to do this? It'slike Ye, all right, you're never going to get in here. It'snever gonna happen and will bound like being told no. So that's not goingto fly with me right. So I w home and I start doing myresearch and I would say I probably spent about six months doing research on theindustry. What is it? Is it growing? Is it viable? Whatdoes it take to do this? Is it's safe? What's the investment intothis and all these things, and I remember going to my family and youknow, the probably be upset for me you saying this, but it's justthe truth. And and pretty much everybody told me I was stupid. Youknow, pretty much that was the consensus, and maybe not in those exact words, but they were like, you just want to have a wrinkle freeforehead for free, and that's a terrible idea. Why would you go start? You're not going to go start a business and make a care out ofit? You're a nurse, right, but you know, I don't.I don't like we told No. So watch me right, watch me.So I went off and it's not it's kind of a good old boys clubas an injector and it's not fair. You know, a few years fastforward from now, I love nothing more than to have kind of like alittle residency program to help injectors get into our industry and really help them buildand have the skill set to do it and then help them find job placement, because there's a big gap between those two in our industry right now.But I kind of I was going to go out and do it on myown. I cross paths with someone that had already established a business. Wedecided, hey, let's not let's not be each other's competition, let's worktogether. So I started started working there with somebody else. I got experienceover the next probably five years and then and then, as I mentioned before, decided to go out on my own and started revival run and it kindof evolved from there into what I have now. So you mentioned part artand you found you were good at it. So with that mean so you cantrain people where to put the needles in the face an anemy. Sodoes the art come in and that they don't come out looking like Joan rivers? Right, I didn't say names, but you know where it looks natural, I mean, is at the art of it. Yeah, I meanit's a natural flow to what their face is like. A good haircut fora certain face, not the same haircut for everybody, kind of thing.Exactly right, exactly. No two faces are created equal. I have,you know, a million, I say, tools in my toolbox, whether itbe products I use and injectables that I use tech tchniques that I use, I train all the time and how I'm going to treat you as goingto be different than how I'm going to treat you. And there is thescience piece of that too. Is there's, you know, we called the goldenratio or five proportions. There's balance to our faces that we want.There's a stetus and measurements and we use calibers to do this and to createthat. But humans know what that is. Even with all the training and withoutthe training that I have, you can look at somebody and you know, let's use an extreme example, like a victory secret model, right,you know, where someone like some dude on the coverage Eq and you're likethat is a very attractive human being. You don't necessarily know why, butyou were like that is a very attractive human being. Well, we study, yeah, that biounce in that science find that. So there's that componentto it. And then there's the training and skills behind. I mean whatI do people can confuse is like, oh, it's a spa, youdo facials, you do massages, this is a medical practice. There is. There is very serious complications that can come from what we do. Theextensive training that I have and those that are really prevalent in my industry haveis is far beyond what you could ever imagine, to make sure that whatwe're doing is safe and that we don't injure people. Right, I'm apeople should always be very conscious of choosing their injector because of that. It'sreally interesting because for the uneducated mind in this area, it's not it's notjust your typical spa. Right now,...

I know what are the I guessmean services that you guys bide for your clients and Clientel just again for energy. You can know absolutely. So you know it's it's kind of a uniquedynamic, the the structure of the business model that I have it compared toothers in my industry. Yeah, so a medical spa what people traditionally thinkof as Yep, you have an injector, right, you do botox and fillersand things like that. A lot of my own lasers. I thinklasers awesome. I go to all my friends for them. I just don'twant to own them, and it's really medical clinically based, and so mybusiness is almost kind of divided. It it too. So if you evercome by and invite you to come by and check it out. Yeah,the front end of my business is what I kind of consider my medical spot. So we do IV vitamin therapy, which is a very popular service,you know, and that can be used to treat anything from symptom management forclients of ours that of cancer, to hangover to, you know, wellness. You know, if people come in a regular basis to keep, youknow, their vitamins and nutrients in their body and and that proactive wellness andtaking good care of themselves. There's obviously our injectable practice, which is whatI do. So that's the Botaxi, Germal flowers, all the and toaging. We do it medically to so some people do it from my grainsgrinding, clenching, Brooksism, there's a lot of other things for that.So that's the medical piece. That's where we have a medical director the overseasour practice. That's where the safety and and all of that comes into playand all of my years of experience as a nurse comes into play. Soyou have a medical doctor that like as an overseer. Yeah, yeah,so he's not an injector, but he has to Doctor House, has tooversee our practice. So every state is different rules and regulations and that's oursin Michigan. But then what I spun and I did differently than other placesdo, is, if you walk through my back doors, I have atraditional day SPA. So you think about going on vacation with your wife,you're going to go get some couples massage or, you know, Nice Fatcial, going the sauna, things like that. That's what we're creating there. Sothere's not a lot of that out in our area. There's just not. You know, you're on vacations places. Yes, you know, you kindof go east that you'll find it, and in our town there's just nota place where you really can go and, you know, spend anafternoon. And so we have a beautiful day SPA where we provide all ofthese these kind of relaxing and rejuvenating experiences and services. Okay, that's reallythat is unique. Again, now I feel like I know you're talking aboutbut I wouldn't know the first thing about injection. No, I mean,yeah, that's my God. Do you see a lot of guys going there? Well, it's she's the only one I would trust my face. Askingfor a friend. I do. We do, and with the most utmostconfidentiality. I will. I will walk in. You know, small townright brands of strong community. We all support each other. I have morethan a few times walked into a store and seen a client of mine andwalked rice past them like I have no idea who they are because I don'tknow who they're with. Yeah, right, if I go up to you andI'm like Hey, what's up, butch and I want to play,your wife's going to be like who is she and why? And why doyou know her? Why haven't you bought me one of those parts. Ican test right now, if my family listens, that I've been a clientof errands. We look great. Well, I'm actually ninety four. Yeah,he is. Yes, yes, so that's a structure of our business. I you know, I built my business around a lot of trust withmy clientele. So my business is primarily word of mouth. You know.Yeah, I social media, I have fun and Instagram, I goof around. You know, we post pictures a Cogo here in the studio and wedo fun things like that. But really, at the end of the day,if I'm not going to recommend something to my clients and not going tooffer something my client, since I really think I can knock get out ofthe park, and I do. I'm good at what I do, andso they trust me and I built a reputation around that. And so whenI open revival and in two thousand and seventeen, and I'd been in joctingsince two thousand and thirteen, my business grew exponentially and very rapidly, andso I went from a small stays to a medium space to I got tofigure this out and things happen pretty quick. So I opened our full wellness center, which is in Green Oak Mall Green, a village place, small, it's beautiful. It's a beautiful facility. It was a fun project. Ihad no idea what I was doing. I've never built a home or anythingthat. I still have a literally the piece of paper where I drewout and was like I want the room here and here. And the coolthing is I would sit these architects and they're like she's just a domb garage'isn't doing you. There's never that's never going to happen, though, andI like yeah, it is, and I'm looking there. I've no eithercomputers and like just move a little line over here is move that little lineand they're just like shaking their heads, like when is she going to go? And finally something clicked with them and they're like Oh, maybe, wait, yeah, maybe so. So the way the building I got it itbuilt it from scratch. It's like a...

...second home to me. I'm reallyproud of it. is almost identical to a little piece of paper I firstdrew way back when the project started. Frame those HMM, yeah, it'scool. It's cool. So when I first sharing the idea of this podcastor you and your shop, is really I've used as the example, whichknows this is true. I've used this as an example of what this podcastshould be about. I don't know if I use you by name, butrevival our and it's a successful business and the person that owns it as areally authentic, genuine and caring person, and those are kind of people wantto talk about or two and just find out what they're like, what theirstory is. So I appreciate you doing that and I think when it firstmet you and then I saw subsequent times after that, your charitable nature,but it was a story of I say that story in your turn. I'mtalking about. So I'm going to lead up to it. Can Tell alittle bit about it, which has the has something to share. Absolutely.So, you know, I I'm always looking for, you know, Opportunity. Used to help others when I kind of and I don't. They justthey come about sometimes right these things fall into our plates and we were actand so I left work when day I was still the new spot wasn't open. It was under construction, and so I was working out of a smallspace and building out the other one. And I leave work one day andI do a lot of Instagram, social media and I have a facebook accountbut I'm not real active on facebook. And I leave work and I openmy phone and there's like a bajillion messages and my facebook and I'm like,what's going I'm here and open it up and I'm kind of trying to startthrough it and someone had tagged me on like a group page in town andit said they were looking for someone to do Vitamin Ivy, vitamin therapy,which I do, specifically vitamin C therapy for a girl that had cancer.And so I get home, I'm kind of starting these messages, I'm tryingto start out. Meanwhile a friend of mine text me and says, Hey, do you do vitamin therapy of vitamin C, and I said yeah,and she said, well, my friend's daughter is really sick and she's gotcancer and she was getting the Stream with forne. Can't find someone now andthey really need someone to do it. So I was like, okay,give me your number. And so, I mean literally is played out likethirty minutes, and I call her mom, debby, and I'm like Hey,you know, I got got these messages. You know, what canI do for you? Guys? Find out she's just a few minutes downthe road for me. She's right in my town and you know, andher daughter's very, very young, newly married her husband Kyle. They havethis beautiful boy, Liam, little cute reded curlier kid, and I saidlet me, let me come over because as a nurse to I need toassess the situation. I didn't know medically is it's safe for me to dothis right general sense, I'm treating healthy people in my spots and now I'vegot to get my medical director involved do an assessment. But I've also had, you know, a friend of mine that I lost from cancer and Iknow how awful that could be and you just feel like crap and you justwant to feel good. And so I stop picked up a few things,we stop by and I'm spending the whole evening with them and when I laughed, I just so compelled that I've got into something to help them. Youknow, financially they're struggling, she's sick, they got all these things going onand and I'm kind of a knee jerk reaction Kuyd a girl. Mostof what I do is not calculated at all. And so and I didn'tspace and you know, how am I going to do this? And itscrambled around. I think Ken was involved a little bit, and so Icalled my friend that owns the space, which is a yoga studio in town. I said, listen, I need to have an event for the scrull. I need a place to do it. Kind I use your spice, andshe said absolutely, you could do whatever you want. And then I'mlike, okay, how can I make the most amount of money in theleast amount of time? We have no time here, like we times ofthe essence. What am I going to do? And so I made upno idea. If it was going to work or had this like speed datingfor Botox, where I was going to do as much botox as I couldpossibly do and a two hour window of time and I was going to giveit all away for free and it was all going to be donations for Beckyand her family. And I had a tremendous amount of people that came outthe wood works to support me. Nurses, the volunteered to help me make thishappen. I mean I had to be the NERD, the person withthe needle, but they took care of everything else. And then we dida ton of giveaways. Free Fill, a free botox or at anything Icould give away. gave a way. That meant more raffle tickets, moreopportunities and it just created this frenzy and in about it, I don't know, a couple days before, unfortunately, back you passed away. So sowe didn't make it to the event for her, but she left behind ayoung husband and a young child, and so you know, obviously we weregoing to move forward with the event and do that, and so as aresult of that, you know, we raised I think it was seventy fivehundred dollars in about two hours was family, which is amazing that these you know, our community is really strong out here and people are really supportive andvery, very generous, and so we were able to do that for thefamily and I've stayed in touch with them and when kind of asked me tocome out here, you know if there's somebody you want to bring out andI said love to kind of remember backy and talk about her a little bit. Her mom is her mom's out of town right now. She's in Alaska. So she sent something over for us and I think which has that Ido, and this is an email from...

...her, the mom. I'm goingto read out loud or quick pretty inspiring. Honestly. It just there's a consistenttheme here. Aaron like to serve people. I feel like whether it'syour time is nurse and the think's not right, they might whether your goalsfor the future about trying to set up a consultative station for future inductor exactactors, objectors and then put them on their own. I just it's it'spretty incredible. So this email. We met Aaron about a week before beckypassed. We were looking for someone who could come out to the house andgive her a vitam of C treatment. A friend of mine gave me Aaron'snumber and from that point on this amazing lady reached out to us in moreways than you can begin the imagine. First she came over and met Beckyand Kyle and when she came she brought a little gift for Becky. Beckywas so excited to receive that. I think I recall there was a newpair of pajamas so that she would feel good and a couple oils and handcreams and stuff for her. Aaron stay for probably an hour and a halfto two hours at night just talking. The day before Becky died we wereat the hospital and I called Aaron to ask her a question. Becky didnot want to come to our house. She knew she was dying. Iasked Aaron what I should do because of all my heart I want her tocome home. Aaron very calmly talk me down off the railing I was onand said you need to do what becky wants you to do. Aaron toldme if you want to crawl bed with Becky, with her holder, whateveryou need to do, do it. Whatever you need to do as aMama, do it. So becky want on that night to a hospice centerwith twenty four hours and she was gone. Two days later Aaron came to ourhouse with gift cards packages, saying that she had gotten from another friendfor Liam. We were blown away with a generosity. The next year,on March twenty fourth, I lost my husband. We were married for fortythree years and he died from covid. Then, just a week later,I tested posit for Covid and myself. I gave Aaron a call and sheasked if she would she would mind come giving Kyle and I vitamin sea shots. Of course, no hesitation. She was right there. I believe thatthe vitamin C shots helped me fight covid. She continues to this day to checkin on me to see how I'm doing every now and then, andwe only met weeks before becky died. This young lady is an amazing woman, so thankful God brought her into my life. That is an incredible testimony. Yeah, thanks much, Aaron. Is Amazing. Your Business is amazingand I'd only trust you with my face that and I appreciate you being here. Yeah, and me sure, and you know we can all people arehurting around us, whether it's the rain falling that hard on people's lives orjust a bummer day. And I think you know, just every day ifwe take a little bit of time just to look at others and that justourselves, like all the way back to the icee you thing, no matterhow bad like my situation was, there's people that had a way worse andI'll never forget them. No matter how bad our day is going, it'sprobably not as bad as her last couple of years has been, and soI'm appreciative of anyone who takes time to see those people and help them,whether it's with their business or just personally. We can all do it, youknow, a little bit. We all have our own issues to bearin life and burdens, but it's always nice if someone comes along and helpsyou with them, and I appreciate you helping people and the community. Iappreciate you guys are doing this and helping to kind of share these and andhelp others. So I think that's gonna going to open that platform and openthat door to do that. I think it's great. Thank you and thanksfor being a cocoa hmmm, very feisty but you know, yeah, giveit, you get, you get snuggles in love with her. If it'sgreat, it's hilarious. He's like a living stuffed animal. It is.So how do people find you? We are my website's revival andcom my instagramsat revival, UN facebook. How do they find core, located in greenup village, play small over by Buffalo Wings? Anyone's over that side oftown can find us there. Coco is always there if I am their composthere. How do they find her on social media? All we can findcoke on at like COCO fluff screen. Right now, I think it's upon the screen. Oh yeah, it's so did the will? They justcall and set appointment, walk in. They can call our text us.So we're like, you know, with the new ages, people like totax as much as we want a phone conversation. People are busy. Sowe called our bat phone at work to that phone has got bat symbol onit and it's a work phones. So you can call our text us andwe can schedule consultations or treatments. My consultations are always free. A lotof people are uneasier and sure about, you know, injectables. They don'tknow what it is, they don't know...

...what a cost, they don't reallydo. They're nervous. So I do really detailed the thorough consultations and Ioffer that service. Are Free to help people put together a plan that they'recomfortable with. Great, all right, great, thanks, Aaron. Thanks, but thank you, guys. Thanks. Okay, and we are going toclose out by learning a little bit more about what which her Zog doesat executive wealth management. Hello, Albert Herzog, certified financial planner, privatewealth advisor here at executive wealth management. I actually started when I was young. My father was the founder of exact wealth management, knowing what I wantedto do, allowing me be a student of this industry from a very youngage. After working for two of the major wirehouses, I had a fewoptions of where I want to work. I chose to work at exactly wealthmanagement because I align myself with their build, defend and advanced philosophies. There's acertain value that you place on each and every relationship that's hard to findoutse where you know. I believe everyone can use a financial advisor. Ibelieve that whether you're just getting started in your career or you're just ending yourcareer. I believe there's decisions that everybody comes across constantly that can have amajor effect on your life, in your overall lifestyle. If a discipline approachand compassionate service, it's something that you are interested in. I welcome theopportunity to meet with you.

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