PurposeCity
PurposeCity

Episode · 4 months ago

06: 'The Big Boy Story’

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Hear the history of the Big Boy brand and how it became a part of the Elias Brothers! Chris Elias, former President and Vice Chairman of the board of Big Boy, is now President of Elias Associates, Principle of Nexecute, and Radio host of Transformative Experts on Voice America Talk Radio. 

PurposeCity is presented by Executive Wealth Management and exemplifies our core values of trust, community, and compassion. 

Guest Chris Elias Principal and CEO, Nexecute Former CEO, Big Boy Restaurants www.nexecute.com  

Host Ken McMullen Executive Wealth Management 

Welcome to purpose stories of humanityin action sponsored by executive wealth management, yes to purpose city, do notnecessarily reflect an endorsement of executive wealth management, all rightwelcome to another purpose city. If nothing else, that is awesome, thememusic. I think we're going to have a fan base of people just kind of rockingout and an ses. I hear my boys they tuned me out, but there's some today wehave a friend and a pretty important person in life, we're going to hearabout his life chris eli elo, chris hi ken. How are you mam good? How are yougood you're, the first one we haven't had in studio but you're in your ownstudio, because every cast studio in their house but yeah yeah, who had ever thought that we just hadlike generally a large percent of the population,basically has their own radio studio and their home just it's normal. It is normal and it's amazing how easyjust to get the equipment. What you need to do. Of course, you know i run aradio show as well, so so i had to go to something a littlebit better, but hey it works, it's all good. It does work. It is all good. Sowelcome to this one. I've been on your radio show yeah, welcome. Welcome to this, not a radioshow, but it's a pretty cool podcast, and so this one's entitled the story of bigboy. So chrysalis is currently the founder and principle of execute whichwe'll talk about, but when you guys have a principle like i'd,expect, co or president. Does that mean like you, have hallway rules or no? It's just you know we played aroundwith it and the terms like ceo and president, all that stuff it justdidn't really fit. We didn't want managing partner. I mean you know, youknow. Principles are in any kind of like firm or you know, people who kindof create the organization they're like the key members, and it opens us up.You know we can have other principles over time. Other people come in. Youknow my ego doesn't have to be wrapped around a title. Like president or ceo,or anything like that, we just keep it kind of simple, butquite frankly, people call me all kinds of things and just whatever is fine,well the people that call you chris elias, you have to kind of. We have to thowstory when you're, when you have a name like alias right, so people don't know.Chris is attached to the famous elias brothers and if i got my stats rightfor my online homework here that, even though it's been many years as a that, it's been a life brother's beenassociated with big boy. Restaurants mainly midwest, grew national. I thinkit's back to elia midwest thing, but still it's got like seventy fivepercent brand recognition. Nationally the same, i think at one time the big boy character. I remember inone brand study where they looked at it. They looked at the top ten mostrecognizable like brand logos and characters, and we were in that top tengroup, and that was with like mickey mouse and, and there were a bunch ofothers. You know ronald mc donald, obviously, and some some of the others.But when you looked at e we were, we were in the top ten. I wouldn't be abit surprised. You know, i mean it's been a lot of years and things havechanged with big boy that it's not quite there like it used to be. Unfortunately, you know so we sold thecompany two thousand and somewhere along the way. I saw an article thatsaid, we were at one point: the big boy character was in one of those lists ofone of the top brands, that's due to disappear, and that was, i think, justyou know. After the sale there were some things that that didn't go wellfor the company that bought it. I won't get into decisions, but therewas a there was a mass shrinkage in the size of the organization, the numberrestaurants nationally, and so i think that that you know those of us who'vebeen around for a while recognize the character. It's amazing, how often i'llhear somebody say. Oh yeah, we used to have one of those in our town and whathappened or or you know, yeah. I remember thatcharacter. Oh you know. I had my first date there i mean i hear stories likethat all the time, but you know younger younger people- people, since you knowborn since two thousand may not have the recognition to the big boycharacter, even though there's a little bit of a cult following happening nowas well. I've noticed some merchandise. There are different things and you knowyou can find the big boy character out there like on e bay and other placeswhere people are buying older stuff. I mean so there's kind of this secondarykind of push on it right, yeah. You know my kids, seventeen and he knows itmainly because it's still my parents only place they want to have breakfastyeah. So there's that so you were or the sonof was it frank, alias it was fretille right lie, i'm sorry. So there is fredlewis and...

...john. They were the three brothers. Sowhen you heard the termillion rs it was, it was those three. They also had threesisters- my my aunts, mary helen and aunt, dan and and i was interested to read that theywere so as a six kids right. Their parents brought them over from whattheir lebanese immigrants so so my grandparents, their parents, came over. Let's say i came over on theboat in the late eighteen, hundreds early, nineteen hundreds in that range,my father, whos, the oldest of the kids, was born in boston. They had come overto boston, we already had other family in boston, but my father was born insand. Nineteen, thirteen so a hundred and eight years ago, and so so yeahlebanese immigrants coming over. At the time when immigrants were coming to theunited states came in through boston and that's that's where the familyoriginally settled. So, what's kind of the brief history of how they came over, there were children. Immigrants with you knowcourse their parents and how does three of them end up being a part of what wasone of the largest really restaurant franchises known demand at one time? Isthat fair to say? Well, so you know highly driven so again, dad born in thousand nine hundred andthirteen in boston. My uncle louie was born in nineteen sixteen in boston. Myuncle john was nineteen nineteen in boston. They were each three yearsapart. They ultimately moved to detroit a little bit later for work, but askids they were in you know. As often immigrants do you know, their parentssettled in an area of boston at the time was one of the let's call tougherparts of town, and you know moving into the greatdepression and the depression era, the family had little to know money.Everybody had to work. Everything was was really special. I mean you know. Ifyou just think about this. They used to tell a story once about how precious anickel was to him one day. Their dad gave him a treat and gave him nickel,so three of them could go to a movie and they dropped that nickel in thesnow. So somebody stayed right at that spot. While somebody went got somematches, so they could melt the snow and get the nickel think about this. Ifyou drop a nickle and snow today, you wouldn't even think twice about it,probably right, but that that's how precious things were and when you growup in that level of adversity. You do everything you can to make some money.My dad bought o w boxed for a while. He was a boxer in the golden gloves.Amateur ran kings and made some money that way, but then over time needed to get somework and because there was so little work in boston, they relocated to thedetroit area, where we had some other family at the time, and there was acompany called the eagle baking company. This is back, then i don't know ifeagle still exists in some former is changed, but that was a that was somecousins and my dad's first real job as soon as he could drive was driving adelivery truck, and so he started making money for the family just bydriving a delivery truck and and utilized funds from that to supportthe family, and actually, you know, start paying for my uncle louie to goto college. My dad never went to college, but my uncle, who was thefirst in the family, to go to college and and start getting. You know somelevel of a you know an advanced education that went on for a little while andultimately he pulled enough money and my uncle. We came back from school andthey decided to open up a you know restaurant. So so i give you a kind ofthe error where now you know we're, post oppression were mid n s and theyopened up their first little. It was a hamburger stand and it was a laugh. Itwas it was. It was eight stool. So if you could imagine, i don't know ifyou've ever been in, like a really really old white castle or if you'refrom the detroit are. If you've ever been a hunter house or any of thosekind of things that that would give you the idea of what it was was evensmaller, yet basically a counter eight stools and they cooked behind thecounter, and that wasn't an uncommon set up for that era. Pre world war twoand they started they started with justjust a burger place and it was called fred's chili bull i mean they had achili recipe and- and just you know, hot dogs, hamburgers, a few items ontheir menu, and that's kind of that. That's where things launched tell you afunny side story. My uncle used to tell the story of their first majorexpansion. They added two seats to the counternice. They were able to wrap it around. Add two seats the counter, so theyalways described that as the beginning of the great expansion of of the thewhat became alias brothers at that time to go a little further in history that restaurant that operation evolvedand the next next thing that occurred was drive in restaurants were juststarting to kind of come into play, and so they converted this story to a drivein and they it was. It was on dixie...

...highway, and so it was called the dixiedriving and they ultimately expanded a five dixie drive in locations, and sothat was their first kind of multi store expansion and around about thatsame time. My my uncle john was good friends witha guy named bob wyan bob started, glendale california and he had a place,was bob's pantry and it was home of the big boy and there's probably a wholeanother story behind behind that. That's really interesting, but bob hadhad created really the big boy concept at that moment in time and they were toconference and they were having dinner with bob and bob was was was saying hethat somebody had kind of taken his concept and stolen it god by the nameof dave, frish in ohio and legally. He couldn't do anything about it, becauseunless you back in those days unless you're a multi state operation, you hadno franchise protections, o franchise laws didn't even exist again were onethousand nine hundred and thirty eight. I think at this point, thirty six orthirty, eight somewhere in that range and my dad and uncle said well, whydon't we become a franchise of yours in michigan, you'll get multi state andthen nobody else can do this to you. In the meantime, they got to know davefrish. He came into the fold and they they purchased a franchise for thestate of michigan and back at that time, for one dollar a year in perpetuity tobe the big boy franchises in in michigan fast forward. Another you know, let'scall it twenty five years or so mid s bob had gotten up there in age anddecided that he wanted to retire. He ended up selling the concept to marryatcorporation mariett took it over. They licensed the country, they utilized aregional licensing system as opposed to a franchise system, which is why youknow. Sometimes you know if you went into what was like a bob's big way. Youknow it would be different than if you went into a live brothers. It would bedifferent that if you went into a frishes t, j's marks shones at the timewas part of the system. Every operation had its own things. What they werereally doing is licensing the character of the big boy sandwich and a few otheritems, but then they led each operator operate regionally, and that was maybefine back in th s, though you didn't have the same. National footprint thatyou would have had you been a homogeneous franchise, but but it did allow for some growth atallowed. Marat some grows now, as we got into late s, there started beingsome infighting between groups. Some were performing better than others,some wanted to expand out of their territories and couldn't because ofrestrictions. The first territory battle occurred between fresh andshones and shene's got that so upset that they walked away from theircontract and went independent and they were fighting over. You know who couldput restaurants. I think it was in the state of kentucky and frish own. Thestate first didn't have much operation there, but they hated chones and theyhate each other. So all this in fighting started becoming problematicand mariette decided to sell the company and around bins. When we re atput it up for sale, they gave us the the option to buy it. They actuallygave us and for the option by christian want it. We did. We took it over whenwe took it when we bought it. We kind of said to everybody: okay, we're goingto drop all the names elias brothers. You know frishes all those names andwe're just going to go. Big boy go national, but because of our contracts,they all had the option to stay in or get out. They all decided to get out, except for frish one of the originals.They stayed in and all the rest of them got out and i think all the rest wereout of business within a couple years. After losing the name recognition. Youknow they weren't good operators. It was probably a good thing for us at thetime. You know to kind of change. I mean you know it just it was better all theway round, and then we started building the big boy brand from there. So that'skind of the short version of the history of big boy itself and how itcame into the fold and how it became part of a lives. Brothers, yeah,interesting. One of the things i thought is a sidenote that was interesting as well as when you're in their early days, whenthey decided to come to detroit detroit was known as the paris of the midwest. It's it yeah. I probably because youknow deto, you know i was it was. It was right, one french, founded city andyour role. There was: what did you do big? How long were you there? Oh gosh? Ah i want to see my whole life right. I handled almost like almost everythingat one point or another, it just you know growing up in a family business iwas, i was still sucking. Literation did you create the little color the little coloring books? No, no, this o my biggest memories of bigboys. Can we go to big boys because they had to crisolora yeah yeah, so youknow funny funny story there. So that was actually the guy who was thecreator behind? It was a guy, my name of manfred bernard and little sidestory. Manford's sister was ruth bernard, which is she was a very, veryfamous photographer back in the days when y you hailed, people like anseladams and alfred stigliano, some of...

...these great photographers, and so youknow, certainly a very artistic family manford was a good friend of the familyand it was his company that did it, but that that's that dated back a littlebit before my time, not much as comic who have been there. If youhave one of the original big boy comics, it's worth a lot of money right now. Ihope you here's a funny side story back in, i would say it was probablythe late h s marvel approached us to buy by the concept and running bab boygoing a super hero. One of the avengers big boy could have been a superhero. Imean we really thought about it, but here's. The crazy part is, i rememberat that point in time, and i was really new to working in the company full time.Stanley himself was out there i'll, never forget that, but but back thennobody knew who stanley was. Stanley became obviously much more popular whenthe movies really hit in the the late n s early and what would big boy be as anadventure avenger? Let's just try to figure that out. He'd have the same outfit right, whichis the guy right behind you he's got the overalls yeah. I probably have tohave. You know some type of an electric bachelor or something like that, butyou could port the the enemies with yeah yeah. They went wrong with thatbad decision yeah, but it s funny because a lot of people because of myhair would say: oh did they get this swoop from you now. It's so so side story, the here's,here's another funny side story. Nobody knows the original original, big boy,restaurant bob's, pantry right that did i referred to in glendale, was right bythe disney studios and there was a kid walk working behind the counter one dayand a lot of the disney artists would come and have lunch and one of them just did a sketch. We'velost the name of the guy, the whole shot. No, nobody knows who it was. Oneof them did a sketch of the kid working behind the counter and at became theoriginal big boy character, interesting yeah. So so there's a disney. There wasa disney artist out there somewhere a cartoonist that created the original big boy logo which actually evolvedover the years. Yeah i mean, hopefully he created something else and loadedhis pockets because he missed out on that one huh. Well, you know you'retalking again when, like night s era, i mean things were different. It thenyeah. I still can't get out of my head big boys, an adventure. You know hestill has a chance with dc comic. I bet you fit right in with. Is it thejustice league? I think it's o the h. So would the cape be checkered, or isthat just a little too much to have overalls and cape checkered? Maybe youneed to have you know so, i'm looking over to my right here. I actually havea statue here in my office and you know: there's a turquoise color. That trimsis maybe it would have have had to have been like a turques cape. I don't seehim as a flyer. Now yeah probably mess up his hair, wouldn't it so that's the big boy, history yeah! Soat its peak how many restaurants would you say there were in your heyday andthen your family hasn't owned it in years? Where do you think and they'rebaingletop like a midwest thing right so they're rat yeah? So i can't claimto know any of the statistics. Now i mean i'll. Tell you what i what i'veheard? Okay. So, first of all, in its hey day, i think we were as much asfifteen hundred restaurants world world wide. There was a real big growth up.We had a japanese franchise e who had committed to grow to almost fivehundred restaurants. They were they were going to. They were growing a fivehundred when i left the company was a real major thing that we had done. Theydone something incredible, but i heard after after we left after we sold thecompany that they went away. So i don't know really what happened there. The last i heard, and so the theinvestment group that bought it bought it from us, you know, had had a we had gone througha turn around in the nine o o t s. We had made a bad acquisition so that hurtthe company a little bit, but when we saw the company was back kind ofgetting into stable growth mode and then the new owners, you know they hadtheir problems. You know i can't claim to what they were, but i had heard atone point that it got down as low as thirty five restaurants. Now, sincethen, another group has bought it. I think they're best, as i can tellthey're doing some good stuff with it they're retooling the brand they're kind of there they're kind oftaking it back to some grass roots, which i think is important. You know, i certainly don't know whathappened with the recipes. We used to manufacture a lot of our own. You know our own signature items andall that was one of the things that set us apart, but they seem to be doingsome good stuff and i think they're growing again, but i couldn't tell youhow many there are i've seen a few pop up recently in the area. So that tellsme some good things are happening sure so up the present day, you've been involved and are the leaderand founder of execute and did that stem from well, i guess everythingstems from your past right. You learn and grow, but ere thing specificallylike your work with companies finding their core values, a helping, theleadership and guiding. So your core...

...values become part of your culture andnot just a plaque on the wall, because that stem from those days, oh yeah, whoyou win into or lessons learn it's funny. How often i'll hear a story fromsomebody i bumped into that either worked with us or worked for us back inthose days or people that we interact with and they'll say all the time. Ohgosh, those were the good old days. Your company was amazing. The culturewas absolutely incredible and look nothing's perfect right and you alwaysremember the good stuff when you look back, but but i remember that we hadsome tenets. You know that that used to get drilled into our head, and i meanthere are people today that will laugh when they hear me say this, but youknow my uncle. We always said hot food, hot and cold food, cold right and thatwas kind of his quality thing and we talked about the importance of familyand if you looked at the makeup or of our organization the number of familiesthat worked for us, whether they were franchises or within the corporateoffices, i mean we had. You know: lots of husband and wife teams, multiplegeneration teams, a great example, tony michael's, who became the ceo. You knowyou know after i left the organization. His father worked for us for many manyyears. A d and tony came to work for us right out of college and work. For us imean so we had a lot of multi generations. So family was super superimportant. You know clean environments and all that they were just realsticklers about that, and- and you know back in those days, those would havebeen our core values. You know, if we had, we had worked those out. Thosedefinitely would have been our core values. Maybe we would have put somenames, but the concept of core values and companies and basis of culturedidn't come on until you know after those days, you know really thoseconcepts started creeping up about ten or fifteen years ago. I think one ofthe early references comes from jim collins and good to great, which waswritten in two thousand and one, but companies before that had value systemsand they drove them and and great cultures were the ones that stickedwith those stuck with those values. We just didn't use that terminology, butthat was definitely a learning that came forward. I also i learned someinteresting stuff when i was working in our manufacturing group. You know my my. What i would describe is one of my mymentors in life, my god, my name o ralph, ralph jarmet. I hope i can namenames. Rout ralph's not with us anymore, but ralph, was a phenomenal, phenomenalperson and you know he taught me a lot of stuff.He taught me so much about the importance of engaging other people. Hetaught me about having the right people, you know in the team- and you knowpeople write about this today- right people on the bus, wrong people off thebus, that you know colin said that and there's a lot of stuff that comes up.But you know i'm ten, fifteen years before that- and i was learning fromralph that that no leader is successful without a great group of people andit's and it's really best, let the people shine. You know you have to beopen to continuous improvement and you have to know what's most important atany given time, and so those were the learnings that when i left big boy, wewere really stuck in my head and i had the opportunity to guy named vern,harness who'd written both mastering the rocket feller habits and joined upwith a group of guys here that we're building a system on that same stuff-and it was just like it was like i was- i was literally connecting with peoplewho were reading out of the same book. Right i mean it was it was, it wasphenomenal, and that was probably it was the beginning of my career as anadviser, and we use the word advisor, not consultant, because i thinkconsultant has a different connotation and we act with our clients more likeadvisors than we do consultants. So, but you know the the thing i learnedmore than anything is great. Culture is essential, and great culture alsorequires good process. So everything we've built it since then is designingaround building a great culture and having a great process that insurersexecution and the basis of all that is core value. So you mentioned corevalues a minute ago. That's the basis core values. Alignmentis the basis of culture and any organization. So when you go into acompany, they hire you to consulting and you're. Looking for the core values,do you find at times that they actually don't havecore values, or do everybody have court values or they're, just hoping thatthey can get a high end, coconut adviser, like you tosay, you're, not in hiring consultant? They don't get quite the work we do,but they hey. That's. You know yeah well, okay, so they hire you are theywanting you to basically say come out with like a list of this iswho we are, and it's all positive and it just looks good for pr purposes andfor their employees. Do you ever find that that you go in there really isn'ta good culture to work with, and then what do you? What do you do and- andour second question is, what do you typically find- are their core values?Are they similar or companies, really different yeah? So you know, in orderto answer that question, i got to take a little bit of a step back. So, first and foremost, every company has aculture right, whether it's good or bad is left to interpretation. Rightso, oneperson might look at a company, say:...

...they've got a great culture and anotherperson might look at that same company say it's a it's a lousy culture rightso so perspective is very, very important. What i often have to say isthe difference be between a good culture and a bad culture is intention,meaning when leadership or ownership don'tfocus on the culture they want. Then they get whatever culture arises. I got one of my friends always said youknow the culture you get is the culture you tolerate, and so, when i talk aboutthe difference in good and bad intentional culture is when leadershipsays, we know what culture we want in the organization and we're going to doeverything we can to support, enhance and ensure that culture exists andwe're just not going to let anybody disrupt that that this is who we'regoing to be, because not everybody's a good fit for every culture right right and they're, neither goodor bad it's just about fit so in defining the culture. The first step isto then identify your core values and believe it or not. Core values alwaysexist within organization. We say you don't create them. You really discoverthem. We have a whole process for how you discover the core values that areliving and breathing, but when you haven't gone through that what can showup or what we call accidental values, which can sometimes be anti values tothe organization? I can chare kind of all kinds ofstories on that as well. So you know when we go in, you know, usually we'rebeing hired. You know, there's lots of reasons whywe get hired, but probably most of the time, if i were to distill it down, leadership, isn't happy at the level atwhich you know companies are, their company is executing right, you know,or maybe the culture isn't quite right or they've been stuck or these kind ofthings, and i would say about half the time we start. The company already hasan established, set a corps values and about two thirds to three quartersof those. The core values aren't right, because you know they didn'tnecessarily use the right process to get to the core values the absolute wrong way to do it, in myopinion, is to just sit around and pick words that you like, because those justend up being words on a wall and unless you're willing to you know, hire peoplewith those values and fire people. If they don't have those core values, theybecome hypocritical and then nobody takes it seriously. You know at the endof the day when, when you've got the right core values, it means that youwant to find people who are aligned to those core values and that alignmenthas nothing to do by the way, with any kind of demographic diversity oranything like that. You can have a fully diverse work force with similarcore values. Right i mean you know. Let's can we just talk aboutyour company's core values for a minute sure loud yeah? So what are your corevalues? So it's a trust, compassion, community, okay, so let's, let's go ttrust, compassionate community for a minute and i'll just make theassumption that those are the right core values. You're going to charge mefor this yeah that'll come a little bit later. Ano so you'll see how that gets to one of my core values right. So i do thisstuff all the time. So you know the point is: is trust, compassion,community anybody can have those core values, but not everybody will havethose. Not not. Everyone will have those core values. Does that make sense.So when i'm hiring people i want to find out, do people have those valuesis part of their operating system, because the more i do that the morelikely more likely it'll be that they'll get along with other peoplewithin the organization. So the reason why this becomes really important is weknow from all the research. That's been done that successful relationships are based on on core value alignmentbetween the people in that relationship. I can sure i have done so much researchand studying on this. I can show you how any failed relationship can betaken back to a core value level into a misalignment of the hoar values of thetwo people in that relationship, personal or professional. Let's a repyou for a second a right there, so to take it out of a business concept for asecond and go to a relation el. What kind of core values and would yoube talking about so i mean? Are you getting down to just i guess at theendy right, you're talking the interpersonal, so i could be familyfriends spouses. So how could someone take? This was a significant other, not that they would hire you for this.I guess, but how do they tastes basic principles and just kind of figure outif they're, aligned, right and a basic belief systems are living the sameculture within a household yeah? So you know, first of all, the childrenare going to be the product of the upbring. We all are right most of ourcore values system, so we all have core values: okay, maybe i'll even go onestep higher to help explain this answer. Every one of us have several valuesthat drive our decision making- okaye-...

...maybe maybe ken maybe you've- gotthirty. Forty or fifty values that make up ken macmorogh and i've got the sameto make up crystallize, but there are a handful of those values somewherearound three to five of them that are really the core drivers of ouroperating system. Okay- and you know they don't have to,but they often can fall into categories like how we look at money, how we lookat religion, how we look at at you know treating others et cetera, okay, butthere is this handful of like core values that make up ninety percent of what drives you everysingle day at the end of the end, and it happens at a very, very deepsubconscious level. Almost all of those are established inyou at a very, very young age. Okay, so you know, i often will sayprobably ninety ninety five percent by the time you're, ten or twelve yearsold you are, who you are from value systema little bit of that might get rounded out by the time you graduate fromcollege, but this becomes a major driver and they don't change in yourlifetime. It's funny. I had this friend who was a hard driving tough. You know business man, he had a lot ofsuccess and he had a cancer diagnosis, and i sawhis personality change and i used to think wells values system changed. Youknow that you know he got cured and he looked at life a whole different way.His values changed, but actually, as i got to know him and realize his valuesnever changed. His personality changed how we approached the world change, buthis actual value system didn't. You know how he looked at his family, howhe looked at how he how he worked, how he did things he was still as driven.He just might not have been, as quote unquote tough as he used to be, but thedrive never changed right, so those those value systems become ingrainedand they don't change. When you bring two people together,whether it's two friends but whether it's two people who date or or you know, are going to have some levelor two people who work together, the more allying those values arebetween the two people, the higher the likelihood is for a successfulrelationship. It's not a guarantee, but if those value systems are notaligned sooner or later, there will be a break that will cause the two peopleto not want to interact with each other right i mean i can just i've known somany people who've been through divorces and when you, when you reallycut through it almost every time now, i can see that it was a core values issuethat ultimately caused the problem right at the end of the day. So maybethey were attracted by non values based attraction. You know the laws ofattraction are so many different things, but at the end of the day, it's thevalues that will cause the real break. If the values are stable, it's not aguarantee, but the likelihood of them. Staying together as high. We had acouple that we know that god got divorced recently and seemed to shockeverybody, but it didn't shop me because they had diversely differentcore value systems. E, though, on the surface, their personality seem like agreat mix, so good marriage counseling is really based on that. Isn't itwhat's your shared background? What's your shared sense of values in allareas, sense of ethics morals, you view finance, i mean, don't thoseall go into who you are as a person and see it? I think so. I think so.Obviously, i'm not a marriage counselor to be able to say that, but i wouldthink that a good counselor, but but i think you have to also be prepared thatif there's a misalignment of core valley is it time to, you know, cut andgo the other direction. I mean when we look at this from a corporatestandpoint. If we've got somebody who truly doesn't have the core values ofthe company, i don't really want them in my company. I want they can don't behappy or somewhere else where they have alignment somewhere else, there'salways going to be problems with people who are mismatch again, i'm not judgingwhether or they're good or bad person, i'm judging whether they are a good orbad fit for the organization or for the team yeah in the friend zone. I think in a general sense. I have alot of friends because i'm a acceptant of anybody. Anybody that wants to givetheir time to talk to me or be some part of my life is welcome. However,without me feeling like i'm excluding anybody, there ends up being this central core group of people that arecloser, but doesn't it like naturally happen because your core values line up? Yes, i mean what you'll find is t t tthat, when you're in an unaware state where you're consciously choosing thesubconscious is doing the work for you- and so you know, friend, groups are theeasiest. The spouses are where people can get it, maybe in a little moretrouble, because sometimes sometimes marriages occur before they really knowe known each other long enough to really know who the person is right,but okay set that aside, friends are together for long periods of time andif i think back on my life and i'll challenge you to think back on yours,there are people who are friends that i may never talk to again, and it doesn'tagain. I you know not that they're bad...

...or anything, but i just don't feel likeit just doesn't feel right. Well, if i think about it, they just don't havethe same values and that's okay. They just don't my best friend and my best friends. We do have the same values now. Thenext question is: how do you take it to conscious versus subconscious right?That's a little bit more work. So if i texted you one day said chris, whydon't you ever talk to me anymore? Would you say i just i don't feel likeit? I don't feel like it can mean we all haven't same values right well,you're, a good example, because you know with the work i've had in the past.I've done a lot of speaker, invitations, hiring speakersor just asking for go did it today i mean this is asking someone to come onthe podcast, so i've been doing that a long time. So i can't even tell you theamount of speakers that i've dealt with all over the country coming in to speakat things that i've helped ner organized and you know they come and go,and i don't feel that i disliked any of them, but then some of them. I considerfriends, even if i a spent that time of one of them you we had a guest onbefore check, gatako, who would ever think i'm friends with the channel forweather man. When i was a kid, it would never have crossed my mind, but i'mfriends with chuck ada go really because you just it's a similar valuesand you just somehow easy to talk to e h. It's funny, so you know yeah you andi do have very aligned values. So so it is what why it works. It's why we'vecontinued, and you know why we've helped each other. I think over time.It's just that's what you do for people. You feel that connection with i justyesterday reconnected with a friend of mine. Just briefly through text, myfriend frank, we have same core values, and i i haven't talked to frank iprobably ten years, and but it's like it's, like the friendship, never goesaway right. Sometimes you have these times a part, but but the connectionstill stays yeah and then so with relationships or,like you said, with businesses. I think your most content when, at some point you just need worklike you know, i was out of work for a while, and you were trying to do yourbest to help me when i'm in a place. I'm really content, not just becausei'm working i could have worked before but is trying to find a place that ifelt good about that. I could relax and not just do the best of what i do, butthat you're with people that your core values are aligned with. So there's notthat day to day rub you spend eight hours a day with these people,sometimes more and if you're not aligned and how you view the world orlife or why you're doing what you do? It's tough. You know it's funny. Howoften hiring occurs for a reason for reasons that are not exactly the rightreasons. You know we pick somebody we like they got all the skills that wejust pick. Somebody we like or- or we feel like. This is the person we needto have, and you know in our work. We work very closely with organizations toensure that they've got a system that minimizes hiring mistakes, and we dothat by ensuring that they're not just clear and they have the right corevalues, and so we have a whole process for getting there, but but alsoensuring that when they're hiring there they're getting people who have thesame core values or very similar and very high level of alignment, it takeslonger to find that person and in a market like this, where it's hard tofind people anyway, it's tough, but but it takes longer to find somebody withcore values alignment. But we know that the longevity of that employee oncehired is considerably longer, i mean, could be five ten times longer. In somecases, may maybe they become forever employees once at alignment is there.It's very powerful seems true in personal relationships, but you know,as you know, from for my working with you and i've done this for a lot offriends when i've got friends who have either left a company because offrustrations or whatever they use that again, usually they're leaving causersvalues. They don't think that way. You know the other stuff that bugs them iswhat causes them to leave. Or you know if they've been terminatedagain, there's something that's a play there. I will coach, i will coachpeople and help them, and i just just do this as i did with you, understandyour core values and don't settle for just anywhere. You know. Sometimes wefall into this. The thing like we need a job. We need a job and look if yougot to feed your family, take whatever job you can work hard, but get yourselfout of that situation. Go the big boy, yeah right and- and you know i think,about another friend of mine who you know. Fortunately he had a little bitof a golden parachute. He didn't eat anything urgently but as he wentthrough his interviewing, i just harped on him make sure you're interviewingthem for their core values. You don't and when he started doing that. It'samazing he's like wow, you know from a job standpoint. This one would havebeen really great, but they don't have my core values. So you know, i don'tthink i'm a good fit good. The choices it's important from both sides. We wantpeople to be happy and tied up and it's essential from that standpoint. So whenhe finally found a place with his values, he's happy yeah. How are youdoing? Am i happy yeah? Let's defind happy, i don't know i just everyone. Does itright? What is it i have a well so so...

...here's the thing ye plan at a placewith similar values, to you, yeah for sure yeah yeah, and how does it makeyou feel happy? I mean every day's a great day, but butthe pin of the matter right, but a big boy and get a strawberry sunday. I'm sohave no hot fudge: cake man, oh yeah, right! So in execute party. You know you listyour court values and one says next: kid is driven by passion for helpingothers. It drives what we do and how we do it, and i pointed that out. You knowyour own core values, but it's easy to put stuff on a wall, but, like i read that, and it literally could say: crystalizeis driven by a passion for helping others. It drives away, he does and howhe does it, because i know you personally and that's totally true andthen i know that it would come out in how you do your work. When i i didn'thardly know you other than having you come, speak of something and then i had a job situation, but notonly were you helpful, i mean you are offering your time andassistance as me as a human being, just whatever i need and, like you saidcoaching just on the phone. How am i doing? What is a cedmon thing? He doesbest in the world. You know what is your place and it sounds. You know alittle bit trite and cheesy when i say it this way, but at times you reallyneed that yeah and in a companies had that kind of heartper employ with those kinds of values. What a joy to work at something imentioned you earlier, it say again is with you the size of let's say, executein the other people you have working with. You is manageable in that theplace i work, it's started, small, it's growing rapidly and it's growing out ofcore values and that they're carrying about their clients and they're caringabout community and such. But do you ever get to a point wherethe organization is so big? How is that it's not manageable, you need to fillpositions and you need to hire and expand. And how do you manage thatpersonal? That's so much easier if you have a handful of employees than if youhave a few thousand employes yeah the perspective. It's actually not! I guess. Let me let me go back.You guys are at a great place because you know who you are from a valuestandpoint and if you become obsessed now with hiring people and it becomespart of your culture, then that will be your culture right and you'll drive itand, as you hire people, and they understand that you only want to hirepeople with a similar core values. They will do the same and as you get bigger,if you have systems to measure people's values system to make sure you got theright people, because here's the thing people will hire people with similarvalues systems. And so, if you start getting people who are dissimilar invalues that can become almost like a cancer and an organization can grow. Sowe have to. We all always have to make sure we're mitigating against mistakes.But the key is is if you stay obsessive about interviewing for core values andhiring and then taking people out when you, if you discover they don't havethe core values and just you know allowing them to be somewhere else.Freeing up their futures will often say as long as you stay obsessive about it.It won't get any more complicated, even if you're a hundred people a thousandpeople, a hundred thousand people. You know at the end of the day. That's howyou were. I look back at a big boy and i don't know i think at one time, ifyou took the whole franchise system, we had a lot of people. We had a lot a lotof people, i mean, if you figure on any, given store pay roll. You can have upto ninety people if you include all the park time and this, and that and youmultiply it by- you- know a thousand stores. Fifty und i mean you startgetting some pretty big numbers and i can tell you the people that didn'thave the quality mind set, didn't survive. People who didn't have t e the service, mind set the family, mind setthose things, they didn't survive right and that's because the culture drivesit and so the best time to do. It is now when you're small if, on the otherhand, you're a big company now hundred thousand hundred thousand people inyou're just starting this, then you get a lot of work ahead of you and it willbe hard and it will be cumbersome and it will take a lot of time to shift.But you guys are a great position. The key is not going to be whether or notit'll be et difficult to do it. It's. How obsessive do you want to be aboutit and as long as you stay obsessive about it, you will be fine, so to kind of bring this together, bring itdown to the individual person. So me, if i'm listening to this and i'mthinking, i get a better understanding, core values, or i just have moreawareness that i have core values or that no wonder, there's a rub in arelationship or a bad situation at work, and you know figuring out identifying the problem isthe first answer to solving it.

Personally, what's the first steps orhow many, like i say, do it? Do i just certain evaluate myself: what are mycore values sits down? You make a list of ten things that are most important.You prioritize like first thing that comes to mind the most important inyour life and is at ri core values. Well, you know, first and foremost, it'salways good to work with some people that you know. Okay, so one of thethings that i would do is, i would i'd pick, let's say ten peoplein your life. That know you really really well okay and ask them. You know. What do you think are the youknow if you had to pick two or three values you know use whatever words youlike, if you had to pick two or three values that you think really describe,who i am as a person? What would they be and the reason why isay is often the people who know you see things in you that you won't see inyourself right are too close to it right. So you know when you went, youknow when you think about me. What are the? What are the first couplewords that come to mind always really compassionate. You know, god he's themost trustworthy person, i've ever known, yea, no, no through those poppedin my head yeah, but i mean so that's one of themethodologies now another another way of doing. This is there's a series ofquestions and those questions would include things like describe in depth,something that's truly beautiful to you. Now again the sound a little corny, butwithin them our values systems right so so describe something really beautifuldescribe what a perfect day off. If you had no constraints about money oranything else, what would be a perfect vacation? What would you perfect dayoff? Well, you know the old tombs, don't question: what do you want yourtombstone to read? So you pick a couple of those questions and really selfreflect write, a couple pages on each one of them and then from your writings.Let him sit for a week or two go back and start pulling out the individualvalues that you find in those. So here, let's just let's play a little bit fora minute. Okay, we'll just do this really brief, but but describe for meyour perfect day off. What would you do? Oh my on perfect day off sleep. It's probably not a value, butjust first thing comes my head a little bit. I don't know you know i nation, outsidetime with people that are close to you family relationships. So there you got two values right:there, family and relationship sleep could be about rejuvenation and selfcare right. I mean you know i mean we do but but but these these are values,not necessarily core values. But these are our values right, and so i only use that as abrief example, because, as you describe this stuff out, you then need to pullout all the values and you might get a list, as i mentioned early of it. Sixtyvalues now start looking at that list and start asking yourself out of thefifty or sixty, let's cut them in half and let's cut him in a half again now,you're down to fifteen and then of the fifteen of those hate are the ones thatare deal breakers for you with your relationships with other people. I knowif they don't have these values. What are the ones and ye prioritize them inthe top three to five of them? You know you're, probably pretty close to yourcore values at that point, and if you couple that with you know, askingfriends you know, how would you describe me in a couple of words or orwhat do you think are the values that that i exhibit what are the top two orthree values? You think i exhibit core values, you're going to find it prettysimilar and now you're close, and it's a question of now kind of word:smithing them for your life yeah, that's scary! To do, though, isn't it imean it's easier with your friends because they don't know as close asyour family. I think the closer you get in your little nervous what thoseanswers are going to be yeah, and you know what i would be hesitant. I hateto say this: i mean i'm hesitant on doing it family, because family arejaded a little bit right. I mean the fa family always has it to me. It's theclose friendships that you've made out there because they're going to havesimilar values as well right right. So so i think the friends can sometimeswhen it comes to core values, give you some really really solid insight andthen there are and the family members that you know that will take an honestlook like i wouldn't ask my mom. You know i mean you know she's gonna she's,going to sing my praises and i'm going to get a whole bunch of stuff. That'sgreat about me, but trying to still that down to some values. That's gonnabe hard. I want people who are who know me, but don't know me so well thatthey're just going to you, know just blow all the compliments at me. I'm notlooking for. Compliments! I'm trying to understand what people recognize right. Well, chris, when we post thisconversation everywhere, it's posted we'll have an email address to executeand we will also have where they could listen to your your program, sure sothirty seconds. Where is that, though? And what is it? What do you do on yourradio s? So the radio show is called transformative experts and we highlightpeople who are creating transformation in the world someway or another. Nowmost of them happen to be in the...

...business world we tend to be were airedon a business channel. We are aired through the voice, america, radionetwork. The show runs at a m pacific eleven, a m eastern time every mondaymorning, and it's you know it's great show. It also gets posted as a podcast.If you search transformative experts you're going to find us on, i heartradio now so we're now on a heart radio and we're on you know i tunes or the apple podcastwere on spotiswood we're syndicated to a bunch of other areas. Now so there'sthere's lots of places. If you look for a chrysalis and transformat ackers,you'll find the show, and obviously you know from an execute standpoint-anybody who no passion for helping others, it's our first. I e. I talk topeople all the time. Call you know, send me an email. Our phone numberslisted on the website calling me is always the better bet you get to me faster, but we l. Youknow anybody got a question i'll answer it. I don't worry, you won't get a billright. Can you never got a bill? I don't think i haven't not yet hope verygenerous. All right. Thanks chris, i know you're a busy man and i appreciateyou taking the time out today. It was a pleasure ken any time all right, thankyou, and this is sponsored by executive wealth management and will close outfor usual, with a video show a little more on what they do there. We are in a period of time of intenseand continuous change. People who want to build wealth need to know that aninvestment philosophy and process is critical to any long term investmentstrategy, so clients when they're. Looking at their portfolios and they're,seeing the markets move in a very negative fashion or even in a positivefashion, and we want to make sure that we're taking advantage of what themarket to doing so we're building we're defending and were advancing thatstrategy through compassionate growth. We build defend in advance. That is thefounding principle of our investment philosophy, clients, knowing that theycan be up at one level of risk and very gradually reduced as on a non emotionalanalysis, is mathematically driven. It is based on the system that is builtfor a very large community. Our team is built up of not just a couple adviserswith their assistance like you'll see in a lot of offices, we have ourinvestment team here, an investment policy committee. We have ouroperations department here we have a compliance department. Here we have atechnology department here which allows our advisors to have more direct accesswhich allows them to not have to jump through as many hoops when that justleads to a more efficient clint experience. I wanted to be part of acompany that had and fostered that team work that had regular meetings like thecase studies, the collaboration, the practice management- i saw a ton ofvalue in that being part of a team is crucial for me. I came from almosttwenty years in the banking channel. Thinking about why i came here wasspecifically to do with the way that they treat the employees as family. Wehave a great culture here. That's one of the things i really take pride in.It is about chemistry. You need people to want to be here. The fact that we'retreated so well allows me to focus and other things for our clients and how ican help them, and what i really found special about this place was that theemphasis i'm building relationships- and that is something that i've carriedinto my practice as an adviser. I want to build that plan and then obviouslyallow us to defend it, but ultimately is that peace of mind that we're inhelem advance going forward, i'm the partner to the investor. With insidethe firm, i really enjoy answering clients questions a lot of our clientslike to read thoroughly through our disclosure documents, and they have alot of excellent questions, and part of my job is to ensure that the client isinformed and has access to that information. So, if there's ever a timewhere a client has a question and if they just want to give me a call, theyare always welcome to do that. We communicate with our clients. We arefollowing up with clients when they ask questions, we want to make sure we'repro active and doing that and that's part of our strategy of building anddefending an advancing or our relationship. I've been working forexecutive olt management for over ten years. I love the people that i workwith with great clients, our clients trust us. We care about our clients,building report folio and your retirement, defending it when it needsto be defended in difficult times and advancing it when things turn build,defend, advance schedule, an appointment to day and meet with anexecutive wealth management adviser to learn how we can build defend inadvance. You are investment future.

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